Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 GIS Data Science for Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond
    2. Slide 2 Background
    3. Slide 3 Purpose
    4. Slide 4 Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge
    5. Slide 5 GIS&T BOK 1.0 Knowledge Base
    6. Slide 6 Google Earth Browser
    7. Slide 7 Google Earth Applications
    8. Slide 8 Google Maps
    9. Slide 9 Google Earth to Shape File
    10. Slide 10 ArcGIS Online
    11. Slide 11 ArcGIS Online Free 30-Day Trial
    12. Slide 12 ESRI Maps for Office
    13. Slide 13 Data.gov New Catalog Example
    14. Slide 14 ECSTDB2005 - U.S. Geological Survey East Coast Sediment Texture Database (2005)
    15. Slide 15 USGS GIS Data Catalog 1
    16. Slide 16 USGS GIS Data Catalog 2
    17. Slide 17 Ecstdb2011.xls Excel Data Set
    18. Slide 18 Spotfire Data Ecosystem
    19. Slide 19 Spotfire With World Country Shape Files
    20. Slide 20 Spotfire Spatial Statistics
    21. Slide 21 Spotfire With Images, Shape & Excel Files
    22. Slide 22 Summary and Next Steps
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Storytelling with Maps: Workflows and Best Practices
    1. Introduction
    2. Anatomy of a Story map
    3. The Process
      1. 1. Develop a Storyboard
      2. 2. Gather Data
      3. 3. Create a Web Map or Maps
        1. 3a. Choose a Basemap
          1. Topographic
          2. National Geographic
          3. Light Gray Canvas
          4. Streets
          5. Imagery
          6. Oceans
        2. 3b. Assemble the Map
        3. 3c. Adjust and Refine the Map
          1. Adjust cartography
        4. 3d. Configure Pop-Ups
        5. 3e. Adjust symbols for point data
        6. 3f. Save the map
      4. 4. Share the Web Map
      5. 5. Publish the Story Map
        1. Embed the map or presentation
        2. Use an app template
        3. Develop a custom app
    4. Conclusion
  6. Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond
    1. Monday, May 20, 2013 - Pre-symposium Day
      1. Full Day Workshop
      2. Consecutive Tech Track Workshops
      3. Consecutive Collaboration Workshops
    2. Tuesday, May 21, 2013
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Presidential Keynote
      3. Welcoming Plenary Theme
      4. Break
      5. Plenary Panel
      6. Working Lunch and Council Meeting Briefings
      7. Plenary Talk
      8. Research Award Winner Plenary
      9. Break
      10. Report to the Community
      11. Committee Meetings
      12. Opening Reception
        1. Roger Tomlinson
        2. Barbara Buttenfield
        3. Robert McMaster
    3. Wednesday, May 22
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Plenary Theme
      3. Plenary Theme
      4. Break
      5. Plenary Panel
      6. Working Lunch/Second Council Meeting
      7. Plenary Talk
      8. Panel Session
      9. Break
      10. Student Research Papers
    4. Thursday, May 23
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Presentation of Education Award
      3. Education Plenary Theme
      4. Curriculum Standards Development
      5. Break
      6. GIS&T Knowledge Ecosystem
      7. Education Committee Meeting
      8. Working Lunch, includes Research Committee Meeting
      9. Research Plenary Talk
      10. Presented Papers: General Research
      11. Closing Remarks
      12. Complementary Coach to USGIF Meeting/Reception
  7. Call for Papers
  8. Call for Education Award Nominations
  9. Call for Research Award Nominations
  10. Call for Workshop Proposals
  11. USGS
    1. GIS DATA CATALOG (version 2.2)
    2. ArcGIS
    3. SURFICIAL SEDIMENT
    4. GEOLOGY
    5. BASEMAP DATA
  12. NEXT

GIS Data Science

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 GIS Data Science for Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond
    2. Slide 2 Background
    3. Slide 3 Purpose
    4. Slide 4 Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge
    5. Slide 5 GIS&T BOK 1.0 Knowledge Base
    6. Slide 6 Google Earth Browser
    7. Slide 7 Google Earth Applications
    8. Slide 8 Google Maps
    9. Slide 9 Google Earth to Shape File
    10. Slide 10 ArcGIS Online
    11. Slide 11 ArcGIS Online Free 30-Day Trial
    12. Slide 12 ESRI Maps for Office
    13. Slide 13 Data.gov New Catalog Example
    14. Slide 14 ECSTDB2005 - U.S. Geological Survey East Coast Sediment Texture Database (2005)
    15. Slide 15 USGS GIS Data Catalog 1
    16. Slide 16 USGS GIS Data Catalog 2
    17. Slide 17 Ecstdb2011.xls Excel Data Set
    18. Slide 18 Spotfire Data Ecosystem
    19. Slide 19 Spotfire With World Country Shape Files
    20. Slide 20 Spotfire Spatial Statistics
    21. Slide 21 Spotfire With Images, Shape & Excel Files
    22. Slide 22 Summary and Next Steps
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Storytelling with Maps: Workflows and Best Practices
    1. Introduction
    2. Anatomy of a Story map
    3. The Process
      1. 1. Develop a Storyboard
      2. 2. Gather Data
      3. 3. Create a Web Map or Maps
        1. 3a. Choose a Basemap
          1. Topographic
          2. National Geographic
          3. Light Gray Canvas
          4. Streets
          5. Imagery
          6. Oceans
        2. 3b. Assemble the Map
        3. 3c. Adjust and Refine the Map
          1. Adjust cartography
        4. 3d. Configure Pop-Ups
        5. 3e. Adjust symbols for point data
        6. 3f. Save the map
      4. 4. Share the Web Map
      5. 5. Publish the Story Map
        1. Embed the map or presentation
        2. Use an app template
        3. Develop a custom app
    4. Conclusion
  6. Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond
    1. Monday, May 20, 2013 - Pre-symposium Day
      1. Full Day Workshop
      2. Consecutive Tech Track Workshops
      3. Consecutive Collaboration Workshops
    2. Tuesday, May 21, 2013
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Presidential Keynote
      3. Welcoming Plenary Theme
      4. Break
      5. Plenary Panel
      6. Working Lunch and Council Meeting Briefings
      7. Plenary Talk
      8. Research Award Winner Plenary
      9. Break
      10. Report to the Community
      11. Committee Meetings
      12. Opening Reception
        1. Roger Tomlinson
        2. Barbara Buttenfield
        3. Robert McMaster
    3. Wednesday, May 22
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Plenary Theme
      3. Plenary Theme
      4. Break
      5. Plenary Panel
      6. Working Lunch/Second Council Meeting
      7. Plenary Talk
      8. Panel Session
      9. Break
      10. Student Research Papers
    4. Thursday, May 23
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Presentation of Education Award
      3. Education Plenary Theme
      4. Curriculum Standards Development
      5. Break
      6. GIS&T Knowledge Ecosystem
      7. Education Committee Meeting
      8. Working Lunch, includes Research Committee Meeting
      9. Research Plenary Talk
      10. Presented Papers: General Research
      11. Closing Remarks
      12. Complementary Coach to USGIF Meeting/Reception
  7. Call for Papers
  8. Call for Education Award Nominations
  9. Call for Research Award Nominations
  10. Call for Workshop Proposals
  11. USGS
    1. GIS DATA CATALOG (version 2.2)
    2. ArcGIS
    3. SURFICIAL SEDIMENT
    4. GEOLOGY
    5. BASEMAP DATA
  12. NEXT

  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 GIS Data Science for Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond
    2. Slide 2 Background
    3. Slide 3 Purpose
    4. Slide 4 Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge
    5. Slide 5 GIS&T BOK 1.0 Knowledge Base
    6. Slide 6 Google Earth Browser
    7. Slide 7 Google Earth Applications
    8. Slide 8 Google Maps
    9. Slide 9 Google Earth to Shape File
    10. Slide 10 ArcGIS Online
    11. Slide 11 ArcGIS Online Free 30-Day Trial
    12. Slide 12 ESRI Maps for Office
    13. Slide 13 Data.gov New Catalog Example
    14. Slide 14 ECSTDB2005 - U.S. Geological Survey East Coast Sediment Texture Database (2005)
    15. Slide 15 USGS GIS Data Catalog 1
    16. Slide 16 USGS GIS Data Catalog 2
    17. Slide 17 Ecstdb2011.xls Excel Data Set
    18. Slide 18 Spotfire Data Ecosystem
    19. Slide 19 Spotfire With World Country Shape Files
    20. Slide 20 Spotfire Spatial Statistics
    21. Slide 21 Spotfire With Images, Shape & Excel Files
    22. Slide 22 Summary and Next Steps
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Storytelling with Maps: Workflows and Best Practices
    1. Introduction
    2. Anatomy of a Story map
    3. The Process
      1. 1. Develop a Storyboard
      2. 2. Gather Data
      3. 3. Create a Web Map or Maps
        1. 3a. Choose a Basemap
          1. Topographic
          2. National Geographic
          3. Light Gray Canvas
          4. Streets
          5. Imagery
          6. Oceans
        2. 3b. Assemble the Map
        3. 3c. Adjust and Refine the Map
          1. Adjust cartography
        4. 3d. Configure Pop-Ups
        5. 3e. Adjust symbols for point data
        6. 3f. Save the map
      4. 4. Share the Web Map
      5. 5. Publish the Story Map
        1. Embed the map or presentation
        2. Use an app template
        3. Develop a custom app
    4. Conclusion
  6. Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond
    1. Monday, May 20, 2013 - Pre-symposium Day
      1. Full Day Workshop
      2. Consecutive Tech Track Workshops
      3. Consecutive Collaboration Workshops
    2. Tuesday, May 21, 2013
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Presidential Keynote
      3. Welcoming Plenary Theme
      4. Break
      5. Plenary Panel
      6. Working Lunch and Council Meeting Briefings
      7. Plenary Talk
      8. Research Award Winner Plenary
      9. Break
      10. Report to the Community
      11. Committee Meetings
      12. Opening Reception
        1. Roger Tomlinson
        2. Barbara Buttenfield
        3. Robert McMaster
    3. Wednesday, May 22
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Plenary Theme
      3. Plenary Theme
      4. Break
      5. Plenary Panel
      6. Working Lunch/Second Council Meeting
      7. Plenary Talk
      8. Panel Session
      9. Break
      10. Student Research Papers
    4. Thursday, May 23
      1. Welcoming Remarks
      2. Presentation of Education Award
      3. Education Plenary Theme
      4. Curriculum Standards Development
      5. Break
      6. GIS&T Knowledge Ecosystem
      7. Education Committee Meeting
      8. Working Lunch, includes Research Committee Meeting
      9. Research Plenary Talk
      10. Presented Papers: General Research
      11. Closing Remarks
      12. Complementary Coach to USGIF Meeting/Reception
  7. Call for Papers
  8. Call for Education Award Nominations
  9. Call for Research Award Nominations
  10. Call for Workshop Proposals
  11. USGS
    1. GIS DATA CATALOG (version 2.2)
    2. ArcGIS
    3. SURFICIAL SEDIMENT
    4. GEOLOGY
    5. BASEMAP DATA
  12. NEXT

Story

Slides

GIS Data Science forCollaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

A. Introduction

Attended: Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

My Note: Invited to attend one day as a journalist (I selected May 22 – Data Communities)

Learned about: Storytelling with Maps: Workflows and Best Practices, WorldMap, New Data.gov Catalog, GIS BOK, Are there fundamental principles in Geographic Information Science?Google Earth to Shape Files, ESRI Maps for Office, ARCGIS Online, Make a Map Tour Story MapStorytelling with Maps: Workflows and Best Practices

My Note: All of this gives me something for a data science product and story.

Suggested: A GIS Data Science team do a pilot for the Federal Big Data Senior Steering WG and help them with Work Force Development (train university students to be data scientists with big GIS data)

My Note: I suggested that to a GIS Ph.D. Candidate at the Conference and he thanked me for the suggestion!

Suggested: Making key publications compliant with the Digital Government Strategy

Are there fundamental principles in Geographic Information Science? (Still being sold, but is it copyrighted?)

My Note: Make notes on the Afterword by Michael Goodchild

GIS&T Body of Knowledge 1.0 (Free of charge and available as a PDF)

My Note: I did this. See slides and Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge

May 20-23, 2013 Conference Proceedings, Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

My Note: I did this. See slides and GIS Data Science

B. Key Publications

1. Are there fundamental principles in Geographic Information Science? (Still being sold, but is it copyrighted?)

Preface

Waldo Tobler

Introduction
Francis Harvey    

GIS Theory - The fundamental principles in GIScience: A mathematical approach
Andrew Frank

A deflationary approach to fundamental principles in GIScience    
Nicholas Chrisman

Beyond mathematics and the deflationary turn: fundamental concepts in GIScience – To whom and for what ends?
Dan Sui

Afterword    
Michael Goodchild

My Note: Notes on the Afterword by Michael Goodchild

A simple yes or no answer and the list of enumerated  principles - but none of the authors did that, but weaved interesting stories around simple questions like academics do. His answer is yes and to identify the principles that ground the courses he teaches in GIScience.

Tobler's First Law of Geography (TFL)

Cartographic Generalization (e.g. Mandlebrot's fractal principle)

Logical and Mathematical Argument (continuous flields and discrete objects)

Eigenhofer's 9-intersection

Hierarchical sturctures (quadtrees and global grids)

Spatial Heterogeneity (gegraphically weighted regression)

GIScientists need to be able to explain to others why their filed constitutes a science, to detail what it has discovered about its subject matter, and to explain why pursuing its research will benefit science and society at large.

In my case, an understanding of fundamental principles emerged only slowly after years of working with the technology. As the technology has become easier to use, and as many GIS functions are now available through simple user interfaces, we have the opportunity to place more emphasis on fundamental principles and concepts - to put the horse finally in front of the cart. I doubt we will ever agree on a single list, but let us at least agree that it is important that we as individuals make our own lists.

My Note: So the technology has become easier to use and data science with big data has come to the fore, and we can follow our own list of steps to produce data science products and stories!

2. GIS&T Body of Knowledge (Free of charge and available as a PDF and Wiki)

Organized thematically by “knowledge areas,” the GIS&T Body of Knowledge presents a broad diversity of topics, ranging from analytical  methods and data modeling to GIS&T in society. It is expected that this book and its subsequent editions will become an important reference work and classroom resource for teachers, students, and GIS&T professionals alike.

The Model Curricula is a vision of how higher education should prepare students for success in the variety of professions that rely upon geospatial technologies. Central to that vision is a comprehensive Body of Knowledge that specifies what aspiring geospatial professionals need to know and be able to do. Since 1998, scholars from many of the more than 80 institutions that UCGIS represents have contributed to the Geographic Information Science and Technology (GIS&T) Body of Knowledge.

Published by the Association of American Geographers in 2006, the GIS&T Body of Knowledge includes ten knowledge areas, 73 units, 329 topics, and over 1,600 formal educational objectives. The GIS&T Body of Knowledge will be useful as:

  • A resource for course and curriculum planning for academic and professional programs at four-year and two-year institutions.
  • A basis for comparison of educational programs by prospective students
  • A basis for professional certification (the GIS&T Body of Knowledge used by the GIS Certificate Institute to adjudicate applicants’ educational achievement point claims)
  • A basis for program accreditation
  • A basis for articulation agreements between and among two-year and four-year higher education institutions
  • A resource for human resources professionals seeking guidance in employee recruiting, selection, and continuing professional development.

Proposed timetable for completion of Model Curricula products

  • Summer 2006: Publication of the 1st edition of the GIS&T Body of Knowledge
  • 2007: Workshop organized to delineate curricular pathways for diverse professional objectives and institutional contexts; editorial board empaneled for 2nd edition of the GIS&T BoK
  • 2008: Publication of multi-author volume delineating curricular pathways
  • 2010: 2nd edition of the GIS&T Body of Knowledge

What is Geographic Information Science?: http://www.ncgia.ucsb.edu/giscc/units/u002/u002.html

The NCGIA Core Curriculum in GIScience: http://www.ncgia.ucsb.edu/education/curricula/giscc/gateway.html

My Note: They used a Wiki and then regressed to PDF files!

3.  May 20-23, 2013 Conference Proceedings

My Note: Waiting for slides and summary report

C. Summary and Next Steps

  • GIScience 2.0 and Beyond Needs Data Science  Collaboration Across Communities
  • GIS Data Science Needs Data Scientists Working with Big GIS Data in Teams On High-Value Government Business and Science Problems
  • Google Maps and ESRI GIS Online Are the Basic Tools for GIS Data Science, But Tools Like MindTouch and Spotfire Are Needed For Producing Products and Stories
  • This Will Revolutionize the Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge Version 2.0

Slides

Slides

Slide 1 GIS Data Science for Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

http://semanticommunity.info/
http://gov.aol.com/bloggers/brand-niemann/
http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science

BrandNiemann05282013Slide1.PNG

Slide 2 Background

http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science#Collaboration_Across_Communities:_GIScience_2.0_and_Beyond
http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science#Storytelling_with_Maps:_Workflows_and_Best_Practices
http://about.worldmap.harvard.edu/ic...keyword=k28501
http://catalog.data.gov/dataset
http://www.ucgis.org/priorities/educ...ulaproject.asp
http://gisci-concepts.org/
http://www.zonums.com/online/kml2shp.php
http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/...0000020000000/
http://www.arcgis.com/home/
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Arcgi...tour-story-map
http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science#Storytelling_with_Maps:_Workflows_and_Best_Practices

BrandNiemann05282013Slide2.PNG

Slide 3 Purpose

http://semanticommunity.info/Emerging_Technology_SIG_Big_Data_Committee/Government_Challenges_With_Big_Data
http://semanticommunity.info/AOL_Government/Building_a_Digital_Government
http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science/Geographic_Information_Science_and_Technology_Body_of_Knowledge
http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science#Collaboration_Across_Communities:_GIScience_2.0_and_Beyond
http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science

BrandNiemann05282013Slide3.PNG

Slide 4 Geographic Information Science and Technology Body of Knowledge

http://www.aag.org/bok/

BrandNiemann05282013Slide4.PNG

Slide 5 GIS&T BOK 1.0 Knowledge Base

http://semanticommunity.info/GIS_Data_Science/Geographic_Information_Science_and_Technology_Body_of_Knowledge

BrandNiemann05282013Slide5.PNG

Slide 9 Google Earth to Shape File

http://www.zonums.com/online/kml2shp.php

BrandNiemann05282013Slide9.PNG

Slide 10 ArcGIS Online

http://www.arcgis.com/home/

BrandNiemann05282013Slide10.PNG

Slide 11 ArcGIS Online Free 30-Day Trial

http://www.esri.com/software/esri-ma...ice/free-trial

BrandNiemann05282013Slide11.PNG

Slide 13 Data.gov New Catalog Example

http://catalog.data.gov/dataset?res_...res_format=ZIP

BrandNiemann05282013Slide13.PNG

Slide 17 Ecstdb2011.xls Excel Data Set

http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/openfil...ecstdb2011.xls

 

BrandNiemann05282013Slide17.PNG

Slide 18 Spotfire Data Ecosystem

Web Player

BrandNiemann05282013Slide18.PNG

Slide 19 Spotfire With World Country Shape Files

Web Player

BrandNiemann05282013Slide19.PNG

Slide 20 Spotfire Spatial Statistics

Web Player

BrandNiemann05282013Slide20.PNG

Slide 21 Spotfire With Images, Shape & Excel Files

Web Player

BrandNiemann05282013Slide21.PNG

Slide 22 Summary and Next Steps

BrandNiemann05282013Slide22.PNG

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Error: Embedded data could not be displayed. Use Google Chrome

Research Notes

PO Box 15079 | Alexandria, VA 22309
703-799-6698 (phone) | 703-780-2043 (fax) | Contact Us
Copyright 1996-2011 University Consortium for Geographic Information Science

UCGIS donate button UCGIS Listserve 

#AAG2013

Moellering Proposal for 22 by 70 Spatial Metadata Standards Matrix

My Note: Need to send

EarthCube - http://worldmap.harvard.edu - policy and collaboration - data science

http://warp.worldmap.harvard.edu/

My Note: KML files

AGILE - ontologies

My Note:

ESC - Japanese

My Note:

BoK 2 - Andre Skupin, Geography, San Diego State University

My Note:

SESAW - Luc Anselin

My Note:

CubeWerx

My Note:

Doug Nebert - new Data.gov Catalog

My Note: See Wiki

ESRI - Community Maps

http://storymaps.esri.com/home/

http://storymaps.esri.com/downloads/Building%20Story%20Maps.pdf

My Note: Add this to Wiki

http://www.esri.com/esri-news/arcwatch/0513/make-a-map-tour-story-map?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ArcgiscomNewsFeed+%28ArcGIS.com+News+Feed%29

http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/arcgisonline/apps/download

Download the version of Esri Maps for Office that matches the bit version of Microsoft Office 2010 you have installed, not the version of your operating system (OS). If you are not sure, open Excel (or other Office application), click the File tab, and select Help. In the About Microsoft Excel section on the right, the version information states whether the Microsoft Office 2010 installation is 32-bit or 64-bit.

Once your download is complete, open Excel.

Help: http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/esri-maps-office/#/Frequently_asked_questions/029300000020000000/

My Note: I did this and its requires Arc GIS. Can one get the Shape files this way?

Map Story - temporal, social, and narrative (like Thetus Savannah)

My Note: See ESRI above. Different/Same?

Are there fundamental principles in Geographic Information Science?The book and eBook (identical contents) Are there fundamental principles in GIScience? with the contributions from the GISS-SG Tobler lecture event 2012 are now available. In addition to the chapters from Andrew Frank, Nick Chrisman, and Dan Sui, Waldo Tobler wrote a preface, Mike Goodchild wrote an afterward, and Frances Harvey prepared an introduction.

Interested readers can use a forum for the book to continue discussions or start new discussions about roles, types, and even possibilities for fundamental principles in GIScience.

Printed book: https://www.createspace.com/3932452

Ebook (for Kindle readers devices and applications): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00988BHWW

Book website: http://gisci-concepts.org

Francis Harvey is Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Minnesota. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on GIS, GIScience, information technology, and history of geography. His research ranges from algorithms for the merging of data based on proximity to studies of data sharing, collaboration, and the challenges of mapping. He is currently starting research on location privacy issues.

My Note: Ordered book: https://www.createspace.com/3932452

 

Storytelling with Maps: Workflows and Best Practices

Source: http://storymaps.esri.com/downloads/Building%20Story%20Maps.pdf (PDF)

 

Introduction

What is a story map?
 
Story maps are interactive maps combined with text and other content to tell a story about the world. Typically story maps are designed for non-technical audiences; thus, story maps include all the elements required to tell a story: web maps or map services, text, and multimedia content.
 
Story maps are at the focal point of the rapid evolution of ArcGIS from a technology available only to highly-trained specialists to an array of services and resources that can benefit everyone. Story maps bring the power of geography and spatial analysis to large audiences. They can be built not only by graphic designers and journalists, but by GIS users, web developers, and anyone with a basic familiarity with web and mobile platforms. They can serve not only the general public, but also within communities and organizations.
 
Esri publishes story maps on its at http://storymaps.esri.com every 1-2 weeks. Our goals in doing this are to:
 
• Spread the word about the power of geography and GIS,
• Demonstrate that ArcGIS is an effective communication platform, and
• Enable ArcGIS users to create their own story maps through examples, templates, and best practice documents like this one.

Anatomy of a Story map

Story maps are built on intelligent maps (also called web maps). Some typical components of intelligent maps that are commonly found in story maps are…
 
• Authoritative and well-organized data
• Clear, useful pop-ups
• Simple, purposeful cartography
• Time-enabled data
• Dynamic legends
 
In addition to the basic elements of intelligent maps, story maps also have:
 
• Descriptive text providing context, summarizing the purpose of the map, and explaining its components
• Sliders, clickable icons, or other simple interactive elements that control or enhance aspects of the map
• Multi-media content (photos, videos, etc.)
• Credit and source information
 
These elements are often enabled via story map templates, a series of which are available on http://ArcGIS.com.

The Process

Here is an overview of the process of developing and publishing a story map:
 
1. Develop a storyboard
2. Gather data
3. Create a web map or maps
a. Choose a basemap
b. Assemble the map
c. Adjust and refine the map
d. Configure pop-ups
e. Adjust symbols for point data
f. Save map
4. Share the map
5. Publish map as an app, using a story map template or other means
 
The remainder of this document presents a detailed workflow and associated best practices for designing and publishing a story map.

1. Develop a Storyboard

The first step in the process is to figure out what you are trying to say. What story do you want to communicate with your map and what is your purpose or goal in telling that story? Who is the audience? The answers to these questions should affect most other decisions you make in the process. While it is certainly possible to utilize a template to tell a good story, each story has unique answers to these basic questions, and as such each story will be unique in its content and presentation.
 
Once you decide on the story, you should think about how you can make that story as clear and simple as possible. The best story maps are usually the ones that focus on one aspect of a single subject or event of interest, rather than attempting to present a wider range of issues or subjects. Thus an effective story map often omits irrelevant subjects, categories, and details. An effective storytelling map is usually quite different than the maps that result directly from data collection or analysis. Just as a storyteller includes only the details that support his or her narrative, an effective storytelling map presents only the essentials of the story.
 
Finally, consider what elements you need to tell this story. Do you need historical data or imagery for purposes of comparison? What potential map themes will help make your point? Do you need to develop or refine a new map in ArcGIS desktop to then publish as a service? A specialist may have knowledge or background that his or her audience doesn’t have; this background information may need to be added to the story.
 
Storyboarding is usually an iterative process. Creating new maps often leads to surprises: a map may reveal a pattern you didn’t anticipate; looking for data may reveal interesting new possibilities. Refining the design and presentation of maps, popups, text, and other elements usually leads to unexpected, and sometimes undesirable, results. You’ll almost undoubtedly need to modify your concepts as you go.

2. Gather Data

The next step is to gather the datasets that you will need to tell your story. There are many potential sources for data such as:
 
• Map services and web maps on ArcGIS Online
• Downloadable data on ArcGIS Online
• Your own organization’s data or map services
• Federal, state, or local government data (e.g., data.gov, Washington, DC’s data Catalog, etc.)
• Data from third-party or commercial providers
• Self-created spreadsheets or CSVs
• Photos and other multimedia content from various sources
 
Download and assemble the data you think you will need and organize them in a folder on your computer.

3. Create a Web Map or Maps

3a. Choose a Basemap
You will need to choose an appropriate basemap. There are many basemaps available on ArcGIS Online in the ArcGIS Online Basemaps group, which are applicable to many different types of maps. Some examples are:
Topographic

BuildingStoryMapsFigure1.png

Good for general purpose use, including points, lines, and polygons
National Geographic

BuildingStoryMapsFigure2.png

Vivid and descriptive; good for point and line overlays but not ideal for polygons
Light Gray Canvas

BuildingStoryMapsFigure3.png

Ideal neutral background for many types of thematic overlays
Streets

BuildingStoryMapsFigure4.png

Useful for stories involving navigation or street addresses
Imagery

BuildingStoryMapsFigure5.png

Visually arresting and useful for showing context, but generally not good for polygon overlays
Oceans

BuildingStoryMapsFigure6.png

Ideal for ocean-related stories; also useful as a relatively neutral background map
 
Basemaps are easy to change, so after you finish your map you can always change your basemap if your original choice no longer meets your needs or doesn’t provide the best backdrop for your map.
3b. Assemble the Map
Next you’ll need to add or create one or more thematic layers. You may be able to find the maps you need by searching ArcGIS Online or the web, or you might need to create your own map layers from other data sources such as:
 
• CSV files (spreadsheets) containing location information like an address or lat/long values
Tips on adding data to your map from a CSV file can be found here My Note: What?
• Shapefiles
• KML files
• Web services of various types (e.g., ArcGIS, OGC)
 
BuildingStoryMapsFigure7.png
 
 
Government sites like http://data.gov and other state, county, or city government web sites (e.g., http://data.dc.gov) often make data available in the formats listed above. Using this information can be as simple as dragging and dropping the downloaded file onto the map (this can be done with CSV files that have X,Y coordinates in decimal degrees). If you have a SHP or KML (or a CSV with street addresses) then you can add the information in those files to your map using a simple wizard. Web services can be added to the map by providing the URL.
 
A few tips and tricks for thematic layers:
 
• To add CSV files with street addresses you’ll need to use ArcGIS Explorer Online.
• You might want to (or have to) modify a CSV before adding it to your map. Organize fields with pop-ups in mind, including text descriptions, info and  image URLs, graphics, rankings, etc.
• To upload a shapefile, compress and combine all of the component files into a .ZIP file.
 
BuildingStoryMapsFigure8.png
 
The http://ArcGIS.com help system has more information on creating web maps and adding data to web maps, including several videos.
 
You can also enable others to participate in your story map by adding an editable layer. Editable layers can be used to enable others to add their own information by clicking on the map and filling out a simple form. An example of this type of participatory map is the “A Place Where…” story map.
3c. Adjust and Refine the Map
Once the content of the map has been assembled, it is time to refine the look of the map. You can adjust the order in which the map layers are displayed, and you can add and delete layers. The layer list shows the order in which they draw; the layer on the top of the list is on top and the last layer (the basemap) will be drawn on the bottom. You can adjust the transparency of each layer, which enables users see through that layer to the layers underneath.
 
BuildingStoryMapsFigure9.png
Adjust cartography
Here are a few tips on cartography for storytelling:
 
• In general, point layers should be at the top of the list, followed by layers with linear data and then polygon data. (The basemap is always at the bottom of the list.)
• Use dark or bold colors for point data to make it stand out.
• Use subdued or pastel colors for polygon layers. If the polygon layers are the focus of the map, darker colors can be used. Also, polygon layers typically should have transparency set between 50-75% so that the basemap is visible for context.
• If the basemap obscures or competes with your thematic content, try a basemap with a simpler color palette and less detail, like the gray canvas basemap or ocean basemap. If your storyrequires the detail of a basemap like the world topographic or world imagery basemap, try setting the transparency of the basemap layer to about 50%.
3d. Configure Pop-Ups
The next step in refining the look of the map is to configure pop-ups on one or more layers of the map. A pop-up is a box that appears with more information when you click on a symbol or certain parts of the map. Each layer in a map might have a pop-up configured with details about the data. In the example above, the pop-up contains the date and type of crime as well as the district in which the crime took place; however, the CSV file that was used to create that layer had many more pieces of information. Most of this information was hidden to provide just what is useful for users of the map.
 
BuildingStoryMapsFigure10.png
 
Often pop-ups contain a table of information, but there are other format options as well. A free-form paragraph can be written to populate the pop-up window. 
 
Information about the specific layer item can be added to the paragraph using field codes. The data from the CSV file from the appropriate field is substituted for the field code in the finished pop-up.
 
The popup title can also be refined, and can include a combination of text and data from the CSV. For instance, a county popup on a state or U.S. map might say, “The population of Hamilton County is 143,000,” with “Hamilton County” coming from a county name field, and “143,000” coming from a population field.
 
If the CSV contains tabular data in related fields, such as population change over time, or proportions within a category, the data can be visualized as one or more graphs. You can specify the type of graph, including bar and column charts, line graphs, and pie charts.
 
Your popups can also include photographs, provided you use photos that are publicly accessible on the web. You can add popups and photographs individually by opting to “Create Editable Layer” on ArcGIS.com, and copying the photo’s URL into the appropriate box in the popup editing tool. The best way to add multiple photos, however, is to include a photo column in your CSV. There you can add the URLs of many photos (preferably one photo for each popup); that way, you can create multiple popups that combine title, text, photo, and perhaps graphs (although too many elements make for cumbersome popups).
 
Tips:
• Avoid repeating information in your pop-up. For example, a field should not appear both in the pop-up title and the list of attributes.
• Spend some time refining the names of your labels. Maps derived from GIS data or CSVs often need to be reworded or shortened, and to have items, such as underscores between words, removed.
• Make your popups informative but as brief as possible.
• You can use HTML coding to further refine your popups, including customizing text fonts.
 
The ArcGIS.com help system has more information on configuring pop-up windows.
3e. Adjust symbols for point data
Tip: When you click “Change Symbol” you’ll see a number of “Basic” options. There are several symbol libraries in addition to “Basic;” the “Shapes” library contains symbols that are graphically strong and are appropriate for a wide variety of uses. In most cases, you should avoid symbols that are visually complex.
 
BuildingStoryMapsFigure11.png
3f. Save the map
To save maps, you’ll need an ArcGIS Online account. If you do not have one yet, you can learn how to create one here.
 
Once you have an account, you’ll be able to save your maps and other content items. Initially when you save your map, you’ll be given a short form to enter items such as a title, summary, and keywords. You can complete this step fairly quickly with just some simple placeholder information, since it is recommended that after saving your map you spend some time refining “About” and editing the map title, summary, description, keywords, and other item information. Here are some tips for documenting your map:
 
• If you plan to publish many maps, give some thought to naming conventions for your map titles.
• Create a good thumbnail using a program like SnagIt. Many screenshot programs allow you to create templates for easily grabbing thumbnails of a specific size. More information about creating good thumbnails can be found in this ArcGIS.com help topic and this blog post.
• You should be thoughtful and thorough about the tags you add when you save your map. These tags will make your map more easily found by other users when they do searches.
• Avoid cluttering map summaries with phrases like, “This map shows…” or “This is a map of….” Keep summaries short and useful.
• Utilize photos, graphics, and text formatting to make your description compelling and easy to read.
• Avoid long URLs in your description by embedding them in your text.
• Good example: “Source data can be downloaded from the USDA.”
• Bad example: “Source data can be downloaded here: http://explore.data.gov/Health-and-Nutrition/USDA-National-Nutrient-Database-for-Standard-Refer/6wh6-wbgc.”
• Be sure to include source credits for data, cartography, research, or other information used to create your map.

4. Share the Web Map

ArcGIS Online provides many different sharing options for web maps; however, if you are publishing a story map you’ll want to share your web map publicly (i.e., chose the “Share with everyone (public)” option) so anyone can see it. However, sharing with everyone may not be the best option if your story is intended for a limited audience.
 
BuildingStoryMapsFigure12.png
 
A powerful function of ArcGIS Online is the ability to create, manage, and join groups. Hundreds of groups range from small, private circles of users sharing a special interest, to large, public groups with scores of members. You can organize your own groups, and you can request invitations to existing ones. You can opt to share your map to any of the groups that you belong to. But be sure to share to groups only for which your map will be of interest. (You can also share your completed story to the public and/or to groups within ArcGIS Online. See below.)

5. Publish the Story Map

Once your web map has been created and shared, it is ready to be combined with the rest of the story. There are a few ways to do this:
 
• Embed the web map or presentation into a website
• Publish as a simple app using a template
• Publish as a custom web app
Embed the map or presentation
The simplest way to publish a map is to embed it directly in a press release, blog post, or other web page. This is as easy as copying-and-pasting the provided HTML code into a web page that contains text and other content that tells your story. The embedded map is interactive; that is, viewers can zoom and pan the map and click on it to see the pop-ups. Maps with presentations can also be embedded. Details of how to embed a web map can be found in the ArcGIS.com help topic on sharing web maps.
Use an app template
There are also many templates available (and more being developed) that combine a web map with a simple user experience to create a stand-alone web application. A self-service option for publishing a web map is to use one of the app templates available on ArcGIS.com. This can be done without any development work, and the apps are hosted in Esri’s cloud so you don’t need your own web server to deploy these apps. The “Storytelling with Maps” group on ArcGIS.com contains templates that are developed specifically to enable story maps.
 
Examples of templates are shown below and include a basic viewer with a few tools like a basemap switcher and measure tool, one that shows three maps side-by-side, and one that enables overlay of social content from Twitter. Templates are also available to swipe between layers or to control how the map displays historical data.
BuildingStoryMapsFigure13.png
 
Other templates are available on ArcGIS.com that can be downloaded, configured or customized, and then deployed on your own web server. Examples of this type of template include PollMap and the Election Results Viewer.
Typically, app templates will use information stored with your web map (such as the title, summary, and description), so spending time on those items will improve your web application.
 
If you revise or edit any of a web map’s properties, they will automatically be updated in any web apps that use that map. This enables story map publishers to easily update their maps, keeping the stories fresh and current.
 
Keep an eye on http://ArcGIS.com, and on http://storymaps.esri.com, for new story map templates. Three fully configurable story templates will be available on http://ArcGIS.com in early February 2012. More story templates will be made available later in 2012.
Develop a custom app
If your story is a bit more sophisticated you can work with a web developer to design and build a custom web application for your map. With a custom application you’ll have much more control over the look and feel of the pop-ups and other app components, and the developer will have all the power of the ArcGIS Web APIs at their disposal to create a very compelling app.
 
You can see many examples of story maps using custom web apps on Esri’s Storytelling with Maps website.

Conclusion

Story maps are a new medium. Working in a new medium has its challenges—tools and techniques are rapidly evolving—but it can have significant rewards. Story maps represent a new capability of GIS, expanding its traditional use for planning, analysis, and decision support and making its products accessible to much broader audiences. Geography-based storytelling can provide new insights, including a greater appreciation of causes and context, and an deeper understanding of interrelationships and effects. Well-told story maps will educate, inform, and inspire your colleagues, customers, and constituents.

 

Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

Source: http://ucgis2.org/event-group/ucgis-2013-symposium

From the exposome to the biome, individuals, organizations and government agencies are collecting increasingly vast amounts of geographic information. The spatial, temporal and attribute granularity of such data are increasing every day, yet the communities, systems and infrastructures to support these data are often ad hoc and ephemeral. Without concerted attention to preserving the provenance, accessibility and community connections of these wide ranging data and systems, their true value may never be fully realized.

Join the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science for a three-day symposium addressing issues of big data to little data, global to local spatial data infrastructures and systems architectures, and the potential roles for partnerships spanning academia, industry, government and professional societies. Join us in creating communities that lay the foundation for fostering sustainable knowledge production from ever-increasing data streams in the ever-widening disciplines of GIScience.

Come prepared to participate! 

Leave with new ideas, new partnerships and new collaborations.

Source:http://ucgis2.org/event-item/preliminary-program

Preliminary Program

George Mason University
The Mason Inn and Conference Center
Washington, D.C.

Pre-Symposium Workshops: May 20, 2013
Symposium Dates: May 21-23, 2013

Monday, May 20, 2013 - Pre-symposium Day

Workshops will begin at 8:00 AM, Workshop Registration/Check-in will begin at 7:30AM.

Full Day Workshop

Full Day Workshop 1: Enabling Real-Time GIS with ArcGIS GeoEvent Processor for Server
Workshop Leaders: Adam Mollenkopf, Hanoch Kalmanovich (Esri)

This workshop will provide meeting participants insight and experience in using ArcGIS server for real-time event data. The proposers indicate that participants will leave with an understanding how real-time streaming data can be exploited within ArcGIS and some of the basic requirements for implementing a real-time GIS and continuous processing environment.

Full Day Workshop 2: CANCELED - Crowdsourcing Geospatial Data

Volunteered geographic information (VGI), crowdsourcing, neogeography, participatory remote sensing, produsage—what’s the difference, and what are the implications for GIScience? This workshop features discussions and hands-on demonstrations from researchers and practitioners.  Workshop participants will gain a better understanding of these new technologies, knowledge of the disruptive changes they pose to GIScience, and suggestions for their use in the GIS curriculum.

We apologies to attendees that this workshop is canceled. Several of the workshop leaders are unable to participate due to travel restrictions. We will do our best to reschedule it for next year. If you were planning on attending this workshop and have already paid your registration fee, we will be in contact soon to either transfer your registration to another workshop or to refund the fee. 

Consecutive Tech Track Workshops

Half Day Workshop – Tech Track 1: Spatial SQL: A Language for Geographers 
Workshop Leader: Arthur Lembo (Salisbury University)

This workshop will teach participants the extraordinary power and simplicity of writing SQL queries to solve GIS based tasks by adding spatial constructs to an already robust suite of SQL commands.   A single spatial SQL query can often accomplish more than 100 lines of computer code.  You will learn how to use spatial SQL to model classic GIS tasks like adjacency, containment, and connectivity, and also tackle more sophisticated problems in spatial statistics.  

This will be a hands-on workshop where the students will work alongside the instructor to actually write spatial SQL queries using a real world data set.  Attendees should bring their laptop so they can install a minimalistic GIS tool that uses spatial SQL.  At the end of the workshop, attendees will appreciate this easy to use and underutilized toolset at their disposal, and recognize how simple it is to leverage the power of SQL for GIS tasks.  

Half Day Workshop - Tech Track 2: A Crash-Course in Spatial Analyses Using Program R
Workshop Leader: Shannon Albeke (University of Wyoming)

The workshop is implemented in two segments. The first segment will introduce participants to Program R (http://www.r-project.org/) and the Integrated Development Environment (IDE) of R Studio (http://www.rstudio.com). We will begin by covering basic data management, summaries and visualization. After getting a ‘feel’ for R and the R Studio interface, we will move onto introducing concepts and methods for performing several types of spatial analyses including raster/vector manipulation and integration, point-pattern analysis, geostatistics, kernel density estimates, spatial autocorrelation and regression. The examples will be introduced relatively quickly and are meant to provide you with an overview of how to perform these same analyses on your own data.

Consecutive Collaboration Workshops

Half Day Workshop – Collaboration Track 1: Sustainability Learning Communities Network: Opportunities for Sustainability Research, Education, and Outreach Coordination
Workshop Leader: Tim Nyerges (University of Washington)

Learning communities have synergized group-based learning for myriad topics, and shown to be engaging and productive learning environments. Cyber-enabled learning communities have been and are expected to grow.  University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) is fostering a Sustainability Learning Communities Network (SLCN) based upon efforts by several UCGIS member delegates over the past few years. The SLCN is intended to build local, state, regional, and national learning capacity among researchers, educators, students, practitioners, policymakers, and members of the public by providing them with easy-to-use knowledge sharing web resources consisting of geospatial-enabled knowledge management content, tools and methods to support development of livable and sustainable communities. Although funding will be sought for this activity, at the current time many UCGIS member delegates seek to build synergy among its member institutions based upon current research, education and outreach efforts about sustainability science, sustainability information science, and sustainability management.  This workshop takes next steps to facilitate networking activity among three sub-networks - research coordination, education coordination and outreach coordination (SRC, SEC, and SOC, respectively) - supported by SLCN platforms. 

Half Day Workshop – Collaboration Track 2: Mapping Potential Futures for the GIS&T BoK 2.0
Workshop Leader: John Wilson (University of Southern California)

The GIS&T Body of Knowledge is one of the premier products to come out of UCGIS-coordinated community activities. It has served as a critical foundation for development of multiple accreditation and certification programs, the US Department of Labor Geospatial Technology Competency Model, as the core of a successful NSF research effort, and as the central theme in numerous peer-reviewed publications. This workshop will be used to help map potential futures for the GIS&T Body of Knowledge and to help identify parties interested in contributing to those futures.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Inter-organizational Ties for Strengthening Collaborations

8:15 – 8:30
AM

Welcoming Remarks

Dr. Peggy Agouris
Chair, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science
George Mason University

8:30 – 9:00
AM
 

Presidential Keynote

UCGIS’ Role in Educating the Next Generation of GIScientists

Laxmi Ramasubramanian
Associate Professor of Urban Planning and Design
Dept. of Urban Affairs and Planning, Hunter College
President, UCGIS

9:00 – 10:00
AM

Welcoming Plenary Theme

Why we need to emphasize collaboration across communities: Challenges and Opportunities for GIScience

Mark E. Reichardt, President and CEO
Open Geospatial Consortium

10:00 – 10:20
AM

Break

Sponsored by: Boundary Solutions

Boundary Solutions, Inc.

10:20 – 11:50
AM

Plenary Panel

NSDI 2.0 Panel: A dialogue among federal, state and academic representatives on the future of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure

Moderator:
Jeff Hamerlinck, University of Wyoming
Chair, UCGIS Policy & Legislation Committee

Panelists:
Ivan DeLoatch, Executive Director, Federal Geographic Data Committee (representing FGDC)
Jerry Johnston, Geospatial Information Officer, US Department of the Interior (representing NGAC)
Carolyn Merry, Professor, Civil, Environmental & Geodetic Engineering, Ohio State University (representing UCGIS)
Kenny Miller, Geospatial Information Officer, State of Maryland and President Elect, National States Geographic Information Council (representing NSGIC)

12:00 – 1:30
PM

Working Lunch and Council Meeting Briefings

Sponsored by: GE Digital Energy
GE Digital Energy Monogram

1:30 – 2:10
PM

Plenary Talk

Collaboration Across Communities: A Futurology of GIScience

Ola Ahlqvist
Associate Professor
Department of Geography,
Director Service-Learning Initiative
Associate Director, CETI
The Ohio State University

2:10 – 2:50
PM

Research Award Winner Plenary

Towards a Semantically Enabled Spatial Analytical Workbench (SESAW)

Luc Anselin
School of Geographical Sciences
Arizona State University

2:50 – 3:10
PM

Break

Sponsored by: Boundary Solutions

Boundary Solutions, Inc.

3:10 – 4:30
PM

Report to the Community

An open forum for any and all participants to share current work, new developments in the community, updates on previous UCGIS initiatives, announcements of opportunities, and any item of potential interest to the broader UCGIS community. Specifically included will be an update on Geospatial Extension and any other relevant/related work.

IGU Update - Francis Harvey
USpatial Update - Francis Harvey
BoK Update – John Wilson, Laxmi Ramasubramanian
SLCN Update – Tim Nyerges
GISCI Update – Jeremy Mennis, James Wilson

Other Initiatives

4:30-5:30PM
 

Committee Meetings

Membership, Policy and Legislation, and Communication

5:30 – 7:00
PM

Opening Reception

Awarding of UCGIS Fellows:

Roger Tomlinson

Barbara Buttenfield

Robert McMaster

Sponsored by: Dean of the College of Science, George Mason University
George Mason University

Press Release

Source: http://ucgis2.org/sites/default/files/press-release-files/UCGIS2013FellowsPressRelease.pdf

 
Three Eminent Geographers will be honored as UCGIS Fellows in 2013
For Immediate Release
 
The University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) will honor three individuals who have contributed to the advancement of geographic information science education and research at its upcoming annual Symposium to be held on the campus of George Mason University, May 21st to 23rd, 2013. UCGIS will honor Dr. Barbara Buttenfield (University of Colorado-Boulder), Dr. Robert McMaster (University of Minnesota), both eminent educators and leaders in the fields of geography and GIScience and Dr. Roger Tomlinson (Tomlinson Associates Consulting, Ottawa, Canada), a visionary geographer who conceived and developed GIS for use by the Canada Land Inventory in the 1960s. Additional information about the symposium program can be found at: http://ucgis2.org/event-group/ucgis-2013-symposium
 
The Fellows Program http://ucgis2.org/fellows was created in 2010 to celebrate the extraordinary record of achievements of individuals in a variety of spatial disciplines and communities of practice that use spatial information. The new Fellows were selected by the UCGIS Board from a slate of nominees presented by the current UCGIS Fellows.
 
Dr. David Mark (University at Buffalo, the State University of New York), a 2010 UCGIS Fellow and a former UCGIS President, chaired the 2013 UCGIS Fellows Committee, and made the following statement: “The 15 current Fellows reviewed dossiers for 10 outstanding GIScience contributors, and made recommendations to the UCGIS Board. We are pleased to welcome three new Fellows, Babs Buttenfield, Bob McMaster, and Roger Tomlinson, into the community of Fellows of the UCGIS.”
 
In additional to convening an annual symposium, UCGIS sponsors workshops, curriculum-related projects and other special initiatives designed to benefit the community as a whole, and that are beyond the scope of activities that can be undertaken at a single university. UCGIS is a hub for the GIS research and education community and serves as a national voice to advocate for its members’ interests.
 
About UCGIS: The University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) is a non-profit scientific and educational organization comprised of over 65 member and affiliate institutions established in 1995 for the purpose of advancing research in the field of Geographic Information Science, expanding and strengthening multidisciplinary Geographic Information Science education, advocating policies for the promotion of the ethical use of and access to geographic information and technologies, by building and supporting scholarly communities and networks.
 
For further information, visit www.ucgis2.org or contact Jack Sanders, Executive Director (execdir@ucgis.org)
###
Roger Tomlinson

Source: http://ucgis2.org/ucgis-fellow/roger-tomlinson

Dr. Roger Tomlinson is generally recognized as the "father of GIS.” He is the visionary geographer who conceived and developed the first GIS for use by the Canada Land Inventory in the early 1960s.  This and continuing contributions led the Canadian government to give him its highest civilian award, the Order of Canada, in 2001.  Text for that award reads, “he pioneered its uses worldwide to collect, manage, and manipulate geographical data, changing the face of geography as a discipline.”
 
Tomlinson tells the story of how this came to be.  In the early 1960s he was working as a photo interpreter for Spartan Air Services in Canada.  They had a contract to identify the best location for a tree plantation in Kenya.  They turned to their young geographer Tomlinson and asked him to develop a methodology.  He tried various manual methods for overlaying various environmental, cultural, and economic variables, but all were too costly.  He turned to computers and found the solution.  Subsequently he sold this approach to the Canada Land Inventory that had the responsibility of using data to assist the government in its land use planning activities.  His GIS approach reduced the task from three years and eight million Canadian dollars to several weeks and two million dollars.
 
He has gone on to serve the community in many ways.  He chaired the International Geographical Union’s GIS Commission for 12 years, where he pioneered the concepts of worldwide geographical data availability. He is a past president of the Canadian Association of Geographers a recipient of its rare Canadian Award for Service to the Profession. 
 
Other awards followed including the James R. Anderson Medal of Honor for Applied Geography (1995) and the Robert T. Aangeenbrug Distinguished Career Award (2005) from the American Association of Geographers.  He was the first recipient of the Aangeenbrug award and also the first recipient of ESRI’s Lifetime Achievement Award (1997). National Geographic gave him its rare Alexander Graham Bell Award for exceptional contributions to geographic research (2010). He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and the recipient of multiple honorary doctorates – in addition to his own PhD from University College London.
 
Since 1977 he has operated Tomlinson Associates, Ltd., Consulting Geographer which has advised clients like the World Bank, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the U.S. departments of Commerce and Agriculture, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Bureau of the Census, the Canadian Forest Service, and numerous U.S. state and Canadian provincial and municipal government agencies.  The Order of Canada award documents the impact of that work. “Governments and scientists around the world have turned to him to better understand our environment and changing patterns of land use, to better manage urban development and our precious natural resources.” 
 
His book, Thinking About GIS: Geographic  Information System Planning for Managers, provides guidance for both senior managers responsible for a broad range of activities in their organization and the more technical managers responsible for actual implementation of GIS.   The 4th edition of this popular book was published in 2011.

Awarded Year: 
2013
Barbara Buttenfield

Source: http://ucgis2.org/ucgis-fellow/barbara-buttenfield

Dr. Barbara P. Buttenfield (babs), Professor, Department of Geography, University of Colorado-Boulder and Director, Meridian Research Laboratory, has made many important and seminal contributions to research and education in Geographic Information Science (GIScience) and to UCGIS. Her most important contributions are in the area of map generalization and multiple representations, a term first used at a National Science Foundation-funded specialist meeting she organized in 1989. Her papers from the 1980s on the structure and scaling properties of cartographic lines, were truly seminal and helped others to develop procedures for automated segmentation and structure recognition in line data, as well as automated parameter setting of generalization algorithms. Perhaps equally influential within the GIScience research community was her role as a facilitator of the birth and development of the map generalization community. The multiple representations workshop and a second workshop she organized with Bob McMaster on automated map generalization that yielded a landmark 1991 book on this topic, helped to lay a foundation that led to the formation of the Commission on Generalization of the International Cartographic Association. Her work has been highly cited and her influence on other researchers is testimonial.
 
Another example of Dr. Buttenfield’s impact on the evolution of GIScience is her influence on the development of spatialization as a core technique of modern geovisualization. She had already experimented with multi-dimensional scaling in the 1980s and later inspird her students to explore spatializations leading to research on spatialization of non spatial data, such as news archives and digital library catalogs. Additional great contributions and services to the GIScience community in the United States and worldwide from Dr. Buttenfield include her work on the visualization of data quality, where she co-initiated the first long-term research initiative on this topic in the 1990s, her work on geographic information design, map animation, and on user evaluation of map designs and user interfaces.
 
Dr. Buttenfield has deep links within government communities that handle geospatial data, working at the Defense Mapping Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey and maintaining these relationships of guidance and inspiration for 30 years. She led the American Cartography Association in the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping (ACSM) as it shifted from cartography to geographic information systems (GIS) to GIScience, fielding member surveys, a strategic planning exercise, and negotiating ACSM buy-in on progress toward a scientific stance and integration of cartography with GIS. She has been a regular participant in National Science Foundation proposal review committees and National Research Council (NRC) committees, including multiple terms on the NRC Mapping Science Committee.
 
Dr. Buttenfield has also made exemplary contributions to GIScience education and was awarded the inaugural UCGIS Education Award in 2001. She has advised outstanding graduate students who are now professors and expanding the domains of research and education she pioneered. Many academics only have one significant advisee that carries their ethos to the next generation of academics; Dr. Buttenfield has many.
 
Dr. Buttenfield received a BA from Clark University, an MA from the University of Kansas, and her Ph.D. from the University of Washington, all in geography.  She has held academic positions at University of California – Santa Barbara, University of Wisconsin-Madison, State University of New York at Buffalo, and her current position at University of Colorado. She has received awards for her work in research, best paper awards, and is a lifetime Fellow of the ACSM. She served UCGIS as a delegate and in its early years developed the strategic plan that led the organization.
 
For her outstanding contributions to GIScience research and education and to UCGIS, Dr. Barbara P. Buttenfield is awarded the status of UCGIS Fellow, 2013.

Awarded Year: 
2013
Robert McMaster

Source: http://ucgis2.org/ucgis-fellow/robert-mcmaster

Dr. Robert B. McMaster, Professor of Geography, Vice Provost, and Dean of Undergraduate Education at the University of Minnesota, is a scholar of international reputation who has made extraordinary contributions to research, education, and service in geographic information science (GIScience) and technology (GIS&T) and to UCGIS. Dr. McMaster has made significant research contributions in automated generalization of geospatial data and phenomena, environmental risk, GIScience and society and the history of U.S. academic cartography. Among the outstanding scholarly contributions for the broader community are his completion of a five-year NSF funded project to develop the “National Historical Geographic Information System,” data from which have been used in countless educational situations. He has published several books including: Map Generalization: Making Rules for Knowledge Representation(with B. Buttenfield), Generalization in Digital Cartography (with K. Stuart Shea), Thematic Cartography and Geographic Visualization (with T. Slocum, F. Kessler and H. Howard), and A Research Agenda for Geographic Information Science (with E. L. Usery). He is an associate editor of the Manual of Geospatial Technology with John Bossler, Chris Rizos, and James Campbell. He is also co-editor of the Handbook of GIScience and Society Research with Timothy Nyerges and Helen Couclelis.
 
Dr. McMaster has a sustained record of contributions to GIScience education teaching classes for over 30 years  including courses in cartography, computer and digital cartography, geographic information systems, geographical statistics, introduction to maps and mapping, remote sensing, quantitative methods in geography, urban GIS and analysis, research methods in geography, GIS and medical geography, and others. He has supervised both masters and Ph.D. students in cartography and GIScience and continues to be actively engaged with student instruction and supervision. His students have secured positions in the academy as well as government and private industry. He received the 2010 UCGIS Education Award providing evidence of his outstanding contributions. In addition to teaching and advising, Professor McMaster currently serves as Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Education at the University of Minnesota. He has long worked to advance GIS education through research, teaching, policy development, and service to the GIScience community. Dr. McMaster is also a co-author of Thematic Cartography and Geographic Visualization with Terry Slocum, Fritz Kessler, and Hugh Howard, that is widely used and becoming a standard in cartography classes in the English-speaking world.
 
Dr. McMaster served as editor of the journal Cartography and Geographic Information Systems from 1990-1996, and the Association of American Geographers (AAG), Resource Publications in Geography. He served as Chair of both the AAG’s Cartography and Geographic Information Systems Specialty Groups, served three years on the National Steering Committee for the GIS/LIS ‘92, ‘93, and ‘94 conferences, was Co-Director (with Marc Armstrong) of the Eleventh International Symposium on Computer-Assisted Cartography (Auto-Carto-11), served on the U.S. National Committee to the International Cartographic Association, and as a member of the Advisory Board for the Center for Mapping at Ohio State University. In 1999, he was elected as a Vice President of the International Cartographic Association, and was re-elected in 2003. He served as President of the United States’ Cartography and Geographic Information Society and was appointed to a three-year term on the National Research Council’s Mapping Sciences Committee 2005-2008. Dr. McMaster has been a long-time contributor of service to UCGIS. He has been Chair of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science’s (UCGIS) Research Committee, UCGIS Board Member (1999-2002, 2005-2006), President of UCGIS (2007-2008), and past President (2008-2009). He currently serves as treasurer to the organization. He currently is in his second term on the National Research Council’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR).
 
For his exemplary contributions to research, education, and service to GIScience and to UCGIS, Dr. Robert B. McMaster is awarded the status of UCGIS Fellow, 2013.

Awarded Year: 
2013

 

Wednesday, May 22

Data Communities

8:15 – 8:30
AM

Welcoming Remarks

Tim Nyerges
University of Washington

 

8:30 – 9:15
AM

Plenary Theme

An Emerging Community - EarthCube

Barbara Ransom
Program Director, NSF GEO/OCE

Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign

9:15 – 10:00
AM

Plenary Theme

Evolutionary creation of data communities and their infrastructure:

How we got to where we presently are and where we might be going.

Tim Foresman
President, International Centre for Remote Sensing Education

10:00 – 10:20
AM
 

Break

Sponsored by: Boundary Solutions

10:20 – 11:50
AM

Plenary Panel

Data Communities: Hierarchies and Flatness in a World of Abundant Data

Barbara Ransom, EarthCube, NSF
Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, EarthCube
Tim Foresman, Digital Earth and Remote Sensing
Stephen Berrick, NASA ESDS
Stephen Lowe, USDA GIO 
Mike Jackson, President AGILE

12:00 – 1:30
PM

Working Lunch/Second Council Meeting

1:40 – 2:10
PM
 

Plenary Talk

A Data Community in Practice

Wendy Guan
Harvard WorldMap

2:10 – 3:40
PM

Panel Session

Industry and Public-Private Partnerships for GIScience 2.0

Dave DiBiase, ESRI 
Stefan Falke, Northrop Grumman
Chris Tucker/Liz Lyon, MapStory
Doug Nebert, FGDC
Anne Hale Miglarese, President & CEO, PlanetiQ

3:40 – 4:00
PM

Break

Sponsored by: Boundary Solutions

4:00 – 5:30
PM

Student Research Papers

A single-track research session with papers presented by the student travel award winners.

Mining Trajectory Data and Geotagged Data in Social Media for Road Map Inference
Jun Li, Qiming Qin, Jiawei Han, Lu-An Tang and Kin Hou Lei

Community-engaged GIS for Urban Food Justice Research
Margaret Pettygrove and Rina Ghose

Open Data: a catalyst for urban innovation
Aaron Fraint

How geography influences the formation of social ties: A case study of gang rivalry relationship in Los Angeles
Tong Sun, Ling Bian and Steven Radil

Thursday, May 23

Pushing the Frontier

8:15 – 8:30
AM

Welcoming Remarks

Steve Prager
UCGIS President Elect
Department of Geography
University of Wyoming

8:30 – 9:30
AM
 

Presentation of Education Award

Education Plenary Theme

GIScience Education in an age of high performance computing, cloud computing and web GIS

Ken Foote, UCGIS Education Award Winner
Department of Geography
University of Colorado

Q&A

9:30 – 10:00
AM
 

Curriculum Standards Development

Ann Johnson
GeoTech Center

10:00 – 10:15
AM

Break

Sponsored by: Esri and CRC Press
esri  CRC Press

10:15 – 10:45
AM

GIS&T Knowledge Ecosystem

André Skupin
BoK2 Research Group
San Diego State University

10:45 – 11:30
AM
 

Education Committee Meeting

Sarah Battersby
Education Committee, Vice Chair

11:40 – 1:30
PM

Working Lunch, includes Research Committee Meeting

Sponsored by: USGIF
United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation

1:40 – 2:10
PM

Research Plenary Talk

GIScience Research and Development in an age of HPC, cloud computing and Web GIS

Phil Yang
Department of Geography and GeoInformation Sciences
George Mason University

Doug Nebert
Federal Geographic Data Committee

2:10 – 3:40
PM
 

Presented Papers: General Research

Research papers will be present in three concurrent sessions. Rooms to be announced at the Symposium.

Morteza Karimzadeh
Participatory Crisis Management: GeoCollaboration at Three Levels

Peter Sforza, Charles Staton, Kyle Schutt and Thomas Dickerson
Linking Location Based Social Networks and Internet-based Video Cameras

Stephen Hirtle
The Wisdom of the Crowds versus the Ignorance of the Crowds

Wei Huang and Chengbin Deng
A geographic approach to carbon accounting of Wisconsin

Xingong Li and Weibo Liu
Event Identification, Representation, and Exploration in Hydrometeorological Spatiotemporal Data

Ola Ahlqvist and Dalia Varanka
Semantic issues in Land-Cover Analysis – Representation, Analysis and Visualization

James Wilson, Ralph Grove, Dave Kolas, Nancy Wiegand, Gary Berg-Cross and Mike Dean
Building a Visual GeoSPARQL Query Tool For General Use

Chuanrong Zhang, Tian Zhao and Weidong Li
A Parallel approach to improve query performance of Web Feature Services (WFS) for disaster management and response

 

3:40 – 4:00
PM

Closing Remarks

Steve Prager
UCGIS President Elect
Department of Geography
University of Wyoming

Thursday Evening Program

Complementary Coach to USGIF Meeting/Reception

Sponsored byUSGIF
United States Geospatial Intelligence Foundation

Call for Papers

Deadline Extended: March 15, 2013
Application Deadline: February 14, 2013

UCGIS 2013 Symposium

May 21-23, Washington DC

In conjunction with
STUDENT & JUNIOR FACULTY TRAVEL AWARDS
Sponsored by: Esri


Overview:

The University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) is a non‑profit organization of over seventy universities and other research institutions dedicated to expanding and strengthening Geographic Information Science and Technologies (GIS&T).

UCGIS enthusiastically announces a Call for Papers about:

Collaboration Across Communities:
GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

The outstanding three-day Symposium will address issues of big data to little data, global to local spatial data infrastructures and systems architectures, and the potential roles for partnerships spanning academia, industry, government and professional societies.  The program will involve plenary sessions, panel discussions, outcome-oriented workshops, and presentations from students, junior faculty and established scholars.

Full papers of up to 5000 words or abstracts of up to 500 words addressing the above themes are solicited for two tracks: one for current students and the other for junior faculty and established scholars. Full papers from junior faculty and student authors from UCGIS member institutions may be eligible to receive reimbursement for travel expenses up to $750 for junior faculty, and $500 for students. Full papers from students will be eligible for a best paper award and all full papers will be considered for inclusion in a special journal issue.

The deadline for submission of materials is 12:00 midnight EST, February 14, 2013.  Please submit your materials through our EasyChair conference management site:https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ucgis2013. If you do not already have an EasyChair account you will need to create one prior to submitting your abstract or paper. No more than one student and/or one junior faculty member will be selected from any UCGIS institution to receive a travel award to attend the meeting. If you have received a UCGIS student paper award in the past, you are still eligible to submit again, but the paper must be on a completely new research topic. Only students and junior faculty of UCGIS member institutions in good standing are eligible to be considered for the awards. A faculty member at a UCGIS member institution must approve student papers. Papers will be posted to the UCGIS website (http://www.ucgis.org/) for review by all members in advance of the start of the UCGIS Symposium. Notification of acceptance will be made on or before March 20, 2013.


UCGIS Travel Award:

For students and junior scholars from UCGIS member institutions in good standing and with papers selected for presentation, a limited number of competitive awards may be available for up to $500 for students, and $750 for junior faculty to help cover travel costs for the 2013 Symposium.  Individuals will be responsible for making their own travel and accommodation arrangements and submitting receipts for reimbursement following the meeting. If needed, participants are encouraged to apply for additional funds from their home institutions. In order to receive the award, the participants from member institutions must provide a written paper for the UCGIS electronic proceedings and present the paper at the 2013 Symposium. To encourage continued participation with UCGIS, recipients of the travel awards may be invited to referee future UCGIS student and junior faculty papers.


Publication Awards:

Presented papers will be reviewed for consideration for submission to one of two peer-reviewed outlets. The editors of Transactions in GIS and Cartographica have agreed to receive and evaluate manuscripts selected by UCGIS to appear as special issues in those journals. In addition, Transactions in GIS will present a “Best Paper” award for the best student paper.   Papers to be considered for Transactions in GIS and Cartographica should be on topics relevant to those journals and to the overarching theme of the Symposium.

To be eligible for publication, papers must not have been previously published nor should they be under consideration for publication.  Student authors must also be either engaged in full or part-time postgraduate education and research or within one year of completion of their research degree (assuming the scholar does not have faculty appointment). The editors will approve the selection of all papers that are to be considered for publication.

Call for Education Award Nominations

Source: http://ucgis2.org/event-item/call-education-award-nominations

Nomination deadline: February 1, 2013

The UCGIS Education Committee invites nominations for the 2013 UCGIS Education Award. The award is presented annually to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to GIScience education. The award is intended to recognize a career of professional contributions of both national and international significance to GIScience education. Such contributions may be reflected in (but not limited to):

  • Effective teaching of formal GIScience courses
  • Enhancing public awareness of GIScience
  • Mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students who enter careers in GIScience related professions
  • Authorship of significant GIScience textbooks
  • Publication of significant research concerned with GIScience education
  • Leadership in developing GIScience education across the campus
  • Leadership in GIScience curriculum development
  • Leadership in the development of GIScience education policy

All GIScience educators worldwide are eligible for the award, except for previous awardees and current members of the Education Award Subcommittee. However, only affiliates of UCGIS member institutions may make official nominations.  To nominate an educator for the award, submit the following to the Brandon Plewe, the UCGIS Education Committee Chair, at plewe@byu.edu by February 1, 2013:

  • A nominating letter (e-mail is acceptable), containing basic contact and affiliation information for the nominee, and a brief summary of the nominee's contributions to GIScience education (1 page or less)
  • A document describing and justifying the specific contributions of the nominee, as suggested above; a complete vita is not necessary, but please provide citations for published works (2-3 pages)

Nominations will be reviewed by a subcommittee of the Education Committee. The Education Award Subcommittee may identify additional nominees, or may recommend that no award be given in a particular year. The UCGIS Board of Directors will give final approval of the award recipient. The award will be presented at the UCGIS Spring Symposium in May 2013, in Washington, DC.

For your information, here are the past award recipients:

2012 – Bill Huxhold

2010 – Robert McMaster

2009 - David M. Mark

2008 - Michael Phoenix

2007 - Duane Marble

2006 - David Unwin

2005 – David Dibiase

2004 – Karen Kemp

2003 – Keith Clarke

2002 – Michael Goodchild

2001 – Barbara Buttenfield

Call for Research Award Nominations

Source: http://ucgis2.org/event-item/call-research-award-nominations

 
Nomination deadline: February 1, 2013

The University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) Research Award is given to the creator(s) of a particularly outstanding research contribution to geographic information science recognized in 2013; but the contribution could have been made at any time prior to 2013.

Normally, the Research Award is awarded to an author of an outstanding research work or series of works published in a peer-reviewed medium. The committee will also consider other modes of expression of research results, including patents, software packages, and non-refereed publications. Note: This award is NOT for life-time achievement, but for a particular publication or product. Examples of past awardees include Mei-Po Kwan for the outstanding contribution of three landmark papers, Max Egenhofer for a landmark 1991 paper, and Ron Eastman and the IDRISI group for the 20-year contribution of that product. All researchers worldwide, except for the current members of the Research Award Committee (a subcommittee of the Research Committee), are eligible for the award. Nominations for the award can only be made by affiliates from UCGIS member institutions.

To nominate a researcher for the award, please submit the following to Chaowei Yang (cyang3@gmu.edu), Chair, UCGIS Research Committee, by February 1, 2013:

  1. A nominating cover letter (e-mail is acceptable), containing basic contact and affiliation information for the nominee, a brief summary of the nominee's contributions to GIScience research and education (not to exceed 1 page)
  2. A document describing and justifying the specific contributions of the nominee; a complete vita is not necessary, but please provide citations for published works (up to 2 pages).

The main criterion for choosing the awardee(s) is impact of the research achievement on the theory and/or practice of GIScience, or on research using GIS, or on geographic information technology. The Research Award Committee will review nominations and recommend an award winner for confirmation by the UCGIS Board of Directors, or choose to recommend that no award be given in a particular year. This is a great opportunity to recognize the outstanding work accomplished in our field. Send in your nominations for the 2013 UCGIS Research Award!

The award will be presented during the 2013 UCGIS Symposium in Washington, DC, May 21 – May 23, 2013.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR EFFORTS TOWARDS RECOGNIZING AN OUTSTANDING MEMBER OF OUR COMMUNITY!

Past Recipients of the UCGIS Research Award:

2012 – Michael Batty, College London – Urban Complexity and Simulation

2010 - Michael Goodchild, UCSB -  spatial data accuracy, visualizing error

2009 - Hanan Samet, U. of Maryland – spatial data structures

2008 - Mike Worboys, U. of Maine – object-oriented modeling

2007 - Ron Eastman, Clark – IDRISI GIS and image processing software

2006 - Frederico Fonseca, Penn State – ontologies for GIS

2005 - Mei-Po Kwan, Ohio State – space-time algorithms and visualizations

2004 - David Mark, SUNY-Buffalo – cognitive and linguistic aspects of spatial relations

2003 - Max Egenhofer, U. of Maine – mathematical theories underpinning GIScience

2002 - Reginald Golledge, UCSB – AAG presidential address on nature of geographic knowledge

Call for Workshop Proposals

UCGIS 2013 Symposium

Collaboration Across Communities: GIScience 2.0 and Beyond

Pre-Symposium Workshops on May 20, 2013

Symposium Dates: May 21-23, 2013

The UCGIS 2013 Symposium Program Committee invites proposals for pre-symposium workshops prior to the upcoming 2013 Symposium. The workshops will be either half or full day activities on the 20th of May, 2013, immediately prior to the symposium. The pre-symposium workshops should provide an intensive setting where participants will have the opportunity to address specific technical and thematic topics with an emphasis on exchange of ideas and professional development. Proposals should strive to align with the symposium theme of “Collaboration Across Communities,” however all meritorious proposals will be considered.

Faculty, staff and students at all UCGIS member institutions may propose a workshop. We particularly encourage proposals that focus on emerging topics and applications, on open challenges in GIScience research and education, and in interdisciplinary topics that will encourage exchange of ideas. The workshops are intended to complement the regular symposium programming and to facilitate more in-depth and involved modes of interaction.

To cover costs, it will be necessary to charge workshop participants a nominal workshop fee, separate from the main symposium registration. Workshop proposals may also include supplemental fees to cover the cost of materials. If a supplemental fee is required, this should be clearly articulated in the submitted proposal. UCGIS will review all proposals for quality and content relevant to the UCGIS Mission and Goals. UCGIS reserves the right to cancel any workshop due to inadequate registration.

All proposals should include the following:

  • Workshop leader name(s) and contact information
  • Workshop title
  • Workshop duration (half or whole day)
  • Workshop description (include: goal, narrative and expected outcomes)
  • Estimated number of participants (specify minimum and maximum if appropriate)
  • Supplemental fee per person if required

Workshop attendees need not need register for the full UCGIS 2013 Symposium, but are encouraged to do so.

Proposal Due Date: December 15, 2012

Questions maybe addressed to:

Steven D. Prager

UCGIS President-Elect

sdprager@uwyo.edu

USGS

Source: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/openfile/of2005-1001/htmldocs/datacatalog.htm

Link to USGS home page.
Coastal and Marine Geology Program

U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1001
USGS East-Coast Sediment Analysis: Procedures, Database, and GIS Data

By McMullen, K.Y., Paskevich, V.F., and Poppe, L.J. 

GIS DATA CATALOG (version 2.2)


Data on this publication are provided with geographic coordinates to allow the data to be integrated into a Geographic Information System (GIS).  A GIS is defined as a system of hardware and software to support the display, manipulation, and analysis of spatial data for mapping and complex data solving.  This integrated package provides researchers the ability to integrate, analyze and map the various datasets to help with economic and social policy-making decisions regarding the environment.

The data in this version of the publication have been updated from Poppe and others (2005). Errors in the previous version have been corrected and samples analyzed between 2005 and 2011 have been appended to the database. A suggested citation for the new version of the database is:

McMullen, K.Y., Paskevich, V.F., and Poppe, L.J., 2011, GIS data catalog (version 2.2), in Poppe, L.J., Williams, S.J., and Paskevich, V.F., eds., 2005, USGS east-coast sediment analysis: Procedures, database, and GIS data, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1001, available online at http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/openfile/of2005-1001/htmldocs/datacatalog.htm.

ArcGIS

My Note: I used a ligh grey background for clarity

ECSTDB2011arcmap_view.jpg

Image showing data displayed in Environmental Systems Research Institue's ArcGIS software.
Image showing data displayed in Environmental Systems Research Institute's ArcGIS software.

This project uses the Environmental Systems Research Institute's (ESRIArcView and ArcGIS software as its Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping tool. Data layers archived here should not require additional processing to be utilized within the ESRI software. This does not mean that a user will not wish to do additional processing, especially if utilizing a different GIS software package or spheroid, but that it is not necessary to do additional processing simply to utilize the data in its minimum archive format

For those who don't have the ESRI software or a compatible GIS data browser available on their computer, a free viewer, ArcExplorer, is available from ESRI. Currently ArcExplorer version 9.1 software is available for Microsoft Windows, UNIX, and Linux operating systems.  ArcExplorer version 9.0 is available for the  Macintosh OS X platform.  There is no prepared project file for use with ArcExplorer.  If the user chooses ArcExplorer, it will be necessary to add the selected data layers to their defined project file.

Each GIS data layer from this publication is cataloged below for easy access. The individual data layers are described below and include the shapefile name (e.g. ecstdb2011), which is linked to a browse graphic showing the data layer extent and coverage.   Selecting the data layer name will result in the browse graphic being displayed in a separate browser window.

Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata for the individual data layers is  provided in three versions (HTMLFAQ, text). Selecting associated metadata files from the table below will open the information in a new browser window.  An "Extensible Markup Languge" (XML) version of the metadata are also available in the individual data directories.  This version of the metadata is made available for use with ESRI's ArcCatalog software.

A 'zip' compressed, downloadable archive file containing the elements comprising the ESRI shapefile for each data layer is also provided. Compressed downloadable files were created using the Windows program WINZIP v8.0. For those users who do not have software capable of uncompressing the archived zip files, they may obtain a free version of the software from Winzip Computing, Inc. or Pkware, Inc.  In addition to the ESRI shapefile, the surficial sediment data layers are available in an ASCII text format and Microsoft Excel spreadsheet formats to allow users who may not have access to GIS software to have access to the source data in an alternate way to view and examine the datasets.  The first record of theASCII file and Excel spreadsheet contains the name of the data fields for that file.

SURFICIAL SEDIMENT

DIRECTORY: data/surficial_sediments

   
DATA LAYER NAME AND DESCRIPTION METADATA FILES

ecstdb2011 -- U.S. Geological Survey East-Coast Sediment Texture Database including samples analyzed through January 2011 (Geographic, WGS84)

Click here for the U.S. East Coast detail view

HTML
FAQ
text

Zip
(9 MB)
Excel
Text

My Note: I used all of these in Spotfire.


Skip Geology Data table and go to Basemap Data table.GEOLOGY

DIRECTORY: data/conmapsg

   
DATA LAYER NAME AND DESCRIPTION METADATA FILES

conmapsg - Continental Margin Mapping Program (CONMAP) sediment grainsize distribution for the United States East Coast Continental Margin Type: feature - polygon  shapefile

HTML
FAQ
TEXT

zip

My Note: I used this in Spotfire


Skip Sediment Data table and go to Bathymetry Contour Data table.BASEMAP DATA

DIRECTORY: data/basemaps

   
DATA LAYER NAME AND DESCRIPTION METADATA FILES

state_bounds - internal U.S. state boundaries Type: feature - polyline shapefile

HTML
FAQ
TEXT

zip

My Note: I imported this in Spotfire, but it is only the internal boundaries

srtm30plus-na_pctshade - SRTM30PLUS color-encoded shaded relief image of North America (approximately 1km)  Type: GeoTIFF image

HTML
FAQ
TEXT

zip

My Note: This is a very large TIFF file (556 MB)

srtm30plus-world_pctshade - SRTM30PLUS color encoded shaded relief world topography (approximately 4km)  Type: GeoTIFF image

HTML
FAQ
TEXT

zip

My Note: This is a very large TIFF file (166 MB)

 

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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
U.S. Geological Survey
Coastal and Marine Geology Program
Woods Hole Science Center 

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