Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Tell us what you thought! HDP IV survey inside
  6. Health Datapalooza IV Tops Off a Huge Year in Health Data Liberation & Innovation
  7. Health Data All-Stars
    1. About
      1. User Features
      2. Forum One Communications
    2. Directory
      1. State Health Facts
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      2. Dartmouth Atlas
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      3. County Health Rankings
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      4. CMS Data Navigator
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      5. Health Indicators Warehouse
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      6. Kids Count
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      7. America’s Health Rankings
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      8. American FactFinder
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      9. CDC Wonder
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      10. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      11. Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      12. DiversityData.org
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      13. Health System Data Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      14. National Health Interview Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      15. Oral Health Data Systems
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      16. RWJF DataHub
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      17. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      18. Why Not the Best
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      19. AskCHIS
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      20. Global Health Data Exchange
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      21. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      22. Global Health Observatory
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      23. American Hospital Association DataViewer
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      24. CalHospital Compare.org
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      25. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      26. Medicare Claims Synthetic Public Use Files
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      27. CalQuality Care
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      28. Nursing Home Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      29. County Health Calculator
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      30. Global Burden of Disease Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      31. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      32. Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Hopsital Discharge Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      33. Health System Management Project
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      34. Child Trends
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      35. Community Commons
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      36. HealthyCity
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      37. Hospital Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      38. National Institute of Mental Health
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      39. State Health Access Data Assistance Center – Data Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      40. The Office On Women’s Health: Quick Health Data Online
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      41. Area Resource File
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      42. Find the Best
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      43. Health Landscape
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      44. Kids Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      45. Minnesota Population Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      46. University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study (HRS)
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      47. Cal Dept. of Public Health and Education Data sites
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      48. Governor O’Malley’s StateStat
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      49. NYC Open Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      50. California Healthy Kids Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
  8. NEXT

Health Data All-Stars

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Tell us what you thought! HDP IV survey inside
  6. Health Datapalooza IV Tops Off a Huge Year in Health Data Liberation & Innovation
  7. Health Data All-Stars
    1. About
      1. User Features
      2. Forum One Communications
    2. Directory
      1. State Health Facts
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      2. Dartmouth Atlas
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      3. County Health Rankings
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      4. CMS Data Navigator
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      5. Health Indicators Warehouse
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      6. Kids Count
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      7. America’s Health Rankings
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      8. American FactFinder
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      9. CDC Wonder
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      10. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      11. Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      12. DiversityData.org
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      13. Health System Data Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      14. National Health Interview Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      15. Oral Health Data Systems
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      16. RWJF DataHub
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      17. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      18. Why Not the Best
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      19. AskCHIS
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      20. Global Health Data Exchange
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      21. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      22. Global Health Observatory
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      23. American Hospital Association DataViewer
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      24. CalHospital Compare.org
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      25. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      26. Medicare Claims Synthetic Public Use Files
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      27. CalQuality Care
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      28. Nursing Home Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      29. County Health Calculator
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      30. Global Burden of Disease Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      31. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      32. Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Hopsital Discharge Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      33. Health System Management Project
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      34. Child Trends
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      35. Community Commons
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      36. HealthyCity
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      37. Hospital Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      38. National Institute of Mental Health
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      39. State Health Access Data Assistance Center – Data Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      40. The Office On Women’s Health: Quick Health Data Online
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      41. Area Resource File
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      42. Find the Best
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      43. Health Landscape
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      44. Kids Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      45. Minnesota Population Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      46. University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study (HRS)
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      47. Cal Dept. of Public Health and Education Data sites
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      48. Governor O’Malley’s StateStat
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      49. NYC Open Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      50. California Healthy Kids Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
  8. NEXT

  1. Story
  2. Slides
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Tell us what you thought! HDP IV survey inside
  6. Health Datapalooza IV Tops Off a Huge Year in Health Data Liberation & Innovation
  7. Health Data All-Stars
    1. About
      1. User Features
      2. Forum One Communications
    2. Directory
      1. State Health Facts
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      2. Dartmouth Atlas
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      3. County Health Rankings
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      4. CMS Data Navigator
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      5. Health Indicators Warehouse
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      6. Kids Count
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      7. America’s Health Rankings
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      8. American FactFinder
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      9. CDC Wonder
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      10. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      11. Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      12. DiversityData.org
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      13. Health System Data Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      14. National Health Interview Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      15. Oral Health Data Systems
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      16. RWJF DataHub
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      17. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      18. Why Not the Best
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      19. AskCHIS
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      20. Global Health Data Exchange
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      21. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      22. Global Health Observatory
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      23. American Hospital Association DataViewer
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      24. CalHospital Compare.org
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      25. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      26. Medicare Claims Synthetic Public Use Files
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      27. CalQuality Care
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      28. Nursing Home Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      29. County Health Calculator
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
        6. Related Data
      30. Global Burden of Disease Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      31. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      32. Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Hopsital Discharge Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      33. Health System Management Project
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      34. Child Trends
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      35. Community Commons
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      36. HealthyCity
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      37. Hospital Compare
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      38. National Institute of Mental Health
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      39. State Health Access Data Assistance Center – Data Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      40. The Office On Women’s Health: Quick Health Data Online
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      41. Area Resource File
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      42. Find the Best
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      43. Health Landscape
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      44. Kids Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      45. Minnesota Population Center
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      46. University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study (HRS)
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      47. Cal Dept. of Public Health and Education Data sites
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Maintained by
      48. Governor O’Malley’s StateStat
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      49. NYC Open Data
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
      50. California Healthy Kids Survey
        1. Description
        2. Why is this an All-Star?
        3. Features
        4. Data Frequency
        5. Maintained by
  8. NEXT

Story

Health Data All-Stars at Health Datapalooza IV

Todd Park and Bryan Sivak summarized the Health Datapalooza IV successes and asked attendees for three things, but working with the Health Data All Stars was not one of them.

Theri three asks were:

  1. Help consumers make smart decisions on health insurance - Think about how you can use your talents to connect people with health insurance. Develop an app to help us provide consumers with even more ways to calculate costs and pick a plan that fits their budget. As part of the health care law, we are making information about health plans more transparent and accessible.
  2. Increase the availability of local health data - Help us encourage the private sector and state and local governments to make local health data more available. While we have seen progress so far in this area, more can be done.
  3. Adopt Blue Button Plus - We are encouraging all providers and health plans to adopt Blue Button Plus to make it even easier for consumers to download their health information. An "automated" Blue Button could create a new ecosystem of consumer applications that empower individuals and their families to better manage their health and health finances.

So far this has been about "data liberation", but most of the data has been available for years, and about the innovation, new products and jobs these data are creating, but it is difficult for me to see the direct link between data and the new products and jobs because very few actual data results are shown. Datapalooza V should change that by focusing on Health Data Science.

The Health Data All Stars is a directory of 50 (actually 51) prominent domestic resources for health data at the federal, state and local levels housed on the Health Data Consortium’s website. To compile the directory, we spoke with leading health researchers, government officials, entrepreneurs, advocates and others to identify the health data resources that matter most. View our list, help us refine it, and suggest new resources. The Health Data All Stars is supported through a grant from the California HealthCare Foundation

The All Stars are not formally ranked, but they are not simply presented in alphabetical order. The resources at the top of the list were mentioned most frequently by the health data experts we interviewed and surveyed as part of this effort.

Following this last statement, I am strating to drill-down into the top 10 or so. I wonder why the NewYork is so far down the list given that it received the the 2013 Health Data Liberation Award.

The Kaiser Family Foundation site is truly amazing. See the What's New in the recently redesigned site. It has recent policy related stories and data sets to analyze.

The Dartmouth Atlas Spotlights: TRACKING IMPROVEMENT IN THE CARE OF CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS: A DARTMOUTH ATLAS BRIEF ON MEDICARE BENEFICIARIES NEAR THE END OF LIFE featuring a complete package of information: Read the briefpress release, or download data which concludes: This Dartmouth Atlas brief demonstrates that improvements in care have occurred between 2007 and 2010 for chronically ill Medicare patients in their last six months of life. However, the pace of change varied across regions and hospitals, with some experiencing rapid change while other health systems showed little improvement.

MORE IN PROCESS

Slides

Spotfire Dashboard

Research Notes

Submit this to: http://www.healthdataconsortium.org/data-sources/suggest

New Children and Adolescent Health Data and SEER?

Tell us what you thought! HDP IV survey inside

Email: June 12, 2013

We want to hear from you!

Health Datapalooza IV is over, but we want to keep the conversation going. Tell us what worked (and what didn't) in this short survey.  We will use your responses to evaluate this year's event and plan for 2014.  Complete the survey by June 19th, 2013 to be entered to win complimentary registration to Health Datapalooza 2014!

Tell us about your Health Datapalooza IV experience.My Note: I did this

We're also pleased to say that the photos and presentations from the event are online now, and all videos will be posted shortly. You can find them in the online agenda, or browse:

Save the date! Health Datapalooza 2014 will be held on June 1st-3rd, 2014 in Washington, DC.

Thanks,
The Health Datapalooza IV team

Health Datapalooza IV Tops Off a Huge Year in Health Data Liberation & Innovation

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/06/07/health-datapalooza-iv-tops-huge-year-health-data-liberation-innovation

This article is cross-posted on HHS.gov

Health Datapalooza IV has officially wrapped and with over 1900 attendees and 80 companies, this was the biggest palooza yet. Kicked off by Secretary Sebelius for the second year in a row, this year’s event was a tremendous display of health data in action.

Looking back now, it is amazing to think that four years ago this all started with 45 people in a small room at the Institute of Medicine.  Over the course of those four years the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has liberated over 400 datasets, participated in a countless number of codeathons, and has seen and helped developers build hundreds of apps, services, and products using health data.

At HHS, we have evolved and improved how we make health data available to the public. Last year, we launched a new version of healthdata.gov and made it significantly easier for our internal publishers to get their datasets listed, both manually and through an application programming interface (API). We've added the ability to generate APIs from any dataset that's stored directly in our database; TXT4Tots is the most recent example of this. And lastly, building on the Presidential Open Data Executive Order, we’ve made data more discoverable by releasing our healthdata.gov/data.json file. This will make it very easy for other data catalogs to consume the records in Healthdata.gov, allowing for the easy spread of open health data. We even open-sourced the CKAN extension that generates the data.json file on Project Open Data .

This year at Health Datapalooza we featured a Data Lab Session with HHS’s Health Data Leads. The Health Data Leads are subject matter experts who are changing the culture of data liberation at HHS by identifying and releasing new data sets, describing the context of data and providing insights into its use, and providing data education to entrepreneurs. This session highlighted datasets from a number of HHS agencies, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health and more.

In addition to the work we have done to make it easier to find and access HHS data, we have launched a number of new data-use opportunities over the past year. We have challenged entrepreneurs and tech developers to take our data and create apps to help mothers and children live healthier lives with the TXT4Apps Challenge; we have asked people to mash up air-quality data with individual health data with the My Air, My Health Challenge; and we have just launched the new Blue Button CoDesign Challenge. This challenge aims to increase the number of consumer-facing applications able to receive clinical data via Blue Button Plus. This challenge will also uniquely engage the patient community to teach us what patients most want to do with their clinical data by crowdsourcing application ideas and incorporating patients in product design. You can participate too: submit your idea at http://ideas.healthtechhatch.com by June 11.

This Administration has been focusing on empowering Americans’ with access to their own personal data. The Administration has launched My Data Initiatives across multiple sectors including health, energy, and education. In the health domain, thanks to Blue Button, some 88 million Americans now have access to a digital copy of their health records or health claims from Federal agencies such as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Department of Defense (DoD) and private health plans such as United HealthCare and Aetna. This past year, HHS partnered with industry to advance the next generation of Blue Button—making the data machine-readable and able to be transmitted securely to consumer applications. 

Sixty-eight health technology companies and organizations (including electronic health record companies, health plans, and patient privacy organizations) collaborated on this next version of Blue Button, called Blue Button Plus—which will serve as a blueprint for the automated, structured, and secure transmission of personal health data on behalf of a patient. In February 2013, the Blue Button Plus Implementation Guide was published.

Lastly, coming out of this years Health Datapalooza, we have three asks of you.

  1. Help consumers make smart decisions on health insurance - Think about how you can use your talents to connect people with health insurance. Develop an app to help us provide consumers with even more ways to calculate costs and pick a plan that fits their budget. As part of the health care law, we are making information about health plans more transparent and accessible.
  2. Increase the availability of local health data - Help us encourage the private sector and state and local governments to make local health data more available. While we have seen progress so far in this area, more can be done.
  3. Adopt Blue Button Plus - We are encouraging all providers and health plans to adopt Blue Button Plus to make it even easier for consumers to download their health information. An "automated" Blue Button could create a new ecosystem of consumer applications that empower individuals and their families to better manage their health and health finances.

If you missed the excitement of the Health Datapalooza this year, the next one is already set for June 1 – 3, 2014, in Washington, DC.  See you there!

Todd Park is US Chief Technology Officer

Bryan Sivak is HHS Chief Technology Officer

Health Data All-Stars

Source: http://www.healthdataconsortium.org/data-sources

Health Data All Stars is a directory of 50 prominent domestic resources for health data at the federal, state and local levels housed on the Health Data Consortium’s website. To compile the directory, we spoke with leading health researchers, government officials, entrepreneurs, advocates and others to identify the health data resources that matter most. View our list, help us refine it, and suggest new resources.

The Health Data All Stars is supported through a grant from the California HealthCare Foundation.

California Health Care Foundation

About

Source: http://www.healthdataconsortium.org/data-sources/about-all-stars

Health Data All Stars is a directory of 50 prominent domestic resources for health data at the federal, state and local levels housed on the Health Data Consortium’s website. To compile the directory, we spoke with leading health researchers, government officials, entrepreneurs, advocates and others to identify the health data resources that matter most.

The All Stars are not formally ranked, but they are not simply presented in alphabetical order. The resources at the top of the list were mentioned most frequently by the health data experts we interviewed and surveyed as part of this effort.

User Features

  • Highlights user-friendly data exploration and visualization tools such as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute’s County Health Rankings and the Kaiser Family Foundation’s State Health Facts
  • Showcases powerful government data query tools such as the Health Indicators Warehouse and CDC Wonder
  • Exposes resources that offer application programming interfaces (APIs) for web developers, and/or other means to export raw data for analysis or re-use
  • Provides a browsable list of 50 All Stars–all contained within a single webpage
  • Allows users to filter the list by health topic, geography, data view and export options
  • Presents each All Star on a unique page including: a screenshot of the interface, a description of its data and functionality, reasons why we’ve included it in the directory, and, a prominent link to visit and explore the website

We welcome your comments to help us refine the list and descriptions, and suggest new resources!

Directory

State Health Facts

http://kff.org/statedata/

Description

State Health Facts provides data on more than 800 healthcare, demographic and coverage-related topics for all 50 states. The data come from an analysis of the Census Bureau's surveys. This is a project of the Kaiser Family Foundation and the site offers updated reports, news, and publications relavant to each healthcare topic.

Screen Shot 2013-05-06 at 12.05.23 PM

State Health Facts, a project of the Kaiser Family Foundation (http://www.kff.org), provides data on more than 700 health care, demographic, and health insurance coverage-related indicators for all 50 states. The data come from a variety of public and private sources, including Kaiser Family Foundation reports, public websites, government surveys and reports, and private organizations. The site offers updated reports, news articles, and publications relevant to each indicator.

Data are organized in readable tables that allow for state-by-state comparisons, as well as comparisons to national averages. Users can also map, rank, trend, and download data. RSS feeds and links to new and updated indicators make it easy for users to view the most recent information.

This is a great resource for newcomers to the health data world because the site also offers data on related demographic issues, like population, birth rates and more.

Why is this an All-Star?

Dartmouth Atlas

http://www.dartmouthatlas.org

Description

For more than 20 years, the Dartmouth Atlas Project has documented glaring variations in how medical resources are distributed and used in the United States. The project uses Medicare data to provide information and analysis about national, regional, and local markets, as well as hospitals and their affiliated physicians.

Screen Shot 2013-04-25 at 12.49.47 PM

This site has many features and tools to customize the extensive amount of data. Users can drill down to specific states and referral regions, as well as specific hospitals. It is easy to make, customize, and share reports, maps, and charts. Each chart or report can be downloaded to PDF, PowerPoint or Excel. Maps can be shared with a link or on another website with a given embed code.

The site also offers some tools for breaking the data down for easier analysis. The Hospital Care Intensity tool lets you compare hospitals based on their relative intensity of inpatient care delivered by the providers. The list visualizations by state let you see how hospitals stack up on this one important measurement of inpatient care. Another feature, the benchmarking tool, allows users to compare the healthcare experience of selected areas or hospitals to the national average.

County Health Rankings

http://www.countyhealthrankings.org

Description

The Wisconsin Population Health Institute’s County Health Rankings & Roadmaps show that where we live matters to our health. County Health Rankings & Roadmaps show that where we live matters to our health. It provides county-by-county health rankings in each of the 50 states, explanations of each health factor, and actionable strategies to improve the health of communities across the nation.

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As users click each state, they can see how the counties compare through heat maps and a list view. They can further look at how the counties compare in different health outcomes and factors.

County Health Rankings and Roadmaps is just as user-friendly on mobile and tablet tablet devices through responsive design.

The website is a joint collaboration between the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Why is this an All-Star?

CMS Data Navigator

http://dnav.cms.gov/

Description

The CMS Data Navigator is an easy-to-use, menu-driven search tool that makes the data and information resources of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) more easily available.

Screen Shot 2013-04-24 at 9.24.12 AMThe CMS Data Navigator is an easy-to-use, menu-driven search tool that makes the data and information resources of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) more easily available. Use the Data Navigator to find data and information products for specific CMS programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, or on specific health care topics or settings-of-care. Navigator displays search results by data type, making it easier to locate specific types of information (e.g., data files, publications, statistical reports, etc.).

The search results can be sorted by popularity or alphabetical order. They are also conveniently grouped by type.

Health Indicators Warehouse

http://www.healthindicators.gov

Description

The Health Indicators Warehouse (HIW) stores and displays a database of national, state, and local health indicators, reflecting multiple dimensions of population health, health care, and health determinants. Indicators are categorized by topic, by geography, and by initiative.

Screen Shot 2013-05-06 at 11.51.38 AMThe Health Indicators Warehouse (HIW) stores and displays a database of national, state, and local health indicators, reflecting multiple dimensions of population health, health care, and health determinants. Indicators are categorized by topic, geography, and initiative.

The HIW is one of the most comprehensive sources of health indicator data, with over 1,200 indicators across topics from Maternal and Infant Health to Public Health Infrastructure. The data can be viewed in a table, chart, or map. Users also can download the data into Excel-friendly formats.

Although anyone can easily navigate the site, the data is especially helpful for developers and researchers looking for original data that they can export and reformat for their own uses.

The HIW is a collaboration of many agencies and offices within the Department of Health and Human Services.

Why is this an All-Star?

Kids Count

http://datacenter.kidscount.org/

Description

Kids Count offers hundreds of measures of child well-being. The data are supplied by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and its dozens of local grantees. Topics include everything children-related from education to health factors.

Screen Shot 2013-05-06 at 11.59.29 AMKids Count offers hundreds of measures of child well-being. The data are supplied by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and its dozens of local grantees. Topics include everything children-related from education to health factors.

State pages list relevant data as well as local grantees the with whom the Foundation works. They also list the featured health indicators relevant to that state. Each data set can be displayed by ranking, map, or line graph with up to 7 states. Users can share the images on their social networks, personal devices, or add the images to their own sites. It is also easy to download the raw data to CSV files.

This site is especially easy to use for people new to the health data world, given the intuitive user interface.

America’s Health Rankings

http://www.americashealthrankings.org

Description

America's Health Rankings works to track the state of our nation’s health by studying numerous health measures to compile a comprehensive perspective on our nation’s health issues, state by state.

America's Health Rankings

America’s Health Rankings assesses the state of our nation’s health by tracking numerous health measures on a state-by-state basis.

Each year, America’s Health Rankings puts together a report based on four groups of health determinants, including behaviors, community and environment, policy and clinical care. Through its own methodology, America’s Health Rankings creates a ranking based on how these factors work together to create overall healthiness.

The site offers several places for users to promote public conversation concerning health in our states and provides information to facilitate citizen, community, and group participation. The Take Action Center offers users ways they can make changes in the issues the data explore.

Why is this an All-Star?

American FactFinder

http://factfinder2.census.gov

Description

American FactFinder provides access to data from several censuses and surveys across topics from income to education. This is a very comprehensive resource that concentrates on community factors. It houses data from the most recent census as well as previous years. It has information on how the census defines terms, the geography and more. With respect to health, it provides reliable, accessible information on health insurance status used by many other All Stars.

American FactFinder

The Census Bureau’s American FactFinder provides access to data from several censuses and surveys across topics ranging from income to education. This is a very comprehensive resource that concentrates on community factors. It houses data from the most recent census, as well as previous years. It has information on how the census defines terms, the geography and more. With respect to health, it provides reliable, accessible information on health insurance status used by many other All Stars.

Users can search for community data by state, county, city, town, or zip code, and then create customizable tables which can be downloaded to PDF, Excel or RichText formats. For more advanced users, the Census Bureau provides API access to selected data sets and spatial data that can imported to various GIS software packages.

The guided and advanced search tool help users find what they are looking for more efficiently. The guided search prompts users with five popular queries and drills down into topics, geographies and groups. For more experienced researchers the advanced search tool uses key word search queries and displays results across data sets.

Why is this an All-Star?

CDC Wonder

http://wonder.cdc.gov

Description

CDC Wonder is a wide-ranging group of online databases for Epidemiological Research. A rich ad-hoc query system helps public health professionals search and analyze their vast variety of health data.

CDC WonderCDC Wonder is a wide-ranging group of online databases for epidemiological research. A rich ad-hoc query system helps public health professionals search and analyze  the vast variety of health data.

Researchers customize their findings with all kinds of public health from major health topics including environment, mortality, and population. The site also houses ample information on how-to use the data. Every report comes with notes and the suggested citation for academic papers or other republishing. You can make tables, maps, and charts with your selection of data.

In addition to entering complex queries, researchers also can download data sets to excel, Microsoft Access, and SAS. Epidemiologists accustomed to using Epi Info, a desktop application that provides special research tools, can use data from CDC Wonder.

Although this a science-savvy site meant for researchers, the available data are so far-reaching that anyone interested in public health data visualizations should at least be aware of it.

Why is this an All-Star?

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/

Description

The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices, and health care access primarily related to chronic disease and injury. For many states, the BRFSS is the only available source of timely, accurate data on health-related behaviors.

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices, and health care access primarily related to chronic disease and injury. For many states, the BRFSS is the only available source of timely, accurate data on health-related behaviors.”

The BFRSS website provides support materials, resources, and comprehensive behavioral health-risk data for all 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and Palau. The data can be viewed in state- and local-level maps and through prevalence tables. Users can export the data to Excel, and for those who want to build their own visualizations, several data sets are available for bulk download in ActionScript format.

BRFSS is a great resource for researchers, as the questionnaires, methodology and documentation all are available.  They also provide a Web Enabled Analysis Tool to let researchers perform complex logistic analysis.

Why is this an All-Star?

Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health

http://childhealthdata.org/

Description

The mission of the Data Resource Center (DRC) is to take the voices of parents, gathered through the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), and share the results through this free online resource

Data Resource Center for Child & Adolescent Health

The Data Resource Center (DRC)-sponsored by the Health Resources & Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau-provides free, easy to use data sets for the 2003, 2007 and 2011/12 National Surveys of Children’s Health and the 2001, 2005/06 and 2009/10 National Surveys of Children with Special Health Care Needs.

“The mission of the Data Resource Center is to take the voices of parents, gathered through the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), and share the results through this free online resource.”

The DRC site provides national and state-level data on over 200 child health factors and indicators from their national surveys. The system is easy-to-use and comprehensive. Users can search by topic and drill down to specific questions from the survey, view the data in table, bar graph or pie chart format and download to PDF. The topics pages link to PDF content maps which explain how the indicators are organized and come together. Users can also view state ranking maps, state snapshots, and nationwide data trends.

Besides data, the site also offers ways to put the data into action to improve children’s health. They also have examples of how the data has been used, presentations and chartbooks.  This site is especially valuable to people in government or communications who are not experts in statistics or health data.

Why is this an All-Star?

DiversityData.org

http://diversitydata.sph.harvard.edu

Description

Diversity Data showcases over 100 measures of diversity, opportunity, and quality of life for 362 metropolitan areas.

Diversity Data

 

DiversityData.org showcases over 100 measures of diversity, opportunity, and quality of life for 362 metropolitan areas.

Indicator topics include health, crime, economic factors and demographics. Users can view the data in ranking, map, bar graph or histogram by metro area or topic. The data can be downloaded to PDF or  shared on social networks. This site is unique in its concentration on metropolitan areas and issues. The project hopes to build upon recent work on urban inequality and health inequality and point to significant racial/ethnic disparities in health, education, employment and housing opportunities.

Why is this an All-Star?

Health System Data Center

http://datacenter.commonwealthfund.org

Description

The Health System Data Center is another state ranking site that concentrates on access to healthcare, prevention and treatment, avoidable hospital use and costs and healthy lives.

Health System Data Center

The Health System Data Center is a state ranking site that concentrates on access to healthcare, prevention and treatment, avoidable hospital use and costs and healthy lives.

The site organizes each state in three separate rankings, State Health System Ranking, Child Health Ranking and Local Area Ranking. The State Health System ranking data set assesses states’ performance on health care for 38 indicators. State comparisons can be viewed in list or graph view, with more than four states. The Child Health Ranking data set examines state’s performance on 20 key indicators of children’s health. The Local Area Ranking is organized by hospital referral region.

Every ranking has an “Estimated Impact of Improvement” estimate, which tells the story of how states could perform on key indicators if they improved to the level of the best-performing state. Users also can create an account and save their graphs or charts to a library, in order to save data to view again when they return. Every chart or graph can exported to PowerPoint or shared on social networks.

This site is great for newcomers to the health data world, as it is easy to understand and visually appealing.

Why is this an All-Star?

National Health Interview Survey

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

Description

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS data on a broad range of health topics are collected through personal household interviews. For over 50 years, the U.S. Census Bureau has been the data collection agent for the National Health Interview Survey. Survey results have been instrumental in providing data to track health status, health care access, and progress toward achieving national health objectives.

“The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS data on a broad range of health topics are collected through personal household interviews. For over 50 years, the U.S. Census Bureau has been the data collection agent for the National Health Interview Survey. Survey results have been instrumental in providing data to track health status, health care access, and progress toward achieving national health objectives.”

NHIS publishes survey results into PDF format. Users can access reports from 1963 to present day. NHIS data is used widely throughout the Department of Health and Human Services and by the public health research community for epidemiological and policy analysis of relevant health issues. The design of the survey works to display health characteristics along with demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. As part of this effort, the survey sample works to include special populations of people with disabilities and gain insights on their prevalence and needs.

Oral Health Data Systems

http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/data_systems/index.htm

Description

The CDC's Oral health data systems monitor the prevalence of oral diseases and the factors influencing oral health, such as risky or protective behaviors, the availability of preventive interventions and utilization of preventive services. The systems bring together existing data from multiple national and state sources and present the data in useful and accessible formats for the broad community interested in promoting oral health.

“The CDC’s Oral health data systems monitor the prevalence of oral diseases and the factors influencing oral health, such as risky or protective behaviors, the availability of preventive interventions and utilization of preventive services. The systems bring together existing data from multiple national and state sources and present the data in useful and accessible formats for the broad community interested in promoting oral health.”

This site compiles existing data sets on oral health in the U.S., including on water fluoridation, dental public health programs, and more.

One key feature is the Oral Health Maps application, which presents indicators of oral health and preventive interventions. Users can view nationwide maps of dental related data and drill down to individual states to view their data.

Why is this an All-Star?

RWJF DataHub

http://www.rwjf.org/en/research-publications/research-features/rwjf-datahub.html

Description

The RWJF DataHub tracks state-level data and allows users to customize and visualize facts and figures on key health and health care topics. The site is part of the foundation’s commitment to providing timely, accessible information and evidence to inform policies and practices that help Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need. It establishes a system of priority measures for monitoring state-level progress toward improving the nation’s health and health care.

The RWJF DataHub tracks state-level data and allows users to customize and visualize facts and figures on key health and health care topics. It’s part of the Foundation’s commitment to providing timely, accessible information and evidence to inform policies and practices that help Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need. The site establishes a system of priority measures for monitoring state-level progress toward improving the nation’s health and health care.

The sleek design makes it simple for users to pick a category, indicator and location to view data. The National DataHub has a map and ranking view while the view for each state includes line and bar graphs and tables. Users can download the data to excel spreadsheets or share the data on their social networks. Each indicator has a description, notes and source information. The indicators includes topics in health care access, cost and quality, public health, and social determinants of health.

This site is very easy to use for people looking for health information by state.

Why is this an All-Star?

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

http://www.samhsa.gov/data/

Description

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) works to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. As an initiative funded under contract with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the site stores a wide range of data related to substance abuse and mental health.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) works to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America’s communities.  As an initiative funded under contract with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, their site stores a wide range of data related to substance abuse and mental health.

Users can view reports by topic and drill down into more specific topics and see charts, maps and reports. The site offers several data collection systems and publications.

Why is this an All-Star?

Why Not the Best

http://www.whynotthebest.org

Description

Why Not the Best is a free resource for health care professionals interested in tracking performance on various measures of health care quality. The website enables organizations to compare their performance to peer organizations, or to benchmarks, and to view data over time.

WhyNotTheBest.org is a free resource for health care professionals interested in tracking performance on various measures of health care quality. The website enables organizations to compare their performance to peer organizations, or to benchmarks, and to view data over time.

Users can compare hospitals, groups, and regions and see the data in bar or trend graphs or maps. By creating an account, users can save reports and export them to Excel. The map view offers overlays to show hospital types, physician recognitions, and quality improvement areas (including accountable care organizations, Beacon communities, medical homes, and chartered value exchanges).

Besides data, WhyNotTheBest.org, has an Improvement Tools and Resources section with case studies, tools, related publications spotlighting successful improvement strategies of the nation’s top performers. Users not only can find information about how their region’s hospitals stack up against others, but also proven ways to make healthcare more effective.

Although each indicator is defined and organized in an easy to understand fashion, this site is primarily for qualified healthcare professionals looking to measure hospital performance and improve in areas where needed.

Why is this an All-Star?

AskCHIS

http://www.askchis.com

Description

AskCHIS is a California-specific data tool that allows you to quickly search for health statistics on your county, region and the state. AskCHIS draws upon the responses of more than 50,000 Californians interviewed by The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) - the largest state health survey in the United States.

AskCHIS is a data tool that allows you to quickly search for health statistics on California counties, regions, some cities and statewide. AskCHIS draws upon the responses of more than 50,000 Californians interviewed by the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) – the largest state health survey in the United States. Because of California’s diverse population, the survey is used by researchers across the nation and around the world to study the health of many racial and ethnic groups.

Users can filter the data by state, region, county, some large cities, and choose from nearly 100 health topics. The results can be viewed in tables, pie charts and line graphs.

The CHIS survey is conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, which offers the data and related publications for free on their website.

Why is this an All-Star?

Global Health Data Exchange

http://ghdx.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/

Description

The Global Health Data Exchange (GHDx) is a data catalog created and supported by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), an independent global health research center at the University of Washington.

The Global Health Data Exchange (GHDx) is a data catalog created and supported by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), an independent global health research center at the University of Washington.

This site offers a wide variety of health data from over 200 countries. Each country has a profile page which lists the data sets from that country, plus basic information like population and development status. Users can search for data by data type, keyword, organization, and more. Most of the data lives on other sites, but GHDx provides background information on the data set source and the citation. IHME has some original datasets they produce, and that users can download to Excel and CSV formats.

Why is this an All-Star?

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/

Description

Co-sponsored by NIDCR and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Data Resource Center (DRC) serves as a central repository for oral health-related data from the National Health Interview Survey, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The DRC's Data Query System allows users to search these surveys – including procedures used and survey questions asked – or generate rapid analyses of selected dental and oral health data.

 

NIDCR

 

“Co-sponsored by NIDCR and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Data Resource Center (DRC) serves as a central repository for oral health-related data from the National Health Interview Survey, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. The DRC’s Data Query System allows users to search these surveys – including procedures used and survey questions asked – or generate rapid analyses of selected dental and oral health data.”

Why is this an All-Star?

Global Health Observatory

http://www.who.int/research/en/

Description

The GHO data repository provides access to over 50 datasets on priority health topics, including mortality and burden of diseases, the Millennium Development Goals (child nutrition, child health, maternal and reproductive health, immunization, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, neglected diseases, water and sanitation), non communicable diseases and risk factors, epidemic-prone diseases, health systems, environmental health, violence and injuries, and equity among others. In addition, the GHO provides online access to WHO's annual summary of health-related data for its 194 member states: the World Health Statistics 2012.

who-global-health-repo

“The GHO data repository provides access to over 50 datasets on priority health topics, including mortality and burden of diseases, the Millennium Development Goals (child nutrition, child health, maternal and reproductive health, immunization, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, neglected diseases, water and sanitation), non communicable diseases and risk factors, epidemic-prone diseases, health systems, environmental health, violence and injuries, and equity among others. In addition, the GHO provides online access to WHO’s annual summary of health-related data for its 194 member states: the World Health Statistics 2012.”

Users can search this site by health topic, country and dataset. Each health topic has a page with background information, fact sheets, WHO programs and activities and technical information. Once users drill down to specific data the tables can be filtered by country, year and region. The data can be downloaded to CSV, Excel, or XML formats.

This is a great resource for researchers interested in pressing health topics around the world.

Why is this an All-Star?

American Hospital Association DataViewer

http://www.ahadataviewer.com/

Description

The American Hospital Association (AHA) DataViewer offers quick, easy access to AHA’s proprietary information from the AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals, IT Supplement Survey and membership data. Users can create custom data reports comparing hospitals and healthcare information.

aha-health-viewer

The American Hospital Association (AHA) DataViewer offers quick, easy access to AHA’s proprietary information from the AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals, IT Supplement Survey and membership data. Users can create custom data reports comparing hospitals and healthcare information.

The AHA Annual Survey includes more than 1,000 data fields on 6,500 hospitals. The datasets date back to 1980, so users also can create and chart hospital trends, develop healthcare forecasts, and more. The last five years of hospital data are available online. All hospitals have free profiles with basic information such as ownership type, total beds, and number of outpatient visits.

Why is this an All-Star?

CalHospital Compare.org

http://www.calhospitalcompare.org

Description

CalHospital Compare provides ratings on the quality of care, including clinical quality, patient experience, and patient safety, for hospitals in California.

ca-hospital-compare

 

CalHospitalCompare.org provides ratings on the quality of care, including clinical quality, patient experience, and patient safety, for hospitals in California.

Users can search by hospital name, location or condition, and compare up to five hospitals. The data are presented in easy-to-read tables with clickable explanations for each measurement. The measurements are also tagged with icons that indicate if the hospital is above or below the state average. Users also can see nearby hospitals and non-participating hospitals in the area.

This site’s target audience is health care consumers seeking more information – particularly quality-related information – about hospitals in California.

Why is this an All-Star?

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

http://meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/

Description

The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), which began in 1996, is a set of large-scale surveys of families and individuals, their medical providers (doctors, hospitals, pharmacies, etc.), and employers across the United States. MEPS collects data on the specific health services that Americans use, how frequently they use them, the cost of these services, and how they are paid for, as well as data on the cost, scope, and breadth of health insurance held by and available to U.S. workers.

meps

“The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), which began in 1996, is a set of large-scale surveys of families and individuals, their medical providers (doctors, hospitals, pharmacies, etc.), and employers across the United States. MEPS collects data on the specific health services that Americans use, how frequently they use them, the cost of these services, and how they are paid for, as well as data on the cost, scope, and breadth of health insurance held by and available to U.S. workers.”

The site contains analyses of MEPS data, summary data tables, and more. Users can create tables and graphs with the questionnaire data.

Researchers and programmers come to the site to download entire datasets, including documentation, codebooks and programming statements files. Tie site also offers SAS programming examples with the data.

Why is this an All-Star?

Medicare Claims Synthetic Public Use Files

http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/SynPUFs/

Description

Medicare Claims Synthetic Public Use Files (SynPUFs) were created to allow interested parties to gain familiarity using Medicare claims data while protecting beneficiary privacy. The data structure of the Medicare SynPUFs is very similar to the CMS Limited Data Sets, but with a smaller number of variables. They provide data analysts and software developers the opportunity to develop programs and products utilizing the identical formats and variable names as those which appear in the actual CMS data files.

SynPUFs

“Medicare Claims Synthetic Public Use Files (SynPUFs) were created to allow interested parties to gain familiarity using Medicare claims data while protecting beneficiary privacy.  The data structure of the Medicare SynPUFs is very similar to the CMS Limited Data Sets, but with a smaller number of variables.  They provide data analysts and software developers the opportunity to develop programs and products utilizing the identical formats and variable names as those which appear in the actual CMS data files.  The files have been designed so that programs and procedures created on the SynPUFs will function on CMS Limited Data Sets. The SynPUFs also provide a robust set of metadata on the CMS claims data that have not been available in the public domain.  After developmental work has been completed potential users should be much better informed about which CMS data products they would need to acquire to fulfill their analytic needs.”

CalQuality Care

http://www.calqualitycare.org/

Description

CalQuality Care offers information on nursing homes, residential care facilities, hospice, and other long-term care facilities in California.

ca-quality-care

 

CalQualityCare.org offers information on nursing homes, residential care facilities, hospice, and other long-term care facilities in California.

Users can search by location or provider name. Contact and basic information is provided about each center, as well as quality ratings and other data, when available. The site’s goal is to help consumers access quality-related data about long-term care facilities in California.

Why is this an All-Star?

Nursing Home Compare

http://www.medicare.gov/NursingHomeCompare/

Description

As part of Medicare.gov, Nursing Home Compare has detailed information about every Medicare and Medicaid-certified nursing home in the country, over 15,000 nationwide. The data comes from the CMS's Health Inspection database and the National database know as the Minimum Data Set, they measure ratings on overall care, health inspection, and staffing.

nursinghomecompare

As part of Medicare.gov, Nursing Home Compare has detailed information about every Medicare and Medicaid-certified nursing home in the country, over 15,000 nationwide. The data comes from the CMS Health Inspection database and the National database know as the Minimum Data Set, which measure ratings on overall care, health inspection and staffing.

Users can search by location or nursing home name, drill down to individual nursing homes and view their ratings, contact information and location on a map. There is ample information on the data, how it was collected and the meanings behind the ratings. The site also provide plenty of resources on how choosing a nursing home. Datasets can be downloaded into CSV zip files.

Why is this an All-Star?

County Health Calculator

http://countyhealthcalculator.org

Description

The County Health Calculator is a data visualization tool that illustrates how education and income affect health outcomes.

county-health-calculator (1)

 

The County Health Calculator is a data visualization tool that illustrates how education and income affect health outcomes.

Users can drill down to states or counties and see the deaths per year, persons with diabetes, and diabetes costs. The data is displayed in bar graph format, and offers movable sliders. When the slider tool is moved, a computer program uses a regression equation to estimate the proportional change in death rate or diabetes prevalence based on the proposed change in the education or income level.

Why is this an All-Star?

Global Burden of Disease Compare

http://viz.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd-compare/

Description

The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) approach is a systematic, scientific effort to quantify the comparative magnitude of health loss over time due to diseases, injuries, and risk factors by age, sex, and geography. GDB Compare is an online tool that visualizes data from the latest Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010).

GBD Compare

The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) approach is a systematic, scientific effort to quantify the comparative magnitude of health loss over time due to diseases, injuries, and risk factors by age, sex, and geography. GDB Compare is an online tool that visualizes data from the latest Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 (GBD 2010).

Users can view the data in a bar chart, heat map, time or age plot, or tree map. They customize the metric (health indicator), place, age group and sex. They can also change the unit of measurement and metric. This tool displays two charts at once for easy comparisons. The charts can be shared with unique links, through screenshots, and on social networks.

Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey

http://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Research/MCBS/index.html?redirect=/MCBS

Description

The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) is a continuous, multipurpose survey of a nationally representative sample of the Medicare population, conducted by the Office of Information Products and Data Analysis (OIPDA) of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through a contract with Westat. The central goals of MCBS are to determine expenditures and sources of payment for all services used by Medicare beneficiaries, including co-payments, deductibles, and non-covered services; to ascertain all types of health insurance coverage and relate coverage to sources of payment; and to trace processes over time, such as changes in health status and spending down to Medicaid eligibility and the impacts of program changes, satisfaction with care, and usual source of care.

beneficiarysurv

“The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) is a continuous, multipurpose survey of a nationally representative sample of the Medicare population, conducted by the Office of Information Products and Data Analysis (OIPDA) of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through a contract with Westat. The central goals of MCBS are to determine expenditures and sources of payment for all services used by Medicare beneficiaries, including co-payments, deductibles, and non-covered services; to ascertain all types of health insurance coverage and relate coverage to sources of payment; and to trace processes over time, such as changes in health status and spending down to Medicaid eligibility and the impacts of program changes, satisfaction with care, and usual source of care.”

There are two data files from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) that are released in annual Access to Care and Cost and Use files, which can be purchased directly from CMS.

Why is this an All-Star?

Agency for Health Care Research and Quality Hopsital Discharge Data

http://hcupnet.ahrq.gov/

Description

HCUPnet is a free, online query system based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). It provides access to health statistics and information on hospital inpatient and emergency department utilization.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

“HCUPnet is a free, online query system based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). It provides access to health statistics and information on hospital inpatient and emergency department utilization. Using HCUPnet’s step-by-step query system, users can generate tables and graphs on national and regional statistics and trends for community hospitals in the U.S. In addition, community hospital data are available for those states that have agreed to participate in HCUPnet.”

This query system offers clear definitions at every step to help user understand what data they are selecting. Users can then view the data in a results page, download the data to an Excel spreadsheet, or repeat the query  with a different year’s database.

Why is this an All-Star?

Health System Management Project

https://healthmeasures.aspe.hhs.gov/

Description

The Health System Management Project brings together trend data for key health system measures from multiple data sources, in order to provide a picture of the status of the U.S. health system.

healthsysmeasproj

The Health System Management Project brings together trend data for key health system measures from multiple data sources, in order to provide a picture of the status of the U.S. health system. The Project focuses on ten critical dimensions of our health care system that cover the availability, quality, and cost of care, the overall health of Americans, and the dynamism of the system.

Why is this an All-Star?

Child Trends

http://www.childtrendsdatabank.org/

Description

This site houses data on a number of topics related to child well-being. For each topic, users can search resources by year, title and keyword/author. Most of the reports are in PDF format. Some of the reports are also presented with graphs and summary text.

child-trends

Founded in 1979, Child Trends helps keep the nation focused on children and their needs by identifying emerging issues; evaluating important programs and policies; and providing data-driven, evidence-based guidance on policy and practice.

This site houses data on a number of topics related to child well-being. For each topic, users can search resources by year, title and keyword/author. Most of the reports are in PDF format. Some of the reports are also presented with graphs and summary text.

Why is this an All-Star?

Community Commons

http://www.communitycommons.org/

Description

Community Commons is an interactive mapping, networking, and learning utility for the broad-based healthy, sustainable, and livable communities’ movement. Users must sign up for a free account to access all kinds of data and tools.

community-commons

Community Commons is an interactive mapping, networking, and learning utility for the broad-based healthy, sustainable, and livable communities’ movement. Users must sign up for a free account to access all kinds of data and tools.

This site offers a community of innovators that share and create data, data visualizations, and shareable resources. Users can also come to the site to make their own maps and reports.

HealthyCity

http://www.healthycity.org/

Description

Healthy City provides data and mapping tools to help Californians build a better community. The Healthy City team also partners directly with organizations to develop research strategies and web tools that fuel social change.

HealthyCity

Healthy City provides data and mapping tools to help Californians build a better community. The Healthy City team also partners directly with organizations to develop research strategies and web tools that fuel social change.

The data directory is the home to many different California public datasets. Users can create charts, tables and graphs with data on various public health topics. They can also compare multiple counties, regions, zip codes, or cities for these topics.

Maps and mapping tools are available for users to create maps with the data. After adding data and customizing the map, users can download their creation to Word.

This is a community site where users can create accounts to share their contact information, connect with other users, and even upload their own data.

Why is this an All-Star?

Hospital Compare

http://www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare/

Description

Hospital Compare offers details about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. Users can find hospitals and compare the quality of their care. By offering consumers with easy access to hospital quality data, one goal of the site is to encourage hospitals to improve the quality of care they provide.

medicare-hospital-compare

Hospital Compare offers details about the quality of care at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country. Users can find hospitals and compare the quality of their care. By offering consumers with easy access to hospital quality data, one goal of the site is to encourage hospitals to improve the quality of care they provide.

Users can search by zip code, city or state or by hospital name and compare up to three hospitals at a time. The data come from the Hospital Quality Initiative, which uses a variety of tools to help stimulate and support improvements for hospitals. Data can be viewed in tables or bar graphs.

Why is this an All-Star?

National Institute of Mental Health

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/statistics/index.shtml

Description

This website offers an extensive collection of the institute's statistics on the prevalence, treatment, and costs of mental disorders. Also useful are sections on mental health-related disabilities and suicide.

NIHmentalhealth

This website offers an extensive collection of the institute’s statistics on the prevalence, treatment, and costs of mental disorders. Also useful are sections on mental health-related disabilities and suicide.

This easy-to-use site helps users find charts based on prevalence, disability, suicide and cost. Available graphs can be downloaded to PDFs.

Why is this an All-Star?

State Health Access Data Assistance Center – Data Center

http://www.shadac.org/datacenter

Description

The State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) provides a web-based table generator tool that allows users to customize tables and graphs of health insurances coverage estimates.

shadac

The State Health Access Data Assistance Center (SHADAC) provides a web-based table generator tool that allows users to  customize tables and graphs of health insurances coverage estimates.

Tables provide detailed health insurance coverage estimates for the nation and any selected state. Users can choose to create multi-state overview tables or more detailed state tables.

Graphs offer a visual display of top-line estimates or demographic trends. Users can easily compare up to ten states at  time. Users can download images, share with social networks, or save results.

Why is this an All-Star?

The Office On Women’s Health: Quick Health Data Online

http://www.healthstatus2020.com/index.html

Description

Quick Health Data Online is an interactive system that provides reliable and easily accessible health data to help assess needs, develop programs, and inform policies. The system is for anyone looking for US health data and is used by the public health community, policymakers, grant writers, researchers, and students.

Women's health

“Quick Health Data Online is an interactive system that provides reliable and easily accessible health data to help assess needs, develop programs, and inform policies. The system is for anyone looking for US health data and is used by the public health community, policymakers, grant writers, researchers, and students.

The system provides state- and county-level data for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and US territories and possessions. Data are available by gender, race and ethnicity and come from a variety of national and state sources.”

Area Resource File

http://arf.hrsa.gov/

Description

The county-specific Area Resource File (ARF) is a database containing more than 6,000 variables for each of the nation's counties. ARF contains information on health facilities, health professions, measures of resource scarcity, health status, economic activity, health training programs, and socioeconomic and environmental characteristics.

2013-05-31_1059

The county-specific Area Resource File (ARF) is a database containing more than 6,000 variables for each of the nation’s counties. ARF contains information on health facilities, health professions, measures of resource scarcity, health status, economic activity, health training programs, and socioeconomic and environmental characteristics.

In addition, the basic file contains geographic codes and descriptors, which enable it to be linked to many other files and to aggregate counties into various geographic groupings.

Why is this an All-Star?

Find the Best

http://www.findthebest.com/category/Health

Description

findthebest

Find the Best is a tool for consumers that let’s access the most current, unbiased and easy-to-understand data. They cover nine broad categories of which is health. They use reviews from experts and facts about the product and service  – and combine them into one overall score. The data comes from public or licensed databases, primary sources and experts in their relative industries.

The health data includes consumer focused information on clinics, facilities and centers, doctors, and nutrition. Users can search by topic and location. The system also has selected popular searches based on what users have searched for before.  Each product can be rated, compared with others, and view on a map. Each topic also has a guide and an expert blog for more background information.

Health Landscape

http://www.healthlandscape.org

Description

HealthLandscape is an interactive web-based mapping tool that allows health professionals, policy makers, academic researchers, and planners to combine, analyze and display information in ways that promote better understanding of health and the forces that affect it.

healthlandscape

 

“HealthLandscape is an interactive web-based mapping tool that allows health professionals, policy makers, academic researchers, and planners to combine, analyze and display information in ways that promote better understanding of health and the forces that affect it. The tool brings together various sources of health, socio-economic and environmental information in a convenient, central location to help answer questions about and improve health and healthcare. HealthLandscape can be used to create maps from publicly available data sets including regional criminal justice, education, healthcare, and demographic data, allowing users to discover community characteristics and share information with health professionals, policy makers, and legislators.”

Mostly a mapping tool users can create custom maps and tables of the status of communities. There are tools for quick geocodes, themes and custom applications. Users can upload their own data from excel spreadsheet and other formats to create their own maps as well.

Kids Data

http://www.kidsdata.org

Description

KidsData.org provides comprehensive data about the health and well being of children across California. There is data for every city, county, and school district in the state.

kidshealth

KidsData.org provides comprehensive data about the health and well being of children across California. There is data for every city, county, and school district in the state. As a program of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, it promotes the health of children.

KidsData.org shares data on more than 400 measures of child health and well being, from more than 35 trusted public sources. Researchers, policy-makers, parents and educator can compile data into reports, presentations, grant proposals, policy decisions, media stories. Users can search by region, demographic group or topic. They can view the data in various formats from table to pie chart and download it into a PDF or Excel file.

Why is this an All-Star?

Minnesota Population Center

http://www.ipums.org/

Description

The Minnesota Population Center is one of the world's leading developer of comprehensive demographic data resources. They have several projects and data series related to public health.

MPC

The Minnesota Population Center is one of the world’s leading developer of comprehensive demographic data resources. They have several projects and data series related to public health.

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) is a set of harmonized data for 1960 forward, covering 480 million people in 211 censuses from 68 countries around the world. The IPUMS from the United States covers census data and American Community Survey data from 1850 and onward. This data is meant for researcher and programmer looking for comprehensive health and population data.

Why is this an All-Star?

University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study (HRS)

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/index.php?p=reg

Description

This is the Web site for the Health and Retirement Study, a major national panel study of the lives of older Americans. The Health and Retirement Study includes the "original" HRS study (data collection in 1992, 1994, and 1996) and the "AHEAD" study (data collections in 1993 and 1995).

HRS

The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a major national panel study of the lives of older Americans. The HRS site have a visual displays of HRS data collection efforts, past present and future. It is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The HRS explores the changes in labor force participation and the health transitions that individuals undergo toward the end of their work lives and in the years that follow.

The HRS includes the “original” HRS study (data collection in 1992, 1994, and 1996) and the “AHEAD” study (data collections in 1993 and 1995). These studies were merged in 1998 and now represent the U.S. population over age 50 in 1998. Two new cohorts were added in 1998: the Children of the Depression (1924-1930) and the War Babies (1942-1947). A fourth cohort, Early Baby Boomers (1948-1953), was added in 2004 and a fifth cohort, Mid Boomers (1954-1959), was added in 2010.

Users have to register, and then, can access all data from the survey. They can download each set into statistical analysis tools and other formats.

Cal Dept. of Public Health and Education Data sites

http://www.cdph.ca.gov/data/pages/default.aspx

Description

"Data" provides access to public health data and information, such as queries, resources, statistics, surveys, informatics, GIS, and health indicators. (Basically a California data hub)

The California Department of Public Health data sites provide access to public health data and information, such as queries, resources, statistics, surveys, informatics, GIS, and health indicators.

Governor O’Malley’s StateStat

https://data.maryland.gov/goals

Description

StateStat is a performance-measurement and management tool implemented by Governor Martin O'Malley to make the Maryland state government more accountable and more efficient.

Screen Shot 2013-06-03 at 8.55.42 AM

StateStat is a performance-measurement and management tool implemented by Governor Martin O’Malley to make the Maryland state government more accountable and more efficient. The site is modeled after the CitiStat program that O’Malley’s team developed when he served as Mayor of Baltimore City. The CitiStat program has been studied and emulated by countless jurisdictions from around the globe. CitiStat received the “Innovations in Government” Award by Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, and now Governor O’Malley is bringing these same principles to the management of statewide services.

The Goals section provides data dashboards that demonstrate the states progress on health issues including childhood hunger, health IT, infant mortality, and substance abuse. The dashboards include an odometer showing overall progress, and figures, charts, and maps for key indicators.

NYC Open Data

https://nycopendata.socrata.com/brow....0RSGSxLO.dpuf

Description

StateStat is a performance-measurement and management tool implemented by Governor Martin O'Malley to make the Maryland state government more accountable and more efficient.

Screen Shot 2013-06-03 at 9.10.30 AM

 

“NYC Open Data makes the wealth of public data generated by various New York City agencies and other City organizations available for public use. As part of an initiative to improve the accessibility, transparency, and accountability of City government, this catalog offers access to a repository of government-produced, machine-readable data sets.”

Health data such as birth rates, location of healthcare providers, and Medicaid buy-in program income levels are available in tables, charts, maps, and more. These data can also be exported in a variety of formats.

California Healthy Kids Survey

http://chks.wested.org/

Description

The California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) is a powerful tool for use in Grades 5-12 that can help schools and districts accurately identify areas of student and school strengths and weaknesses, and address related needs. It provides a comprehensive, data-driven, decision-making process to guide efforts to improve school climate, learning supports, and engagement, as well as identify and increase the quality of health, prevention, and youth development programs.

The California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) is a powerful tool for use in Grades 5-12 that can help schools and districts accurately identify areas of student and school strengths and weaknesses, and address related needs. It provides a comprehensive, data-driven, decision-making process to guide efforts to improve school climate, learning supports, and engagement, as well as identify and increase the quality of health, prevention, and youth development programs.

Users can not only find information about the survey and administer it, but they can also query results. Users search the data by topic and can select to view the data in a table, trend line, map, bar or pie graph. Users can drill down to specific counties or school districts and compare up to eight at a time.

Why is this an All-Star?

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