Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Tile
    2. Slide 2 Begin With the End in Mind
    3. Slide 3 My Proces
    4. Slide 4 Bureau of Justice Statistics
    5. Slide 5 Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010
    6. Slide 6 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch
    7. Slide 7 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch
    8. Slide 8 Knowledge Base in Spreadsheet: Excel
    9. Slide 9 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    10. Slide 10 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    11. Slide 11Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    12. Slide 12 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    13. Slide 13 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    14. Slide 14 Conclusions and Recommendations
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Female Victims Of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010
  6. Press Release
  7. Report PDF
  8. Report ASCII
    1. Special Report
      1. Figure 1. Rape and sexual assault victimization rates among females, 1995–2010
    2. Highlights
    3. Measuring sexual violence using the NCVS
      1. Table 1. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by victim characteristics, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      2. Figure 2. Rape and sexual assault victimizations, by sex of victim, 1995-2010
      3. Table 2. Activity and location of female victims when rape or sexual assault victimization occurred, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      4. Table 3. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by number of offenders and victim-offender relationship, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      5. Table 4. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by perceived offender characteristics, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      6. Table 5. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by offender weapon possession, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      7. Table 6. Injured female victims of rape and sexual assault who received treatment, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      8. Table 7. Female victims of rape and sexual assault who received assistance from a victim service agency, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      9. Figure 3. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported to police, 1995–2010
      10. Table 8. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported and not reported to police, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      11. Table 9. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported and not reported to police, by most important reason for reporting or not reporting, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      12. Table 10. Rape or sexual assault victimizations against females with police response, by type of response, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      13. Table 11. Initial police response to rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
    4. Methodology
      1. Survey coverage
      2. Weighting adjustments for estimating household victimization
      3. Standard error computations
      4. Methodological changes to the NCVS in 2006
    5. Appendix Tables
    6. About
  9. Comma-delimited format (CSV)
  10. Help for using BJS products
  11. National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)
    1. About the Source Data
    2. Collection Period
    3. Questionnaires
    4. Documentation
    5. Methodology
    6. Publications & Products
    7. MORE PUBLICATIONS & PRODUCT THIS CAN BE A DATA SET
  12. NEXT

BJS

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Tile
    2. Slide 2 Begin With the End in Mind
    3. Slide 3 My Proces
    4. Slide 4 Bureau of Justice Statistics
    5. Slide 5 Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010
    6. Slide 6 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch
    7. Slide 7 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch
    8. Slide 8 Knowledge Base in Spreadsheet: Excel
    9. Slide 9 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    10. Slide 10 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    11. Slide 11Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    12. Slide 12 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    13. Slide 13 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    14. Slide 14 Conclusions and Recommendations
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Female Victims Of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010
  6. Press Release
  7. Report PDF
  8. Report ASCII
    1. Special Report
      1. Figure 1. Rape and sexual assault victimization rates among females, 1995–2010
    2. Highlights
    3. Measuring sexual violence using the NCVS
      1. Table 1. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by victim characteristics, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      2. Figure 2. Rape and sexual assault victimizations, by sex of victim, 1995-2010
      3. Table 2. Activity and location of female victims when rape or sexual assault victimization occurred, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      4. Table 3. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by number of offenders and victim-offender relationship, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      5. Table 4. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by perceived offender characteristics, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      6. Table 5. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by offender weapon possession, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      7. Table 6. Injured female victims of rape and sexual assault who received treatment, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      8. Table 7. Female victims of rape and sexual assault who received assistance from a victim service agency, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      9. Figure 3. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported to police, 1995–2010
      10. Table 8. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported and not reported to police, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      11. Table 9. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported and not reported to police, by most important reason for reporting or not reporting, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      12. Table 10. Rape or sexual assault victimizations against females with police response, by type of response, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      13. Table 11. Initial police response to rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
    4. Methodology
      1. Survey coverage
      2. Weighting adjustments for estimating household victimization
      3. Standard error computations
      4. Methodological changes to the NCVS in 2006
    5. Appendix Tables
    6. About
  9. Comma-delimited format (CSV)
  10. Help for using BJS products
  11. National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)
    1. About the Source Data
    2. Collection Period
    3. Questionnaires
    4. Documentation
    5. Methodology
    6. Publications & Products
    7. MORE PUBLICATIONS & PRODUCT THIS CAN BE A DATA SET
  12. NEXT

  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Tile
    2. Slide 2 Begin With the End in Mind
    3. Slide 3 My Proces
    4. Slide 4 Bureau of Justice Statistics
    5. Slide 5 Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010
    6. Slide 6 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch
    7. Slide 7 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch
    8. Slide 8 Knowledge Base in Spreadsheet: Excel
    9. Slide 9 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    10. Slide 10 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    11. Slide 11Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    12. Slide 12 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    13. Slide 13 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire
    14. Slide 14 Conclusions and Recommendations
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Female Victims Of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010
  6. Press Release
  7. Report PDF
  8. Report ASCII
    1. Special Report
      1. Figure 1. Rape and sexual assault victimization rates among females, 1995–2010
    2. Highlights
    3. Measuring sexual violence using the NCVS
      1. Table 1. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by victim characteristics, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      2. Figure 2. Rape and sexual assault victimizations, by sex of victim, 1995-2010
      3. Table 2. Activity and location of female victims when rape or sexual assault victimization occurred, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      4. Table 3. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by number of offenders and victim-offender relationship, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      5. Table 4. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by perceived offender characteristics, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      6. Table 5. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, by offender weapon possession, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      7. Table 6. Injured female victims of rape and sexual assault who received treatment, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      8. Table 7. Female victims of rape and sexual assault who received assistance from a victim service agency, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      9. Figure 3. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported to police, 1995–2010
      10. Table 8. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported and not reported to police, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      11. Table 9. Rape and sexual assault victimizations against females reported and not reported to police, by most important reason for reporting or not reporting, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      12. Table 10. Rape or sexual assault victimizations against females with police response, by type of response, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
      13. Table 11. Initial police response to rape and sexual assault victimizations against females, 1994–1998, 1999–2004, and 2005–2010
    4. Methodology
      1. Survey coverage
      2. Weighting adjustments for estimating household victimization
      3. Standard error computations
      4. Methodological changes to the NCVS in 2006
    5. Appendix Tables
    6. About
  9. Comma-delimited format (CSV)
  10. Help for using BJS products
  11. National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)
    1. About the Source Data
    2. Collection Period
    3. Questionnaires
    4. Documentation
    5. Methodology
    6. Publications & Products
    7. MORE PUBLICATIONS & PRODUCT THIS CAN BE A DATA SET
  12. NEXT

Story

IN PROCESS

Building this was like a Hackathon but without code!

Slides

Slide 1 Tile

http://semanticommunity.info/

http://gov.aol.com/bloggers/brand-niemann/

http://semanticommunity.info/Big_Data_Symposia

BrandNiemann03102013Slide1.PNG

Slide 4 Bureau of Justice Statistics

http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm

BrandNiemann03102013Slide4.PNG

Slide 5 Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010

http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?t...etail&iid=4594

BrandNiemann03102013Slide5.PNG

Slide 6 Knowledge Base*: MindTouch

http://semanticommunity.info/Big_Data_Symposia/BJS

BrandNiemann03102013Slide6.PNG

Slide 9 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire

Web Player

BrandNiemann03102013Slide9.PNG

Slide 10 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire

Web Player

BrandNiemann03102013Slide10.PNG

Slide 11Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire

Web Player

BrandNiemann03102013Slide11.PNG

Slide 12 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire

Web Player

BrandNiemann03102013Slide12.PNG

Slide 13 Spreadsheet in Dashboard: Spotfire

Web Player

BrandNiemann03102013Slide13.PNG

Slide 14 Conclusions and Recommendations

BrandNiemann03102013Slide14.PNG

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Error: Embedded data could not be displayed. Use Google Chrome

Research Notes

 

Female Victims Of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010

To cite this product, use the following link:
http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=4594

Marcus Berzofsky, Dr.P.H., RTI, Christopher Krebs, Ph.D., RTI, Lynn Langton, Ph.D., BJS, Michael Planty, Ph.D., BJS, Hope Smiley-McDonald, Ph.D., RTI

March 7, 2013    NCJ 240655

Presents trends in the rate of completed or attempted rape or sexual assault against females from 1995 to 2010. The report examines demographic characteristics of female victims of sexual violence and characteristics of the offender and incident, including victim-offender relationship, whether the offender had a weapon, and the location of the victimization. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of female victims of sexual violence who suffered an injury and received formal medical treatment, reported the victimization to the police, and received assistance from a victim service provider. Data are from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), which collects information on nonfatal crimes, reported and not reported to the police, against persons age 12 or older from a nationally representative sample of U.S. households.

Highlights:

  • From 1995 to 2010, the estimated annual rate of female rape or sexual assault victimizations declined 58%, from 5.0 victimizations per 1,000 females age 12 or older to 2.1 per 1,000.
  • In 2005-10, females who were age 34 or younger, who lived in lower income households, and who lived in rural areas experienced some of the highest rates of sexual violence.
  • In 2005-10, the offender was armed with a gun, knife, or other weapon in 11% of rape or sexual assault victimizations.
  • In 2005-10, 78% of sexual violence involved an offender who was a family member, intimate partner, friend, or acquaintance.

Press Release 
PDF (1.4M)
ASCII file (34K)
Comma-delimited format (CSV) (Zip format 26K)

Help for using BJS products

About the Source Data
National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)

My Note: See the above links copied below

Press Release

Source: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub...fvsv9410pr.cfm

ADVANCE FOR RELEASE AT 10:00 A.M. EST Bureau of Justice Statistics
THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013                                     Contact: Kara McCarthy (202) 307-1241
HTTP://WWW.BJS.GOV/ After hours: (202) 598-9320

OVER 60 PERCENT DECLINE IN SEXUAL VIOLENCE AGAINST FEMALES 
FROM 1995 TO 2010

WASHINGTON – From 1995 to 2005, sexual violence against U.S. female residents age 12 or older declined 64 percent from 5.0 per 1,000 females to 1.8, and remained unchanged through 2010, according to a report, Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010, released today by the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS).

These estimates of sexual violence from 1994 to 2010, averaged across two years and reported as the most recent year, are based on data from the annual National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). Sexual violence against females includes completed, attempted, or threatened rape or sexual assault. In 2010, females experienced 270,000 rape or sexual assault victimizations at a rate of about two victimizations per 1,000 females age 12 or older.

In 1995, 29 percent of rape or sexual assault victimizations against females were reported to the police. This percentage increased to 56 percent in 2003 before declining to 35 percent in 2010. Of the sexual victimizations reported to the police in 2005-10, about 64 percent were reported to the police directly by the victims, 10 percent by another household member and 14 percent by an official other than the police. About 84 percent of the victims stated that the police came to the victim after being notified.

When police responded after being notified, the most common police activity according to the victim was to take a report. In 2005-10, police took a report in 86 percent of reported victimizations and questioned witnesses or conducted a search for the offender in 48 percent of reported victimizations. The percentage of reported victimizations in which the police collected evidence increased from eight percent in 1994-98 to 19 percent in 2005-10.

The percentage of reported rape or sexual assault victimizations that resulted in an arrest either at the scene or during a follow-up investigation decreased from 47 percent in 1994-98 to 31 percent in 2005-10. Overall, out of the 283,200 annual average rape or sexual assault victimizations in 2005-10, both reported and not reported to the police, approximately 12 percent resulted in an arrest.  

Other findings showed—

  • The majority of sexual violence against females involved someone the victim knew. In 2005-10, 78 percent of sexual violence involved an offender who was a family member, intimate partner, friend or acquaintance.
  • About 38 percent of sexual violence was committed by a friend or acquaintance, 34 percent by an intimate partner (former or current spouse, girlfriend, boyfriend) and 6 percent by a relative or family member. Strangers committed about 22 percent of all sexual violence, a percentage that remained unchanged from 1994 to 2010.
  • In 2005-10, the offender was reported to be armed with a gun, knife or other weapon in 11 percent of rape or sexual assault victimizations.
  • In 2005-10, about 58 percent of female victims of sexual violence suffered a physical injury during the attack, such as cuts, bruises, internal injuries, broken bones, gunshot wounds or rape injuries. This percentage remained unchanged from 1994-98 to 2005-10.
  • The percentage of females who were physically injured during a rape or sexual assault and received some type of treatment for their injuries increased from 26 percent in 1994-98 to 35 percent in 2005-10.
  • In 2005-10, 80 percent of female rape or sexual assault victims who were treated for physical injuries received care in a hospital, doctor’s office or emergency room as compared to 65 percent in 1994-98.
  • In 2005-10, about one in four (23 percent) rape or sexual assault victims received help or advice from a victim service agency.

The NCVS is the largest data collection on criminal victimization independent of crimes reported by law enforcement agencies to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR)—the nation’s other key measure of the extent and nature of crime in the U.S. During 2010, about 81,950 households and 146,570 persons were interviewed for the NCVS. The NCVS is a self-reporting survey with the first interview conducted in-person. Follow-up in-person or telephone interviews are conducted every six-months for three years.

The report, Female Victims of Sexual Violence, 1994-2010 (NCJ 240655), was written by BJS statisticians Michael Planty, Ph.D., and Lynn Langton, Ph.D., and Christopher Krebs, Ph.D., Marcus Berzofsky, Dr.P.H., and Hope Smiley-McDonald, Ph.D., of RTI International. More information on criminal victimization and sexual violence from 1994 to 2010 is available from the NCVS Victimization Analysis Tool on the BJS website at http://www.bjs.gov/. The full text of the report, related documents and other BJS statistical resources can also be found on the BJS website.

# # #

The Office of Justice Programs (OJP), headed by Acting Assistant Attorney General Mary Lou Leary, provides federal leadership in developing the nation’s capacity to prevent and control crime, administer justice, and assist victims. OJP has six components: the Bureau of Justice Assistance; the Bureau of Justice Statistics; the National Institute of Justice; the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; the Office for Victims of Crime; and the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking. More information about OJP can be found at http://www.ojp.gov.


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