Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Budget Authority
    2. Slide 2 Outlays
    3. Slide 3 Receipts
    4. Slide 4 Data Ecosystem
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
  6. The Budget Message of the President
  7. Mid-Session Review
    1. Transmittal Letter
    2. List of Tables
    3. Summary
      1. Strengthening the Economic Recovery
      2. The Role of Deficit Reduction in Promoting Sustained Economic Growth and Job Creation
      3. Replacing Sequestration With Balanced Deficit Reduction, While Investing in the Middle Class and America's Future
  8. The Budget
  9. Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Overview
    1. Key Budget Facts
      1. Making America a Magnet for Jobs
      2. Building a 21st Century Infrastructure
      3. Equipping Americans with the Skills They Need
      4. Making the Tax Code More Simple and Fair
      5. Ensuring Hard Work Leads to a Decent Living
      6. Cutting the Deficit in a Balanced Way
  10. Analytical Perspectives
    1. By Section
    2. Supplemental Materials
    3. Spreadsheets of Select Tables
  11. Historical Tables
  12. Supplemental Materials
    1. Supporting Documents
    2. Federal Credit Supplement Spreadsheets
    3. Tax Expenditures Spreadsheet
    4. Public Budget Database
    5. History of Economic Assumptions
    6. Long Range Budget Projections
  13. Appendix
    1. Detailed Budget Estimates by Agency
    2. Other Materials
  14. Supplementals, Amendments, and Releases
  15. OMB Contributors to the 2014 Budget
  16. Fact Sheets on Key Issues
  17. Past Budgets
  18. Public Budget Databases Users Guide
    1. 1. Data Sources and Limitations
      1. a. Sources of Data
      2. b. Fiscal Years
      3. c. Units of Measure
      4. d. Limitations
      5. e. Further Information
    2. 2. Data Files and File Formats
      1. a. Spreadsheet Format
      2. b. File Names, Contents, and Sequence
    3. 3. Categorization of Budget Data
      1. a. Budget Authority and Outlay Files
      2. b. Receipts Files
    4. 4. Description of the Fields in the Outlay Files
    5. 5. Description of the Fields in the Budget Authority Files
    6. 6. Description of the Fields in the Receipts Files
    7. 7. Reference Tables
      1. Table 1. Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes
        1. 001 Legislative Branch
        2. 002 Judicial Branch
        3. 005 Department of Agriculture
        4. 006 Department of Commerce
        5. 007 Department of Defense—Military Programs
        6. 009 Department of Health and Human Services
        7. 010 Department of the Interior
        8. 011 Department of Justice
        9. 012 Department of Labor
        10. 014 Department of State
        11. 015 Department of the Treasury
        12. Social Security Administration
        13. 018 Department of Education
        14. 019 Department of Energy
        15. 020 00 Environmental Protection Agency
        16. 021 Department of Transportation
        17. 023 General Services Administration
        18. 024 Department of Homeland Security
        19. 025 Department of Housing and Urban Development
        20. 026 00 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
        21. 027 00 Office of Personnel Management
        22. 028 00 Small Business Administration
        23. 029 Department of Veterans Affairs
        24. 100 Executive Office of the President
        25. Other Independent Agencies
        26. 184 International Assistance Programs
        27. 349 District of Columbia
        28. 357 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
        29. 360 00 Federal Election Commission
        30. 362 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
        31. 900 Allowances
        32. 902 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
        33. 930 Miscellaneous Receipts Below the Reporting Threshold
      2. Table 2. Listing of Functions and Subfunctions
        1. 050 National Defense
        2. 150 International Affairs
        3. 250 General Science, Space, and Technology
        4. 270 Energy
        5. 300 Natural Resources and Environment
        6. 350 Agriculture
        7. 370 Commerce and Housing Credit
        8. 400 Transportation
        9. 450 Community and Regional Development
        10. 500 Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services
        11. 550 Health
        12. 570 Medicare
        13. 600 Income Security
        14. 650 Social Security
        15. 700 Veterans Benefits and Services
        16. 750 Administration of Justice
        17. 800 General Government
        18. 900 Net Interest
        19. 920 Allowances
        20. 950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
      3. Table 3. Listing of Source Categories for Receipts
        1. 931
        2. 932
        3. 933
        4. 934
        5. 935
        6. 936
        7. 937
        8. 938

The Presidents Budget for Fiscal Year 2014

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Budget Authority
    2. Slide 2 Outlays
    3. Slide 3 Receipts
    4. Slide 4 Data Ecosystem
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
  6. The Budget Message of the President
  7. Mid-Session Review
    1. Transmittal Letter
    2. List of Tables
    3. Summary
      1. Strengthening the Economic Recovery
      2. The Role of Deficit Reduction in Promoting Sustained Economic Growth and Job Creation
      3. Replacing Sequestration With Balanced Deficit Reduction, While Investing in the Middle Class and America's Future
  8. The Budget
  9. Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Overview
    1. Key Budget Facts
      1. Making America a Magnet for Jobs
      2. Building a 21st Century Infrastructure
      3. Equipping Americans with the Skills They Need
      4. Making the Tax Code More Simple and Fair
      5. Ensuring Hard Work Leads to a Decent Living
      6. Cutting the Deficit in a Balanced Way
  10. Analytical Perspectives
    1. By Section
    2. Supplemental Materials
    3. Spreadsheets of Select Tables
  11. Historical Tables
  12. Supplemental Materials
    1. Supporting Documents
    2. Federal Credit Supplement Spreadsheets
    3. Tax Expenditures Spreadsheet
    4. Public Budget Database
    5. History of Economic Assumptions
    6. Long Range Budget Projections
  13. Appendix
    1. Detailed Budget Estimates by Agency
    2. Other Materials
  14. Supplementals, Amendments, and Releases
  15. OMB Contributors to the 2014 Budget
  16. Fact Sheets on Key Issues
  17. Past Budgets
  18. Public Budget Databases Users Guide
    1. 1. Data Sources and Limitations
      1. a. Sources of Data
      2. b. Fiscal Years
      3. c. Units of Measure
      4. d. Limitations
      5. e. Further Information
    2. 2. Data Files and File Formats
      1. a. Spreadsheet Format
      2. b. File Names, Contents, and Sequence
    3. 3. Categorization of Budget Data
      1. a. Budget Authority and Outlay Files
      2. b. Receipts Files
    4. 4. Description of the Fields in the Outlay Files
    5. 5. Description of the Fields in the Budget Authority Files
    6. 6. Description of the Fields in the Receipts Files
    7. 7. Reference Tables
      1. Table 1. Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes
        1. 001 Legislative Branch
        2. 002 Judicial Branch
        3. 005 Department of Agriculture
        4. 006 Department of Commerce
        5. 007 Department of Defense—Military Programs
        6. 009 Department of Health and Human Services
        7. 010 Department of the Interior
        8. 011 Department of Justice
        9. 012 Department of Labor
        10. 014 Department of State
        11. 015 Department of the Treasury
        12. Social Security Administration
        13. 018 Department of Education
        14. 019 Department of Energy
        15. 020 00 Environmental Protection Agency
        16. 021 Department of Transportation
        17. 023 General Services Administration
        18. 024 Department of Homeland Security
        19. 025 Department of Housing and Urban Development
        20. 026 00 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
        21. 027 00 Office of Personnel Management
        22. 028 00 Small Business Administration
        23. 029 Department of Veterans Affairs
        24. 100 Executive Office of the President
        25. Other Independent Agencies
        26. 184 International Assistance Programs
        27. 349 District of Columbia
        28. 357 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
        29. 360 00 Federal Election Commission
        30. 362 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
        31. 900 Allowances
        32. 902 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
        33. 930 Miscellaneous Receipts Below the Reporting Threshold
      2. Table 2. Listing of Functions and Subfunctions
        1. 050 National Defense
        2. 150 International Affairs
        3. 250 General Science, Space, and Technology
        4. 270 Energy
        5. 300 Natural Resources and Environment
        6. 350 Agriculture
        7. 370 Commerce and Housing Credit
        8. 400 Transportation
        9. 450 Community and Regional Development
        10. 500 Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services
        11. 550 Health
        12. 570 Medicare
        13. 600 Income Security
        14. 650 Social Security
        15. 700 Veterans Benefits and Services
        16. 750 Administration of Justice
        17. 800 General Government
        18. 900 Net Interest
        19. 920 Allowances
        20. 950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
      3. Table 3. Listing of Source Categories for Receipts
        1. 931
        2. 932
        3. 933
        4. 934
        5. 935
        6. 936
        7. 937
        8. 938

  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Budget Authority
    2. Slide 2 Outlays
    3. Slide 3 Receipts
    4. Slide 4 Data Ecosystem
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2014
  6. The Budget Message of the President
  7. Mid-Session Review
    1. Transmittal Letter
    2. List of Tables
    3. Summary
      1. Strengthening the Economic Recovery
      2. The Role of Deficit Reduction in Promoting Sustained Economic Growth and Job Creation
      3. Replacing Sequestration With Balanced Deficit Reduction, While Investing in the Middle Class and America's Future
  8. The Budget
  9. Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Overview
    1. Key Budget Facts
      1. Making America a Magnet for Jobs
      2. Building a 21st Century Infrastructure
      3. Equipping Americans with the Skills They Need
      4. Making the Tax Code More Simple and Fair
      5. Ensuring Hard Work Leads to a Decent Living
      6. Cutting the Deficit in a Balanced Way
  10. Analytical Perspectives
    1. By Section
    2. Supplemental Materials
    3. Spreadsheets of Select Tables
  11. Historical Tables
  12. Supplemental Materials
    1. Supporting Documents
    2. Federal Credit Supplement Spreadsheets
    3. Tax Expenditures Spreadsheet
    4. Public Budget Database
    5. History of Economic Assumptions
    6. Long Range Budget Projections
  13. Appendix
    1. Detailed Budget Estimates by Agency
    2. Other Materials
  14. Supplementals, Amendments, and Releases
  15. OMB Contributors to the 2014 Budget
  16. Fact Sheets on Key Issues
  17. Past Budgets
  18. Public Budget Databases Users Guide
    1. 1. Data Sources and Limitations
      1. a. Sources of Data
      2. b. Fiscal Years
      3. c. Units of Measure
      4. d. Limitations
      5. e. Further Information
    2. 2. Data Files and File Formats
      1. a. Spreadsheet Format
      2. b. File Names, Contents, and Sequence
    3. 3. Categorization of Budget Data
      1. a. Budget Authority and Outlay Files
      2. b. Receipts Files
    4. 4. Description of the Fields in the Outlay Files
    5. 5. Description of the Fields in the Budget Authority Files
    6. 6. Description of the Fields in the Receipts Files
    7. 7. Reference Tables
      1. Table 1. Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes
        1. 001 Legislative Branch
        2. 002 Judicial Branch
        3. 005 Department of Agriculture
        4. 006 Department of Commerce
        5. 007 Department of Defense—Military Programs
        6. 009 Department of Health and Human Services
        7. 010 Department of the Interior
        8. 011 Department of Justice
        9. 012 Department of Labor
        10. 014 Department of State
        11. 015 Department of the Treasury
        12. Social Security Administration
        13. 018 Department of Education
        14. 019 Department of Energy
        15. 020 00 Environmental Protection Agency
        16. 021 Department of Transportation
        17. 023 General Services Administration
        18. 024 Department of Homeland Security
        19. 025 Department of Housing and Urban Development
        20. 026 00 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
        21. 027 00 Office of Personnel Management
        22. 028 00 Small Business Administration
        23. 029 Department of Veterans Affairs
        24. 100 Executive Office of the President
        25. Other Independent Agencies
        26. 184 International Assistance Programs
        27. 349 District of Columbia
        28. 357 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
        29. 360 00 Federal Election Commission
        30. 362 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
        31. 900 Allowances
        32. 902 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
        33. 930 Miscellaneous Receipts Below the Reporting Threshold
      2. Table 2. Listing of Functions and Subfunctions
        1. 050 National Defense
        2. 150 International Affairs
        3. 250 General Science, Space, and Technology
        4. 270 Energy
        5. 300 Natural Resources and Environment
        6. 350 Agriculture
        7. 370 Commerce and Housing Credit
        8. 400 Transportation
        9. 450 Community and Regional Development
        10. 500 Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services
        11. 550 Health
        12. 570 Medicare
        13. 600 Income Security
        14. 650 Social Security
        15. 700 Veterans Benefits and Services
        16. 750 Administration of Justice
        17. 800 General Government
        18. 900 Net Interest
        19. 920 Allowances
        20. 950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
      3. Table 3. Listing of Source Categories for Receipts
        1. 931
        2. 932
        3. 933
        4. 934
        5. 935
        6. 936
        7. 937
        8. 938

Story

The President’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget as Big Data

Slides (see below)

I have been working on an OMB Data Visualization Tool Requirements Analysis and thought I should also work in parallel on OMB data sets that could and should be used in those tools. The objective is to drag and drop a well-designed spreadsheet on the tool and have it automatically generate dynamically linked visualizations, or at least provide a guided analysis.

I organized The President’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Web pages and links to PDF, CSV, XLS, and XML files in a knowledge base mashup and spreadsheet to improve structure (e.g. PDF to strucuture), search (all content in one wiki page), data visualizations (pre-conditioning of data) in MindTouch and Spotfire.

Public Budget Database is available from the White House and GPO as follows:

The result is a valued added spreadsheet that can be used in other visualization tools and in a Spotfire multiple adjacent dynamically linked visualizations and a multiple data set ecosystem.

A further drill-down into the budget data is found at Analytical Perspectives Knowledge Base and Spotfire Web Player

This is where the data science work begins in earnest to answer the questions:

  • Do we trust the raw data?
  • Do we trust the aggregations of the data?
  • Do we trust the spreadsheets?
  • Do we trust the calculations in the aggregations and spreadsheets?
  • Do we believe the statistics and visualizations?
  • Do we believe the interpretation and conclusions?

MORE WORK IN PROCESS

Slides

Slide 1 Budget Authority

Budget2014-Spotfire-Slide1.png

Slide 2 Outlays

Budget2014-Spotfire-Slide2.png

Slide 3 Receipts

Budget2014-Spotfire-Slide3.png

Slide 4 Data Ecosystem

Budget2014-Spotfire-Slide4.png

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Research Notes

I wanted Table S–6. Proposed Budget by Category as a Percent of GDP in Excel from the MSR so I tried to convert it using Adobe Export PDF to Excel and got a result, but not in a usable Excel format.

I converted spec.pdf to spec.docx.

See Previous: https://silverspotfire.tibco.com/us/...t2013-Spotfire

The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2014

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget

The President’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget demonstrates that we can make critical investments to strengthen the middle class, create jobs, and grow the economy while continuing to cut the deficit in a balanced way.

The President believes we must invest in the true engine of America’s economic growth – a rising and thriving middle class.  He is focused on addressing three fundamental questions: How do we attract more jobs to our shores? How do we equip our people with the skills needed to do the jobs of the 21st Century? How do we make sure hard work leads to a decent living?  The Budget presents the President’s plan to address each of these questions.

To make America once again a magnet for jobs, the Budget invests in high-tech manufacturing and innovation, clean energy, and infrastructure, while cutting red tape to help businesses grow.  To give workers the skills they need to compete in the global economy, it invests in education from pre-school to job training.  To ensure hard work is rewarded, it raises the minimum wage to $9 an hour so a hard day’s work pays more. 

The Budget does all of these things as part of a comprehensive plan that reduces the deficit and puts the Nation on a sound fiscal course.  Every new initiative in the plan is fully paid for, so they do not add a single dime to the deficit.  The Budget also incorporates the President’s compromise offer to House Speaker Boehner to achieve another $1.8 trillion in deficit reduction in a balanced way.  When combined with the deficit reduction already achieved, this will allow us to exceed the goal of $4 trillion in deficit reduction, while growing the economy and strengthening the middle class.  By including this compromise proposal in the Budget, the President is demonstrating his willingness to make tough choices and his seriousness about finding common ground to further reduce the deficit.

The Budget Message of the President

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/budget/fy2014/assets/message.pdf (PDF)

To the Congress of the United States:

Thanks to the hard work and determination of the American people, we have made significant progress over the last 4 years. After a decade of war, our brave men and women in uniform are coming home. After years of recession, our businesses have created over six million new jobs. We buy more American cars than we have in 5 years, and less foreign oil than we have in 20 years. Our housing market is healing, our stock market is rebounding, and consumers, patients, and homeowners enjoy stronger protections than ever before.

But we know that there are millions of Americans whose hard work and dedication have not yet been rewarded. Our economy is adding jobs—but too many people still cannot find full-time employment. Corporate profits have skyrocketed to all-time highs—but for more than a decade, wages and incomes have barely budged.

 
It is our generation’s task to reignite the true engine of America’s economic growth—a rising, thriving middle class. It is our unfinished task to restore the basic bargain that built this country—the idea that if you work hard and meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead, no matter where you come from, no matter what you look like, or whom you love.
 
It is our unfinished task to make sure that this Government works on behalf of the many, and not just the few; that it encourages free enterprise, rewards individual initiative, and opens the doors of opportunity to every child across this great Nation.
 
A growing economy that creates good, middle class jobs—this must be the North Star that guides our efforts. Every day, we should ask ourselves three questions as a Nation: How do we attract more jobs to our shores? How do we equip our people with the skills they need to get those jobs? And how do we make sure that hard work leads to a decent living?
 
This Budget seeks to answer each of these questions.
 
Our first priority is making America a magnet for new jobs and manufacturing. After shedding jobs for more than 10 years, our manufacturers have added more than 500,000 jobs over the past 3 years. Companies large and small are increasingly deciding to bring jobs back to America.
 
To accelerate this trend, the Budget builds on the success of the manufacturing innovation institute we created in Youngstown, Ohio last year, and calls for the creation of a network of 15 of these hubs across the Nation. In these innovation hubs, businesses will partner with universities and Federal agencies to turn regions around our country into global centers of high-tech jobs.
 
The Budget also includes new initiatives to support manufacturing communities, including a new tax credit to strengthen their ability to attract investments and jobs. And it expands my Administration’s SelectUSA initiative to help draw businesses and investment from around the world
to our shores.
 
If we want to make the best products, we also have to invest in the best ideas. That is why the Budget maintains a world-class commitment to science and research, targeting resources to those areas most likely to contribute directly to the creation of transformational technologies that can create the businesses and jobs of the future.
 
No area holds more promise than our investments in American energy. The Budget continues to advance my “all-of-the-above” strategy on energy, investing in clean energy research and development; promoting energy efficiency in our cars, homes, and businesses; encouraging responsible domestic energy production; and launching new efforts to combat the threat of climate change.
 
Modeled after my successful Race to the Top education reform effort, the Budget includes a new Race to the Top energy efficiency challenge for States, rewarding those that implement the most effective policies to cut energy waste. And it establishes a new Energy Security Trust funded by royalty revenue from oil and gas leases to support initiatives to shift our cars and trucks off oil, cutting our Nation’s reliance on foreign oil.
 
Over the last 4 years, we have begun the hard work of rebuilding our Nation’s infrastructure. We have built or improved over 350,000 miles of road and more than 6,000 miles of rail. And we have repaired or replaced over 20,000 bridges. But to compete in the 21st Century economy and become a magnet for jobs, we must do more. We need to repair our existing infrastructure, and invest in the infrastructure of tomorrow, including high-speed rail, high-tech schools, and self-healing power grids.
 
These investments will both lay the foundation for long-term economic growth and put workers back on the job now.
 
My Budget includes $50 billion for up-front infrastructure investments, including a “Fix-it-First” program that makes an immediate investment to put people to work as soon as possible on our most urgent repairs, like the nearly 70,000 structurally-deficient bridges across the country. And to make sure taxpayers do not shoulder the whole burden, the Budget creates a Rebuild America Partnership to attract private capital to upgrade what our businesses need most: modern ports to move our goods; modern pipelines to withstand a storm; and modern schools worthy of our children.
 
The Budget also supports efforts I announced earlier this year to modernize and improve the efficiency of the Federal permitting process, cutting through the red tape that has been holding back even some of the most carefully planned infrastructure projects. These efforts will help us to achieve the new goal I set to cut timelines in half for infrastructure projects, while creating new incentives for better outcomes for communities and the environment.
 
All of these initiatives in manufacturing, energy, and infrastructure will help entrepreneurs and small business owners expand and create new jobs. But none of it will matter unless we also equip our citizens with the skills and training to fill those jobs.
 
And that has to start at the earliest possible age. But today, fewer than 3 in 10 4-year-olds are enrolled in a high-quality preschool program, and the high cost of private preschool puts too much of a financial burden on middle class families.
 
The Budget therefore includes a proposal that ensures 4-year-olds across the country have access to high-quality preschool education through a landmark new initiative in partnership with the States. And it increases the availability of early learning for our youngest children to help their growth and development during the formative early years of life.
 
Providing a year of free, public preschool education for 4-year-old children is an important investment in our future. It will give all our kids the best start in life, helping them perform better in elementary school and ultimately helping them, and the country, be better prepared for the demands of the global economy. Not only that, it could save hard-working families thousands of dollars each year in child care costs. This is an investment we need to make, and it is fully paid for in this Budget by imposing a new tax on every pack of cigarettes sold.
 
The Budget also builds on the historic reforms made during my first term to improve our elementary and secondary school system by rewarding excellence and promoting innovation. To help ensure that our high schools are putting our kids on a path to college and a good job, the Budget includes a new competitive fund that will help redesign America’s high schools to prepare students with the real world skills they need to find a job right away or go to college. The fund rewards schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)—the skills today’s employers seek to fill the jobs available right now and in the future.
 
Even with better high schools, most young people will still need some higher education. Through tax credits, grants, and better loans, we have made college more affordable for millions of students and families over the last 4 years. But skyrocketing costs are still pricing too many young people out of a higher education, or saddling them with unsustainable debt. And taxpayers cannot continue to subsidize higher and higher costs for higher education.
 
To encourage colleges to do their part to keep costs down, the Budget includes reforms that will ensure affordability and value are considered in determining which colleges receive certain types of Federal aid. My Administration has also released a new “College Scorecard” that parents and students can use to compare schools.
 
To further ensure our educational system is preparing students for careers in the 21st Century economy, the Budget includes additional measures to promote STEM education, such as launching a new STEM Master Teacher Corps, to leverage the expertise of some of America’s best and brightest teachers in science and mathematics, and to elevate the teaching of these subjects nationwide. It also includes a reorganization and consolidation of STEM education programs to improve the effectiveness of Federal investments in this area.
 
The Budget takes other critical steps to grow our economy, create jobs, and strengthen the middle class. It implements the Affordable Care Act, giving every American access to the high-quality, affordable health care coverage they deserve, and reducing the deficit by more than $1 trillion over the next two decades. It implements Wall Street reform, ending too-big-to-fail and protecting consumers against the abuses and reckless behavior that contributed to the financial collapse in 2008. And it includes measures to strengthen our housing market and ensure that every responsible homeowner has the opportunity to refinance at today’s rates, saving $3,000 a year on average.
 
Our economy is stronger when we harness the talents and ingenuity of striving, hopeful immigrants.That is why I have proposed a plan to fix our broken immigration system that secures our borders, cracks down on employers who hire undocumented workers, attracts highly-skilled entrepreneurs and engineers to help create jobs and drive economic growth, and establishes a responsible pathway to earned citizenship—a path that includes passing a background check, paying taxes and a meaningful penalty, learning English, and going to the back of the line behind the folks trying to come here legally. The Budget makes investments that will make our immigration system more efficient and fair and lay a foundation for this permanent, common-sense reform.
 
The Budget also builds on the progress made over the last 4 years to expand opportunity for every American and every community willing to do the work to lift themselves up. It creates new ladders of opportunity to ensure that hard work leads to a decent living. It rewards hard work by increasing the minimum wage to $9 an hour so an honest day’s work pays more. It partners with communities by identifying Promise Zones to help rebuild from the recession. It creates pathways to jobs for the long-term unemployed and youth who have been hardest hit by the downturn. And it strengthens families by removing financial deterrents to marriage and supporting the role of fathers.
 
We also know that economic growth can only be achieved and sustained if America is safe and secure, both at home and abroad. At home, the Budget supports my initiative to help protect our kids, reduce gun violence, and expand access to mental health services. We can protect our Second Amendment rights while coming together around reforms like eliminating background check loopholes to make it harder for criminals to get their hands on a gun—common-sense reforms that will help protect our kids from the scourge of gun violence that has plagued too many communities across the country. To confront threats outside our borders, the Budget ensures our military remains the finest and best-equipped military force the world has ever known, even as we wind down more than a decade of war.
 
Already, we have brought home more than 30,000 of our brave servicemembers from Afghanistan. Our remaining forces are moving into a support role, with Afghan security forces taking the lead. And over the next year, another 34,000 American troops will come home. This drawdown will continue and, by the end of next year, our war in Afghanistan will be over. Beyond 2014, the Budget supports our continued commitment to a unified and sovereign Afghanistan.
 
To maintain our national security, the Budget supports our ongoing fight against terrorists, like al Qaeda. The organization that attacked us on 9/11 is a shadow of its former self. But different al Qaeda affiliates and extremist groups have emerged—from the Arabian Peninsula to Africa. We will confront these emerging security challenges through the full range of U.S. capabilities and tools, including diplomatic, security, intelligence, and economic development.
 
The Budget also provides the resources we need to act on our commitment to and interests in global development, by promoting food security that reduces dependence and increases prosperity; by investing in the increasingly successful drive toward an AIDS-free generation; and by maintaining our leadership as a global provider of humanitarian assistance that saves lives and reflects American values.
 
We must also confront new dangers, like cyber attacks, that threaten our Nation’s infrastructure, businesses, and people. The Budget supports the expansion of Government-wide efforts to counter the full scope of cyber threats, and strengthens our ability to collaborate with State and local governments, our partners overseas, and the private sector to improve our overall cybersecurity.
 
The Budget also focuses resources on the Asia-Pacific region, reasserting American leadership and promoting security, stability, democracy, and economic growth.
 
Importantly, the Budget upholds our solemn obligation to take care of our servicemembers and veterans, and to protect our diplomats and civilians in the field. It keeps faith with our veterans, investing in world-class care, including mental health care for our wounded warriors, supporting our military families, and giving our veterans the benefits, education, and job opportunities that they have earned.
 
The Budget does all of these things as part of a comprehensive plan that reduces the deficit. All of these initiatives and ideas are fully paid for, to ensure they do not increase the deficit by a single dime. By making investments in our people that we pay for responsibly, we will strengthen the middle class, make America a magnet for jobs and innovation, and grow our economy, which will in turn help us to reduce deficits. But economic growth alone will not solve our Nation’s long-term fiscal challenges.
 
As we continue to grow our economy, we must take further action to cut our deficits. We do not have to choose between these two important priorities—we have to do both.
 
Over the last 4 years, both parties have worked together to reduce the deficit in a balanced way by more than $2.5 trillion. That is more than halfway toward the goal of $4 trillion in deficit reduction that economists say we need to stabilize our finances. As we wind down two wars, we have protected our military families and veterans while cutting defense spending on outdated military weapons systems. Domestic discretionary spending is approaching its lowest levels as a share of the economy since President Eisenhower was in office; and we have moved aggressively to cut waste, fraud, and abuse. And together, we have begun to ask the wealthy to do their fair share while keeping income taxes low for middle class families. Overall, we have cut the deficit in a balanced way that protects the investments in education, manufacturing, clean energy, and small businesses we need to grow the economy and strengthen the middle class. There is more work to do, and this Budget is designed to finish the job.
 
But we should not do it by making harsh and arbitrary cuts that jeopardize our military readiness, devastate priorities like education and energy, and cost jobs. That is not how to grow the economy. We should not ask middle class senior citizens and working families to pay down the rest of our deficit while the wealthiest are asked for nothing more. That does not grow our middle class.
 
The American people understand that we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. That is why I have repeatedly called for a balanced approach to deficit reduction. And that is why I have offered proposals on multiple occasions that cut wasteful spending, strengthen entitlements, and eliminate special tax breaks and loopholes so the wealthiest pay their fair share.
 
In my negotiations with House Speaker Boehner in December over the so-called “fiscal cliff,” I again offered a compromise proposal that was balanced and comprehensive, and would achieve our $4 trillion deficit reduction goal. That proposal is still on the table. I am including it in this Budget to demonstrate my commitment to making the kind of tough and balanced choices that are needed to put our Nation’s finances in order.
 
To be clear, the package I am offering includes some difficult cuts that I do not particularly like. But these measures will only become law if congressional Republicans agree to meet me in the middle by eliminating special tax breaks and loopholes so millionaires and billionaires do their fair share to cut the deficit. I will not agree to any deal that seeks to cut the deficit on the backs of middle class families. I am willing to make tough choices that may not be popular within my own party, because there can be no sacred cows for either party. And I look forward to working with any member of Congress who takes a similar, balanced approach. This plan is built on the kind of common ground that Democrats and Republicans should be able to reach.
 
In total, the Budget will cut the deficit by another $1.8 trillion over the next 10 years, bringing the deficit below 2 percent of GDP by 2023 and putting our debt on a declining path. This is not an end in and of itself—the best way to grow the economy and cut the deficit is by creating good middle class jobs. But this plan to reduce the deficit in a balanced way is a critical step toward ensuring that we have a solid foundation on which to build a strong economy and a thriving middle class for years to come.
 
Finally, this Budget continues my commitment to reforming and streamlining our Government for the 21st Century. It builds on my Campaign to Cut Waste by further targeting and eliminating wasteful spending wherever we find it. It reorganizes and consolidates agencies and programs to make them leaner and more efficient. It increases the use of evidence and evaluation to ensure we are making smart investments with our scarce taxpayer dollars. And it harnesses new technologies to allow us to do more with less.
 
No single Budget can solve every challenge and every problem facing the country. But this Budget shows how we can live within our means while growing our economy, strengthening the middle class, and securing our Nation’s future. It is not a Democratic plan or a Republican plan. It is an American plan. And it is a plan that I hope can serve as an outline for us to write the next great chapter of the American story…together.
 
Barack Obama
The White House,
April 10, 2013.

Mid-Session Review

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/MSR

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/budget/fy2014/assets/14msr.pdf (PDF)

The FY2014 Mid-Session Review contains revised estimates of budget receipts, outlays, and budget authority for fiscal years 2013 through 2023 and other summary information. 

Supporting Documents

Size

File Format

FY 2014 Mid-Session Review 1130 K PDF

Transmittal Letter

July 8, 2013
The Honorable John A. Boehner
Speaker of the House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20510
 
Dear Mr. Speaker:
 
Section 1106 of Title 31, United States Code, requests that the President send to the Congress a supplemental update of the Budget that was transmitted to the Congress earlier in the year. This enclosed supplemental update of the Budget, commonly known as the Mid-Session Review, contains revised estimates of receipts, outlays, budget authority, and the budget deficit for fiscal years 2013 through 2023.
 
Sincerely,
Sylvia M. Burwell
Director
Enclosure
Identical Letter Sent to the President of the Senate
 

List of Tables

Table 1. Changes in Deficits from the 2014 Budget
Table 2. Economic Assumptions
Table 3. Comparison of Economic Assumptions
Table 4. Change in Receipts
Table 5. Change in Outlays
Table S–1. Budget Totals
Table S–2. Effect of Budget Proposals on Projected Deficits
Table S–3. Cumulative Deficit Reduction
Table S–4. Adjusted Baseline by Category
Table S–5. Proposed Budget by Category
Table S–6. Proposed Budget by Category as a Percent of GDP
Table S–7. Bridge From Balanced Budget and Emergency Control Act (BBEDCA) Baseline to Adjusted Baseline
Table S–8. Mandatory and Receipt Proposals
Table S–9. Funding Levels for Appropriated (“Discretionary”) Programs by Category
Table S–10. Funding Levels for Appropriated (“Discretionary”) Programs by Agency
Table S–11. Federal Government Financing and Debt

Summary

This Mid-Session Review (MSR) updates the Administration’s estimates for outlays, receipts, and the deficit for economic, legislative, and other changes that have occurred since the release of the President’s 2014 Budget. The 2013 deficit is now projected to be $759 billion, $214 billion lower than the $973 billion deficit projected in the Budget. As a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP), the 2013 deficit is now projected to equal 4.7 percent, down from the 6.0 percent projected in the Budget. Going forward, the MSR estimates that the deficit will fall to below 3 percent of GDP by 2017 and to about 2 percent of GDP by 2023. The MSR also shows that the Budget achieves the core goal of fiscal sustainability by putting Federal debt on a declining path as a share of the economy.

Strengthening the Economic Recovery

The President believes our top priority must be strengthening the true engine of economic growth—a rising and thriving middle class. He will continue to pursue policies to accelerate the recovery, speed job creation, and expand the middle class. The 2014 Budget demonstrates that we do not need to choose between making critical investments necessary to help grow our economy and support middle class families and continuing to cut the deficit in a balanced way. The Budget shows how we can do both. It offers concrete strategies to address three fundamental questions: How do we attract more jobs to our shores? How do we equip our people with the skills needed to do the jobs of the 21st Century? How do we make sure hard work leads to a decent living?
 
To once again make America a magnet for jobs, the Budget invests in high-tech manufacturing and innovation, clean energy, and infrastructure, while cutting red tape to help businesses grow. To give workers the skills they need to compete in the global economy, it invests in education and job training, and sets forth a visionary proposal to ensure every four-year-old has access to high quality pre-school. To ensure hard work is rewarded, it builds ladders of opportunity to help every American and every community. By identifying offsets for each of these initiatives, the Budget invests in the potential of the middle class and our economy while keeping us on a fiscally disciplined long-term path.
 
While more work remains to be done, the U.S. economy has made significant progress in recovering from the worst downturn since the Great Depression. When the President took office in 2009, the private sector was losing over 800,000 jobs a month, credit markets that provide capital for investment had seized up, and businesses—small and large—were struggling. The housing market was in free fall and our auto industry was near collapse.
 
Through the determination and resiliency of the American people and the decisive actions of the President working with Congress to bolster job growth and jumpstart economic activity, we successfully broke the back of the recession and pulled the Nation back from the brink. The economy has been recovering ever since. We have seen positive economic growth for 15 consecutive quarters. Through June, the private sector has added jobs every month for 40 straight months, with a total of 7.2 million jobs added over that period. This year alone, more than 1.2 million private sector jobs have been added so far. The unemployment rate has fallen from a high of 10 percent in 2009 to 7.6 percent as of June. Manufacturers have added more than 500,000 jobs over the past three years. And the housing market and the auto industry continue to show signs of recovery.
 
But while the economy is adding jobs, too many Americans are still unemployed and have been looking for work for too long. Businesses are hiring again, but too many are still struggling to compete and find workers with the right skills to meet their needs. Home prices are rising at the fastest pace in seven years and construction is expanding, but too many families with solid credit are still finding it difficult to buy a home or refinance. And although corporate profits have climbed to all-time highs, wages and incomes for America’s middle class have continued to stagnate.
 
By making investments in our people and infrastructure, we can strengthen the middle class, make America a magnet for jobs and innovation, and grow our economy. But economic growth alone will not solve our Nation’s long-term fiscal challenges. That is why the President is committed to continuing to reduce the deficit in a balanced way.

The Role of Deficit Reduction in Promoting Sustained Economic Growth and Job Creation

Over the past few years, we have experienced the fastest period of deficit reduction since the years immediately following World War II. The President and the Congress have achieved over $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction by cutting spending by more than $1.4 trillion, achieving more than $600 billion in new revenue from raising tax rates on the wealthiest Americans, and realizing interest savings. As a Nation we are more than halfway toward the goal of $4 trillion in deficit reduction that bipartisan, independent experts have identified as necessary to bring deficits below 3 percent of GDP, put our debt on a downward trajectory, and put us on a fiscally sustainable path.
 
The President’s Budget includes a compromise plan to achieve that goal while demonstrating that we do not need to choose between economic growth and fiscal discipline. The President’s compromise proposal combines additional spending cuts, entitlement reforms, and revenue from tax reform to achieve nearly $1.8 trillion in additional deficit reduction over the next 10 years, bringing total deficit reduction to more than $4.3 trillion.
 
We are already making progress down this path to further deficit reduction. Under the revised estimates in the MSR, the current year deficit has fallen by $214 billion compared to the projections in the Budget, and deficits will continue to fall to below 3 percent of GDP in 2017. In addition, the MSR shows that the Federal debt will begin to decline as a share of the economy in 2016. Over the next 10 years, deficits fall to about 2 percent of GDP, and debt continues to decline every year after 2015. Putting our budget on a sustainable fiscal path is a critical step toward ensuring that we have a solid foundation on which to build a strong economy and a thriving middle class for years to come.
 
In addition to the policies explicitly reflected in the MSR, the President has outlined a plan for commonsense immigration reform and called on Congress to enact legislation that would strengthen our borders; crack down on employers who exploit American and immigrant workers; streamline the legal immigration system to attract highly-skilled entrepreneurs and engineers to help create jobs, drive economic growth, and reunite Americans with their families; and establish a responsible pathway to earned citizenship. In June, the Senate passed, with a strongly bipartisan vote, a bill that would achieve these goals and also make a substantial contribution to reducing the deficit. The Congressional Budget Office estimated the effect of the Senate immigration bill, using its own economic and technical assumptions, and found that the bill would reduce Federal deficits by $158 billion over the first decade and by about $700 billion in the second decade. In addition, according to the independent Social Security Office of the Chief Actuary, the bipartisan Senate-passed immigration reform bill would strengthen Social Security over the long-term, ensuring full Social Security solvency until 2035—two years longer than if we fail to act on immigration—and reducing Social Security unfunded liabilities by half a trillion dollars through 2087.

Replacing Sequestration With Balanced Deficit Reduction, While Investing in the Middle Class and America's Future

The 2014 Budget presents a strategy to grow the economy in both the short and long term. To ensure America remains competitive in the 21st Century, it invests in American innovation, reviving our manufacturing base and keeping our Nation at the forefront of technological advancement. For example, it invests in 15 manufacturing innovation institutes across the country, transforming regions into global epicenters of advanced manufacturing. To ensure our energy security and combat global climate change, it advances the President’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, focusing on energy production, the development of clean energy alternatives, and the promotion of energy efficiency efforts in both the public and private sectors. To build a foundation for growth and competitiveness and create jobs now, it invests in repairing our existing infrastructure and building the infrastructure of tomorrow, including high-speed rail, high-tech schools, and power grids that are resilient to future extreme conditions. And to ensure hard work leads to a decent living, it creates new ladders of opportunity by expanding childhood education, supporting communities as they rebuild from the Great Recession, creating pathways to work for the long-term unemployed and youth, and raising the minimum wage to $9 an hour so a hard day’s work pays more.
 
Importantly, the 2014 Budget also supports economic growth by including more than enough deficit reduction to replace sequestration and the deep discretionary funding cuts triggered by the failure of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (the “Joint Committee”) to reach an agreement. With the recovery gaining traction, we need to focus on ways to protect and accelerate economic growth, not hold it back. The Budget demonstrates that we can replace these economically-damaging cuts with smart, targeted efforts to cut wasteful spending, strengthen entitlements, and eliminate loopholes through tax reform, while at the same time making critical investments to grow the economy, create jobs, and strengthen the middle class.
 
In the Budget Control Act (BCA), the Congress agreed on tight caps for discretionary spending that will allow for the critical investments we need to grow the economy while saving more than a trillion dollars over the next 10 years and bringing domestic discretionary spending to its lowest level as a share of the economy since the Eisenhower Administration. The BCA also established the Joint Committee to provide Congress with an opportunity to reach bipartisan agreement on achieving an additional $1.2 trillion in balanced deficit reduction over 10 years. The law included the threat of sequestration as a mechanism to force Congress to act. The specter of harmful across-the-board cuts to defense and non-defense programs was intended to drive both sides to compromise; sequestration itself was never intended to be implemented. However, Congress’s failure to act on an alternative deficit reduction plan led the scheduled cuts to begin taking effect in March.
 
Sequestration is already having negative impacts on the country and the American people. Although the economy has continued to grow and job creation has held steady, we could be experiencing even stronger growth and job creation were it not for sequestration. The CBO estimated that sequestration will reduce the Nation’s economic growth by more than half a percentage point and cost 750,000 jobs in 2013. Other independent economic forecasters have reached similar conclusions. The negative effects of sequestration are already being felt in areas ranging from reduced Army and Air Force training programs to cuts in National Institute of Health research to cuts at Head Start centers. Moreover, these
impacts will build over time.
 
If allowed to continue, sequestration will further harm the economy and undermine the middle class. Congress can and should take action to replace it by passing a comprehensive and balanced deficit reduction package. Unfortunately, Congressional Republicans, primarily in the House of Representatives, have been unwilling to accept any plan to replace sequestration that includes new revenue. Instead, the Republican House has proposed to shift funding to defense accounts by imposing even deeper cuts in areas such as education, innovation and infrastructure.
 
Bipartisan and independent groups that have examined the Nation’s fiscal outlook have concluded that the best way forward is a balanced plan that phases in deficit reduction to avoid harming the economic recovery, raises new revenue from tax reform that will also improve U.S. competitiveness, includes entitlement reform that takes further steps to address rising health care costs while providing protections for the most vulnerable, and maintains investments in education, innovation, and infrastructure. That is the right path forward, and it is the approach the President has proposed in his 2014 Budget.

The Budget

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Overview

Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2014 contains the Budget Message of the President, information on the President’s priorities, budget overviews organized by agency, and summary tables.

To download "Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2014" as a single PDF click here (244 pages, 2.2 MB) (PDF)

Document

Size

File Format

Descriptions of The Budget Documents and General Notes 67 K PDF
The Budget Message of the President 47 K PDF
Strengthening the Middle Class and Making America a Magnet for Jobs 167 K PDF
Reducing the Deficit in a Smart and Balanced Way 90 K PDF
Creating a 21st Century Government 90 K PDF
Department of Agriculture 146 K PDF
Department of Commerce 89 K PDF
Department of Defense 133 K PDF
National Intelligence Program 53 K PDF
Department of Education 124 K PDF
Department of Energy 137 K PDF
Department of Health and Human Services 120 K PDF
Department of Homeland Security 104 K PDF
Department of the Interior 121 K PDF
Department of Housing and Urban Development 67 K PDF
Department of Justice 195 K PDF
Department of Labor 120 K PDF
Department of State and Other International Programs 126 K PDF
Department of Transportation 59 K PDF
Department of the Treasury 77 K PDF
Department of Veterans Affairs 98 K PDF
Corps of Engineers – Civil Works 184 K PDF
Environmental Protection Agency 66 K PDF
National Aeronautics and Space Administration 65 K PDF
National Science Foundation 75 K PDF
Small Business Administration 69 K PDF
Social Security Administration 120 K PDF
Corporation for National Community Service 48 K PDF
Cuts, Consolidations, and Savings 96 K PDF
Summary Tables 254 K PDF

Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Overview

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/overview

The President’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget demonstrates that we can make critical investments to strengthen the middle class, create jobs, and grow the economy while continuing to cut the deficit in a balanced way.

The President believes we must invest in the true engine of America’s economic growth – a rising and thriving middle class.  He is focused on addressing three fundamental questions: How do we attract more jobs to our shores?  How do we equip our people with the skills needed to do the jobs of the 21st Century? How do we make sure hard work leads to a decent living?  The Budget presents the President’s plan to address each of these questions.

To make America once again a magnet for jobs, the Budget invests in high-tech manufacturing and innovation, clean energy, and infrastructure, while cutting red tape to help businesses grow.  To give workers the skills they need to compete in the global economy, it invests in education from pre-school to job training.  To ensure hard work is rewarded, it raises the minimum wage to $9 an hour so a hard day’s work pays more. 

The Budget does all of these things as part of a comprehensive plan that reduces the deficit and puts the Nation on a sound fiscal course.  Every new initiative in the plan is fully paid for, so they do not add a single dime to the deficit.  The Budget also incorporates the President’s compromise offer to House Speaker Boehner to achieve another $1.8 trillion in deficit reduction in a balanced way.  When combined with the deficit reduction already achieved, this will allow us to exceed the goal of $4 trillion in deficit reduction, while growing the economy and strengthening the middle class.  By including this compromise proposal in the Budget, the President is demonstrating his willingness to make tough choices and his seriousness about finding common ground to further reduce the deficit. 

Key Budget Facts

  • Creates jobs by responsibly paying for investments in education, manufacturing, clean energy, infrastructure, and small business.
     
  • Includes $1.8 trillion of additional deficit reduction over 10 years, bringing total deficit reduction achieved to $4.3 trillion.
     
  • Represents more than $2 in spending cuts for every $1 of new revenue from closing tax loopholes and reducing tax benefits for the wealthiest.
     
  • Deficit is reduced to 2.8% of GDP by 2016 and 1.7% by 2023 with debt declining as a share of the economy, while protecting the investments we need to create jobs and strengthen the middle class.
     
  • Includes $400 billion in health savings that crack down on waste and fraud to strengthen Medicare for years to come.

Making America a Magnet for Jobs

To compete in the 21st Century economy and make America a magnet for jobs, the Budget invests in American innovation, reviving our manufacturing base and keeping our Nation at the forefront of technological advancement. And to ensure our energy security and combat climate change, it continues to focus on energy production, the development of clean energy alternatives, and the promotion of energy efficiency efforts in both the public and private sectors.  

  • Transforms regions across the country into global epicenters of advanced manufacturing with a one-time, $1 billion investment to launch a network of up to 15 manufacturing innovation institutes.
     
  • Maintains our world-leading commitment to science and research by increasing nondefense research and development (R&D) investment by 9% above the 2012 levels.
     
  • Continues President’s “all-of-the-above” strategy on energy – investing in clean energy R&D, promoting the safe production of natural gas, encouraging States to cut energy waste with a Race-to-the-Top challenge to cut energy waste and modernize the grid, creating an Energy Security Trust to fund research efforts that would help shift cars and trucks off oil, and making permanent the tax credit for renewable energy production.
     
  • Enhances preparedness and resilience to climate change, safeguarding communities and Federal investments, while strengthening efforts to reduce carbon pollution domestically and internationally.

Building a 21st Century Infrastructure

The Budget invests in repairing our existing infrastructure and building the infrastructure of tomorrow, including high-speed rail, high-tech schools, and power grids that are resilient to future extreme conditions.  These investments will both lay the foundation for long-term economic growth and put workers back on the job now. 

  • Provides $50 billion for upfront infrastructure investments, including $40 billion for “Fix it First” projects, to invest immediately in repairing highways, bridges, transit systems, and airports nationwide; and $10 billion for competitive programs to encourage innovation in completing high-value infrastructure projects.
     
  • Boosts private investment in infrastructure by creating a Rebuild America Partnership.
    • Establishes an independent National Infrastructure Bank to leverage private and public capital to support infrastructure projects of national and regional significance. 
    • Creates America Fast Forward (AFF) Bonds, building on the successful Build America Bonds program to attract new sources of capital for infrastructure investment.
       
  • Dedicates funding for the development of high-speed rail to link communities across the country, the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NexGen) to improve air travel and safety, and a robust long term increase in levels for core highways, transit, and highway safety programs. 
     
  • Expedites infrastructure projects by modernizing the Federal permitting process to cut through red tape while creating incentives and better outcomes for communities and the environment.  Establishes a new goal of cutting timelines in half for major infrastructure projects in areas such as highways, bridges, railways, ports, waterways, pipelines, and renewable energy.

Equipping Americans with the Skills They Need

To equip our workers with the skills they need to fill the jobs of the 21st Century economy, the Budget includes investments and reforms in education and training.  It makes a major new commitment to early childhood education; sustains investments in K-12 schools, while ramping up innovation; redoubles our focus on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education to prepare our students for the jobs of tomorrow; and includes new initiatives to make college more affordable.

  • To build a foundation for success in the formative early years of life, increases access to high-quality early childhood education with a Preschool for All initiative.
    • In partnership with the States, provides all low- and moderate-income four-year-olds with high-quality preschool, while encouraging States to serve additional four-year-olds from middle class families. The initiative also promotes access to full-day kindergarten and high-quality early education programs for children under age four.
    • The Preschool for All initiative is financed by raising the Federal tax on cigarettes and other tobacco products, which would also have substantial public health impacts, particularly by reducing youth smoking.
    • The Budget makes companion investments in voluntary home visiting programs, preserving child care access, and expanding high-quality care for infants and toddlers through new Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships. 
       
  • Creates a new, competitive fund for redesigning high schools to focus on providing challenging and relevant experiences, while promoting and developing partnerships with colleges and employers that improve instruction and prepare students to continue education or transition into skilled jobs.
     
  • Strengthens and reforms career and technical education to better align programs with the needs of employers and higher education to ensure that graduates are poised to succeed.
     
  • Prepares students for careers in STEM-related fields by reorganizing and restructuring Federal STEM education programs to make better use of resources and improve outcomes; and invests in recruiting and preparing 100,000 STEM teachers and creating a new STEM Master Teachers Corps to improve STEM instruction. 
     
  • Improves college affordability and value with a continued commitment to Pell Grants; budget-neutral student loan reforms that will make interest rates more market-based; a $1 billion Race-to-the-Top fund to support competitive grants to States that drive higher education reform, while doing more to contain tuition; a $260 million First in the World fund to spur cutting-edge innovations that decrease college costs and boost graduation rates; and reforms to Federal campus-based aid to reward colleges that set responsible tuition policy, provide  a high-quality education and better serve students with financial need.
     
  • Improves services for workers and job seekers by revisiting the structure of the Federal job training system, including through the creation of a Universal Displaced Worker program; drives innovation through the Workforce Innovation Fund by testing new State and regional ideas to better deliver training and employment services; and provides $8 billion for a Community College to Career Fund to support State and community college partnerships with businesses and other stakeholders.

Making the Tax Code More Simple and Fair

The President believes that today’s tax code has become overly complex and inequitable and that we should immediately begin the process of reforming the individual and business tax systems. As a down payment on comprehensive tax reform, the Budget offers detailed proposals to broaden the tax base, close tax loopholes, and establish a Buffett Rule that will prevent millionaires from taking advantage of special provisions to pay taxes at lower rates than many middle-class families do.

  • Raises $580 billion for deficit reduction by limiting high-income tax benefits, without raising tax rates.
    • Implements the Buffett Rule, requiring that households with incomes over $1 million pay at least 30% of their income (after charitable giving) in taxes.
    • Limits the value of tax deductions and other tax benefits for the top 2% of families to 28%, reducing these tax benefits to levels closer to what middle-class families get.
       
  • Provides new tax cuts to encourage hiring and wage increases and to support middle-class families.
    • Provides a 10% tax credit for small businesses that hire new employees or increase wages.
    • Provides a new tax credit to encourage employers to offer retirement savings plans and expands a tax credit that helps middle-class families afford child care.
    • Makes permanent the American Opportunity Tax Credit, which currently helps about 11 million students and families afford college, as well as improvements to the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit that help millions of working families with children make ends meet.
       
  • Pays for middle-class tax relief by eliminating tax loopholes that benefit the wealthy and special interests.
    • Ends a loophole that lets wealthy individuals circumvent contribution limits and accumulate millions in tax-preferred retirement accounts.
    • Ends a loophole that lets financial managers pay tax on their carried interest income at the lower capital gains rate.
       
  • Eliminates business tax loopholes while providing incentives for research, manufacturing, and clean energy and cutting taxes for small businesses.
    • Reforms and makes permanent important tax incentives for research and development, renewable energy, and energy efficiency.
    • Cuts taxes for small businesses by letting them claim tax write-offs for up to $500,000 of new investment.
    • Eliminates loopholes such as oil and gas tax breaks and special tax rules for corporate jets.
    • Proposes reforms to prevent companies from shifting profits overseas to avoid U.S. taxes and to encourage “insourcing” and job creation here in the United States. 

Ensuring Hard Work Leads to a Decent Living

The Budget builds on the progress made over the last four years to expand opportunity for every American and every community willing to do the work to lift themselves up.  It creates new ladders of opportunity to ensure that hard work leads to a decent living.  It expands early childhood education to give children a foundation for lifelong learning.  It supports a partnership with communities to help them thrive and rebuild from the Great Recession.  It creates pathways to jobs for the long-term unemployed and youth who have been hard hit.  It rewards hard work by increasing the minimum wage so a hard day’s work pays more.  And it strengthens families by removing financial deterrents to marriage and supporting the role of fathers.

  • Creates Promise Zones to rebuild high-poverty communities across the country by attracting private investment to build new housing, improving educational opportunities, providing tax incentives for hiring workers and investing within the Zones, reducing violence and assisting local leaders in navigating Federal programs and cutting through red tape.
     
  • Creates a Pathways Back to Work fund to support summer and year round jobs for low-income youth, subsidized employment opportunities for unemployed and low-income adults, and other promising strategies designed to lead to employment.
     
  • Supports the President’s call to reward hard work by raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour.
     
  • Strengthens families by allowing Federal programs like the child support program to implement models that get more men working and engaging with their children, and by addressing financial deterrents to marriage.

Cutting the Deficit in a Balanced Way

The President is committed to continuing to reduce the deficit in a balanced way. He is determined to do this in a way that replaces the economically damaging across-the-board cuts of sequestration with smart, targeted efforts to cut wasteful spending, strengthen entitlements, and eliminate loopholes for the wealthiest through tax reform.

The President stands by the compromise offer he made to Speaker Boehner during “fiscal cliff” negotiations in December 2012.  The Budget includes all of the proposals in that offer, which would achieve $1.8 trillion in additional deficit reduction over the next 10 years, bringing total deficit reduction to $4.3 trillion. This represents more than enough deficit reduction to replace the cuts required by the Joint Committee sequestration.  By including this compromise proposal in the Budget, the President is demonstrating his willingness to make tough choices to find common ground to further reduce the deficit.  This offer includes some difficult cuts that the President would not propose on their own, such as an adjustment to inflation indexing requested by Republicans.  But there can be no sacred cows for either party. The key elements of the offer include:

  • $580 billion in additional revenue relative to the end-of-year tax deal, from tax reform that closes tax loopholes and reduces tax benefits for those who need them least; 
     
  • $400 billion in health savings that build on the health reform law and strengthen Medicare;
     
  • $200 billion in savings from other mandatory programs, such as reductions to farm subsidies and reforms to federal retirement benefits;
     
  • $200 billion in additional discretionary savings, with equal amounts from defense and nondefense programs;
     
  • $230 billion in savings from using a chained measure of inflation for cost-of-living adjustments throughout the Budget, with protections for the most vulnerable;
     
  • $210 billion in savings from reduced interest payments on the debt; and
     
  • $50 billion for immediate infrastructure investments, as noted earlier, to repair our roads and transit systems, create jobs, and build a foundation for economic growth.  

In addition, the Budget includes a series of new proposals to root out waste and reform and streamline government for the 21st Century.  In total, it includes 215 cuts, consolidations, and savings proposals, which are projected to save more than $25 billion in 2014.

Analytical Perspectives

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Analytical_Perspectives

My Note: This document should be in MindTouch (508 pages) and see 3 Excel files below.

Analytical Perspectives, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2014 contains analyses that are designed to highlight specified subject areas or provide other significant presentations of budget data that place the budget in perspective. This volume includes economic and accounting analyses; information on Federal receipts and collections; analyses of Federal spending; information on Federal borrowing and debt; baseline or current services estimates; and other technical presentations.

The Analytical Perspectives volume also contains supplemental material with several detailed tables, including tables showing the budget by agency and account and by function, subfunction, and program, that is available on the Internet and as a CD-ROM in the printed document.

To download the Analytical Perspectives as a single PDF, click here (508 pages, 4.0 MB) (PDF)

By Section

Size

File Format

List of Charts and Tables 297 K PDF
Introduction 67 K PDF
Economic and Budget Analyses 958 K PDF
Performance and Management 425 K PDF
Budget Concepts and Budget Process 394 K PDF
Federal Receipts 774 K PDF
Special Topics 1146 K PDF
Technical Budget Analyses 751 K PDF

 

Supplemental Materials

Size

File Format

Table 22-11. Direct Loan Transactions of the Federal Government 185 K PDF
Table 22-12. Guaranteed Loan Transactions of the Federal Government 113 K PDF
Appendix--Homeland Security Mission Funding by Agency and Budget Account 145 K PDF
Bay-Delta Federal Agency Funding-- Summary Category and Agency Breakout 30 K PDF
Bay-Delta Project Descriptions 288 K PDF
Bay-Delta Year by Year Funding 38 K PDF
Table 26-13. Current Services Budget Authority and Outlays by Function, Category, and Program  322 K PDF
Table 31-1. Budget Authority and Outlays by Function, Category, and Program 438 K PDF
Table 32-1. Federal Programs by Agency and Account 1845 K PDF

 

Spreadsheets of Select Tables

Size

File Format

Table 17-1. Federal Grants to State and Local Governments - Budget Authority and Outlays 85 K XLS (Excel)
Table 26-13. Current Services Budget Authority and Outlays by Function, Category, and Program 373 K XLS (Excel)
Table 31-1. Budget Authority and Outlays by Function, Category, and Program 477 K XLS (Excel)

Historical Tables

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Historicals

My Note: I analyzed these tables in the Budget of the United States Government Fiscal Year 2013

See Excel file below that needs minor edits to the column names to work in Spotfire.

Historical Tables provides data on budget receipts, outlays, surpluses or deficits, Federal debt, and Federal employment over an extended time period, generally from 1940 or earlier to 2014 or 2018.

To the extent feasible, the data have been adjusted to provide consistency with the 2014 Budget and to provide comparability over time.

To download the Historical Tables as a single PDF, click here (376 pages, 3.2 MB)

Spreadsheets

To download all Historical Tables in XLS format as a single ZIP file, click here (788 KB)

 

Document

Size

File Format

Table 1.1—Summary of Receipts, Outlays, and Surpluses or Deficits (-): 1789–2018 38 K XLS
Table 1.2—Summary of Receipts, Outlays, and Surpluses or Deficits (-) as Percentages of GDP: 1930–2018 37 K XLS (Excel)
Table 1.3—Summary of Receipts, Outlays, and Surpluses or Deficits (-) in Current Dollars, Constant (FY 2005) Dollars, and as Percentages of GDP: 1940–2018 37 K XLS
Table 1.4—Receipts, Outlays, and Surpluses or Deficits (-) by Fund Group: 1934–2018 34 K XLS
     
Table 2.1—Receipts by Source: 1934–2018 34 K XLS
Table 2.2—Percentage Composition of Receipts by Source: 1934–2018 36 K XLS
Table 2.3—Receipts by Source as Percentages of GDP: 1934–2018 36 K XLS
Table 2.4—Composition of Social Insurance and Retirement Receipts and of Excise Taxes: 1940–2018 62 K XLS
Table 2.5—Composition of "Other Receipts": 1940–2018 36 K XLS
     
Table 3.1—Outlays by Superfunction and Function: 1940–2018 59 K XLS
Table 3.2—Outlays by Function and Subfunction: 1962–2018 84 K XLS
     
Table 4.1—Outlays by Agency: 1962–2018 40 K XLS
Table 4.2—Percentage Distribution of Outlays by Agency: 1962–2018 44 K XLS
     
Table 5.1—Budget Authority by Function and Subfunction: 1976–2018 72 K XLS
Table 5.2—Budget Authority by Agency: 1976–2018 36 K XLS
Table 5.3—Percentage Distribution of Budget Authority by Agency: 1976–2018 40 K XLS
Table 5.4—Discretionary Budget Authority by Agency: 1976–2018 36 K XLS
Table 5.5—Percentage Distribution of Discretionary Budget Authority by Agency: 1976–2018 39 K XLS
Table 5.6—Budget Authority for Discretionary Programs: 1976–2018 37 K XLS
     
Table 6.1—Composition of Outlays: 1940–2018 55 K XLS
     
Table 7.1—Federal Debt at the End of Year: 1940–2018 35 K XLS
Table 7.2—Debt Subject to Statutory Limit: 1940–2018 26 K XLS
Table 7.3—Statutory Limits on Federal Debt: 1940–Current 43 K XLS
     
Table 8.1—Outlays by Budget Enforcement Act Category: 1962–2018 35 K XLS
Table 8.2—Outlays by Budget Enforcement Act Category in Constant (FY 2005) Dollars: 1962–2018 35 K XLS
Table 8.3—Percentage Distribution of Outlays by Budget Enforcement Act Category: 1962–2018 35 K XLS
Table 8.4—Outlays by Budget Enforcement Act Category as Percentages of GDP: 1962–2018 36 K XLS
Table 8.5—Outlays for Mandatory and Related Programs: 1962–2018 48 K XLS
Table 8.6—Outlays for Mandatory and Related Programs in Constant (FY 2005) Dollars: 1962–2018 54 K XLS
Table 8.7—Outlays for Discretionary Programs: 1962–2018 40 K XLS
Table 8.8—Outlays for Discretionary Programs in Constant (FY 2005) Dollars: 1962–2018 44 K XLS
     
Table 9.1—Total Investment Outlays for Physical Capital, Research and Development, and Education and Training: 1962–2014 32 K XLS
Table 9.2—Major Public Physical Capital Investment Outlays in Current and Constant (FY 2005) Dollars: 1940–2014 34 K XLS
Table 9.3—Major Public Physical Capital Investment Outlays in Percentage Terms: 1940–2014 34 K XLS
Table 9.4—National Defense Outlays for Major Public Direct Physical Capital Investment: 1940–2014 32 K XLS
Table 9.5—Nondefense Outlays for Major Public Direct Physical Capital Investment: 1940–2014 34 K XLS
Table 9.6—Composition of Outlays for Grants for Major Public Physical Capital Investment: 1941–2014 42 K XLS
Table 9.7—Summary of Outlays for the Conduct of Research and Development: 1949–2014 (In Current Dollars, as Percentages of Total Outlays, as Percentages of GDP, and in Constant (FY 2005) Dollars) 33 K XLS
Table 9.8—Composition of Outlays for the Conduct of Research and Development: 1949–2014 37 K XLS
Table 9.9—Composition of Outlays for the Conduct of Education and Training: 1962–2014 32 K XLS
     
Table 10.1—Gross Domestic Product and Deflators Used in the Historical Tables: 1940–2018 49 K XLS
     
Table 11.1—Summary Comparison of Outlays for Payments for Individuals: 1940–2018 (In Current Dollars, as Percentages of Total Outlays, as Percentages of GDP, and in Constant (FY 2005) Dollars) 36 K XLS
Table 11.2—Functional Composition of Outlays for Payments for Individuals: 1940–2018 63 K XLS
Table 11.3—Outlays for Payments for Individuals by Category and Major Program: 1940–2018 187 K XLS
     
Table 12.1—Summary Comparison of Total Outlays for Grants to State and Local Governments: 1940–2018 (in Current Dollars, as Percentages of Total Outlays, as Percentages of GDP, and in Constant (FY 2005) Dollars) 38 K XLS
Table 12.2—Total Outlays for Grants to State and Local Governments, by Function and Fund Group: 1940–2018 45 K XLS
Table 12.3—Total Outlays for Grants to State and Local Governments, by Function, Agency, and Program: 1940–2014 460 K XLS
     
Table 13.1—Cash Income, Outgo, and Balances of the Social Security and Medicare Trust Funds: 1936–2018 107 K XLS
     
Table 14.1—Federal Transactions in the National Income and Product Accounts for Federal Fiscal Years: 1948–2014 51 K XLS
Table 14.2—Federal Transactions in the National Income and Product Accounts as Percentages of GDP for Federal Fiscal Years: 1948–2014 51 K XLS
     
Table 15.1—Total Government Receipts in Absolute Amounts and as Percentages of GDP: 1948–2012 34 K XLS
Table 15.2—Total Government Expenditures: 1948–2012 31 K XLS
Table 15.3—Total Government Expenditures as Percentages of GDP: 1948–2012 31 K XLS
Table 15.4—Total Government Expenditures by Major Category of Expenditure: 1948–2012 31 K XLS
Table 15.5—Total Government Expenditures by Major Category of Expenditure as Percentages of GDP: 1948–2012 31 K XLS
Table 15.6—Total Government Surpluses or Deficits (-) in Absolute Amounts and as Percentages of GDP: 1948–2012 33 K XLS
     
Table 16.1—Total Outlays for Health Programs: 1962–2018 36 K XLS
     
Table 17.1—Total Executive Branch Civilian Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Employees, 1981–2014 29 K XLS
Table 17.2—Total Executive Branch Civilian Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Employees, 1981–2014 as percentage of total 30 K XLS

Supplemental Materials

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Supplemental

My Note: More Excel files that I could use if the column headers are correct for Spotfire.

Supporting Documents

Size

File Format

Federal Credit Supplement 979 K PDF
Object Class Analysis 357 K PDF
Balances of Budget Authority 253 K PDF

Federal Credit Supplement Spreadsheets

Size

File Format

Direct Loans: Subsidy Rates, Obligations, and Average Loan Size 61 K XLS
Loan Guarantees: Subsidy Rates, Commitments, and Average Loan Size 56 K XLS
Direct Loans: Assumptions Underlying the FY 2013 Subsidy Estimates 67 K XLS
Loan Guarantees: Assumptions Underlying the FY 2013 Subsidy Estimates 69 K XLS
Direct Loans: Assumptions Underlying the FY 2014 Subsidy Estimates 63 K XLS
Loan Guarantees: Assumptions Underlying the FY 2014 Subsidy Estimates 66 K XLS
Direct Loans: Subsidy Reestimates 156 K XLS
Loan Guarantees: Subsidy Reestimates 134 K XLS
Direct Loan Program Disbursement Rate Assumptions Underlying the 2014 Subsidy Estimates 61 K XLS
Loan Guarantee Program Disbursement Rate Assumptions Underlying the 2014 Subsidy Estimates 61 K XLS

Tax Expenditures Spreadsheet

Size

File Format

Tables 16-1 to 16-4 450 K XLS

Size

File Format

User's Guide 57 K PDF
Budget Authority 2193 K XLS
  1612 K CSV
Outlays 2918 K XLS
  2055 K CSV
Receipts 177 K XLS
  109 K CSV

History of Economic Assumptions

Size

File Format

Economic Assumptions FY 1976 – FY 2014 567 K XLS

Long Range Budget Projections

Size

File Format

Long Range Budget Projections for the FY 2014 Budget 626 K XLS

Appendix

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/Appendix

My Note: Using (repurposing) these HTML files should be easier than using the PDF and XML.

The Appendix, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2014 contains detailed information on the various appropriations and funds that constitute the budget. The Appendix contains financial information on individual programs and appropriation accounts. It includes for each agency:

  • the proposed text of appropriations language
  • budget schedules for each account
  • legislative proposals
  • explanations of the work to be performed and the funds needed
  • proposed general provisions applicable to the appropriations of entire agencies or group of agencies

To download the Budget Appendix as a single PDF, click here (1381 pages, 12.1 MB)

To download the Budget Appendix DTD click here (36 KB)

To download the Budget Appendix XML files and DTD click here (5.6 MB)

To download the Budget Appendix HTML and CSS files, click here (3.1 MB)

Detailed Budget Estimates by Agency


Document

File
Format


Size

File
Format


Size

File
Format


Size

Explanation of Estimates PDF 110 K HTML 135 K XML 96 K
General Provisions Government-Wide PDF 80 K HTML 42 K XML 69 K
Legislative Branch PDF 392 K HTML 1073 K XML 635 K
Judicial Branch PDF 208 K HTML 463 K XML 251 K
Department of Agriculture PDF 1427 K HTML 5043 K XML 2705 K
Department of Commerce PDF 430 K HTML 1293 K XML 702 K
Department of Defense-Military PDF 1029 K HTML 3956 K XML 2074 K
Department of Education PDF 543 K HTML 1793 K XML 949 K
Department of Energy PDF 547 K HTML 1617 K XML 905 K
Department of Health and Human Services PDF 766 K HTML 2699 K XML 1452 K
Department of Homeland Security PDF 675 K HTML 2315 K XML 1272 K
Department of Housing and Urban Development PDF 679 K HTML 2057 K XML 1204 K
Department of the Interior PDF 1015 K HTML 3502 K XML 1939 K
Department of Justice PDF 539 K HTML 1595 K XML 904 K
Department of Labor PDF 493 K HTML 1375 K XML 797 K
Department of State and Other International Program  PDF 1030 K HTML 3393 K XML 1912 K
Department of Transportation PDF 847 K HTML 2814 K XML 1584 K
Department of the Treasury PDF 673 K HTML 2173 K XML 1243 K
Department of Veterans Affairs PDF 473 K HTML 1452 K XML 770 K
Corps of Engineers—Civil Works PDF 241 K HTML 578 K XML 307 K
Other Defense—Civil Programs PDF 181 K HTML 333 K XML 183 K
Environmental Protection Agency PDF 256 K HTML 556 K XML 328 K
Executive Office of the President PDF 195 K HTML 393 K XML 217 K
General Services Administration PDF 208 K HTML 459 K XML 254 K
National Aeronautics and Space Administration PDF 190 K HTML 398 K XML 215 K
National Science Foundation PDF 141 K HTML 209 K XML 112 K
Office of Personnel Management PDF 210 K HTML 419 K XML 232 K
Small Business Administration PDF 209 K HTML 500 K XML 256 K
Social Security Administration PDF 195 K HTML 427 K XML 237 K
Other Independent Agencies PDF 1318 K HTML 4616 K XML 2599 K

Other Materials

 


Document
   File
Format

Size
   File
Format

Size
   File
Format

Size
Amendments to and Revisions in Budget Authority for 2013 PDF 39 K HTML 20 K XML 11 K
Advance Appropriations PDF 73 K HTML 25 K XML 16 K
Financing Vehicles and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve  PDF 61 K HTML 45 K XML 26 K
Government-Sponsored Enterprises PDF 112 K HTML 146 K XML 83 K
Index PDF 231 K     XML 684 K
 

Supplementals, Amendments, and Releases

All of the documents on this page were created as PDFs
Click here for PDF assistance PDF Information

Occasionally there is need to modify the President's budget to recognize special circumstances that could not be foreseen when the President's budget was transmitted to Congress. Changes can only be requested by the President and these changes are called supplementals (for the current year) and amendments (for the next, or budget year). In addition, appropriations acts occasionally provide funds contingent upon the President taking further action to make them available (usually termed a "release").

FY 2013 and FY 2014 Supplementals, Amendments, and Releases

CLICK HERE TO VIEW PRIOR YEAR SUPPLEMENTALS, AMENDMENTS, AND RELEASES

 

GENERAL NOTES
1. All years referred to are fiscal years, unless otherwise noted.
2. Detail in these documents may not add to the totals due to rounding.

OMB Contributors to the 2014 Budget

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/contributors

The following personnel contributed to the preparation of this publication. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of others throughout the Government also deserve credit for their valuable contributions.

A

Andrew Abrams
Chandana Achanta
Brenda Aguilar
Shagufta I. Ahmed
Steven D. Aitken
Jameela R. Akbari
David Alekson
Clydea M. Allaire
Julie Allen
Victoria L. Allred
Lois E. Altoft
Aaron Ampaw
Scott J. Anchin
Lauren Antelo
Anna R. Arroyo
Emily E. Askew
Ari Isaacman Astles
Lisa L. August
Renee Austin

B

Peter M. Babb
Susan Badgett
Jessie W. Bailey
Paul W. Baker
Carol Bales
Bethanne Barnes
Patti Barnett
Jody Barringer
Avital Bar-Shalom
Mary C. Barth
Sarah Bashadi
Alison Beason
Margot Beausey
Jennifer Wagner Bell
Steven Bennett
Joseph Berger
Sam K. Berger
Lindsey R. Berman
Scott A. Bernard
Elizabeth Bernhard
Boris Bershteyn
Mathew C. Blum
James Boden
Melissa B. Bomberger
Dan Bonesteel
Cole Borders
Bill Boyd
Chantel M. Boyens
Brianna Bradford-Benesh
Paul B. Bradley
Betty I. Bradshaw
Nicole A. Bradstreet
Joshua J. Brammer
Michael Branson
Shannon Bregman
Andrea Brian
Candice M. Bronack
Jonathan M. Brooks
Christopher Broome
Calla R. Brown
Dustin S. Brown
Elizabeth M. Brown
Eric Brown
Jamal T. O. Brown
James A. Brown
Jontia Brown
Kelly D. Brown
Michael Brunetto
Paul Bugg
Tom D. Bullers
Robert Bullock
Erin Boeke Burke
Benjamin Burnett
Ryan M. Burnette
John D. Burnim
John C. Burton
Nathaniel Buss
Mark Bussow

C

Kathleen Cahill
Steven Cahill
William H. Campbell
Mark F. Cancian
Malissa Candland
Eric D. Cardoza
J. Kevin Carroll
Mario J. Carroll
William S. Carroll
Scott Carson
Adam Case
Mary I. Cassell
David Cassidy
Benjamin Chan
Daniel E. Chandler
James Chase
Anita Chellaraj
Michael C. Clark
Ashley Cleaves
Braye Gregory Cloud
Rosye B. Cloud
Daniel Cohen
Victoria Collin
Debra M. Collins
Kelly T. Colyar
Nicole E. Comisky
David C. Connolly
Martha B. Coven
Catherine Crato
Joseph Crilley
Rosemarie C. Crow
Michael F. Crowley
Craig Crutchfield
C. Tyler Curtis
William P. Curtis

D

Rowena Dagang
Veronica Daigle
Neil B. Danberg
Kristy L. Daphnis
Michael P. Darling
Alexander J. Daumit
Joanne Davenport
John Davis
Ken Davis
Margaret B. Davis-
Christian
Brian Dewhurst
John H. Dick, Jr.
China Dickerson
Frank DiGiammarino
Jason Dixson
Angela M. Donatelli
Norman Dong
Paul Donohue
Bridget C. E. Dooling
Shamera Dorsey
Lisa Driskill
Francis DuFrayne
Laura Duke

E

Jacqueline A. Easley
Mabel E. Echols
Jeanette Edwards
Emily M. Eelman
C. J. Elliot
Lisa Ellman
Noah Engelberg
Michelle A. Enger
Sally Ericsson
Andrew H. Erwin
Mark Erwin
Victoria Espinel
Edward V. Etzkorn
Rowe Ewell

F

Chris Fairhall
Robert S. Fairweather
Edna T. Falk Curtin
Michael C. Falkenheim
Kara Farley-Cahill
Christine Farquharson
Kira R. Fatherree
Andrew R. Feldman
Nicole A. Fernandes
Patricia A. Ferrell
Lesley A. Field
Mary Fischietto
E. Holly Fitter
Mary E. Fitzpatrick
Darlene B. Fleming
Tera Fong
Keith Fontenot
James Ford-Fleming
Nicholas A. Fraser
Marc Freiman
Farrah B. Freis
Virginia French
Nathan J. Frey
Patrick J. Fuchs

G

Arti Garg
Marc Garufi
Thomas Gates
Benjamin P.O. Geare
Elaine Geiser
Jeremy J. Gelb
Brian Gillis
Dori Glanz
David Glaudemans
Joshua Glazer
Kimberly G. Glenn
Gary Glickman
Ja’Cia D. Goins
Ariel Gold
Jeffrey Goldstein
Oscar Gonzalez
Robert M. Gordon
Tom Grannemann
Kathleen Gravelle
Richard E. Green
Aron Greenberg
Hester Grippando
Rebecca Grusky

H

Michael B. Hagan
Susan J. Haggerty
Christopher C. Hall
Erika S. Hamalainen
Kathleen D. Hamm
Christina Hansen
Eric V. Hansen
Linda W. Hardin
Dionne M. Hardy
David Harmon
Patsy W. (Pat) Harris
Brian Harris-Kojetin
Nicholas R. Hart
Paul Harvey

H (continued)

Ryan Harvey
Aisha Hasan
Tomer Hasson
Adam Hatton
David J. Haun
Laurel Havas
Mark H. Hazelgren
John Henson
Kevin W. Herms
Alex Hettinger
Gretchen T. Hickey
Michael Hickey
Beth N. Higa
Heather A. Higginbottom
Cortney J. Higgins
Mary Lou Hildreth
Andrew Hire
Thomas E. Hitter
Jennifer Hoef
Michael C. Hoehn
Joanne Cianci Hoff
Adam Hoffberg
Stuart Hoffman
Troy Holland
Jim Holm
Peter M. Holm
Daniel Hornung
Lynette Hornung-Kobes
Laura E. House
Grace Hu
Kathy M. Hudgins
Jeremy D. Hulick
James Hundt
Alexander T. Hunt
Lorraine D. Hunt
James C. Hurban
Jaki Mayer Hurwitz
Kristen D. Hyatt
Dana J. Hyde

I

Robert Ikoku
Tae H. Im
Janet Irwin
Paul Iwugo

J

Laurence R. Jacobson
Carol D. Jenkins
Aaron D. Joachim
Barbara A. Johnson
Carol Johnson
Kim I. Johnson
Michael D. Johnson
Bryant A. Jones
Danielle Y. Jones
Denise Bray Jones
Lisa M. Jones
Scott W. Jones
Joseph G. Jordan
Hee K. Jun

K

Paul Kagan
Richard Kane
Jamie Kanselbaum
Jacob H. Kaplan
Irene B. Kariampuzha
Jenifer Karwoski
Molly M. Kawahata
Nathaniel Kayhoe
Regina Kearney
Ed Kearns
Dan Keenaghan
Matthew J. Keeneth
Hunter Kellett
John W. Kelly
Ann H. Kendrall
Nancy Kenly
Amanda R. Kepko
Paul E. Kilbride
Cristina Killingsworth
Barry D. King
Kelly Kinneen
Carole E. Kitti
Ben Klay
Sarah Klein
Emily Kornegay
Steven M. Kosiak
John Kraemer
Lori A. Krauss
Shannon Kroll
Alison C. Kukla
Joydip Kundu

L

Chris LaBaw
Katherine T. LaBeau
Leonard L. Lainhart
James A. Laity
Chad A. Lallemand
Lawrence L. Lambert
Daniel LaPlaca
Phil Larson
Janisa LaSalle
Eric P. Lauer
Jessie LaVine
David Lee
Jessica Lee
Karen F. Lee
Sarah S. Lee
Susan Leetmaa
Maximillian Lehman
Bryan León
Jeremy León
Andrea Leung
Stuart Levenbach
Anthony Lewandowsky
George Lewis
Sheila D. Lewis
Wendy Liberante
Richard A.
Lichtenberger
Sara Rose Lichtenstein
Kristina E. Lilac
Jennifer M. Lipiew
Lin C. Liu
Patrick G. Locke
Brandi M. Lofton
Aaron M. Lopata
Alexander W. Louie
Adrienne C. Erbach Lucas
Kimberley Luczynski
Thomas S. Lue
Gideon F. Lukens
Sarah Lyberg
Laura E. Lynch
Randolph M. Lyon

M

Chi T. Mac
Debbie Macaulay
Ryan J. MacMaster
John S. MacNeil
Natalia Mahmud
Claire A. Mahoney
Mikko Mäkäräinen
Kathryn (Katie) Malague
Margaret A. Malanoski
Thomas J. Mancinelli
Dominic J. Mancini
Robert Mann
Sharon Mar
Celinda A. Marsh
Brendan A. Martin
Kathryn Martin
Rochelle Wilkie
Martinez
Meg Massey
Daniel P. Matheny
Surujpat J. Adrian
Mathura
Shelly McAllister
George McArdle
Alexander J. McClelland
Jeremy McCrary
Brenda McCullough
Anthony W. McDonald
Christine McDonald
Katrina A. McDonald
Renford McDonald
Mark McDonnell
Luther McGinty
Christopher McLaren
Robin J. McLaughry
Andrew McMahon
William J. McQuaid
William J. Mea
Inna L. Melamed
Flavio Menasce
Jessica Nielsen Menter
P. Thaddeus Messenger
Shelley Metzenbaum
William L. Metzger
Joanna M. Mikulski
Julie L. Miller
Kimberly Miller
Asma Mirza
Amanda Mitchum
Joe Montoni
Cindy Moon
Jamesa C. Moone
Roxana Moussavian
Whitney Moyer
Moira Mack Muntz
Edward A. Murphy, Jr.
Jennifer Winkler Murray
Chris Music

N

Jennifer Nading
Jeptha E. Nafziger
Larry Nagl
Barry Napear
Ashley Michelle Nathanson
Allie Neill
Adam Neufeld
Melissa K. Neuman
Betsy Newcomer
Joan F. Newhart
John Newman
Kimberly A. Newman
Kevin F. Neyland
Teresa Nguyen
Eric C. Ngwa
Alex Niejelow
Abigail P. Norris
Tim H. Nusraty

O

Erin L. O’Brien
Devin O’Connor
Matthew J. O’Kane
Matthew Olsen
Dennis P. O’Neil

Steve Onley

Jared Ostermiller
Tyler J. Overstreet
Brooke Owens

P

Ben Page
Jennifer Park
Sangkyun Park
Joel R. Parriott
John Pasquantino
Terri B. Payne
Jacqueline M. Peay
Falisa L. Peoples-Tittle
Kathleen Peroff
Andrew B. Perraut
Mike Perz
Andrea M. Petro
Stacey Que-Chi Pham
Carolyn R. Phelps
Karen A. Pica
Joseph G. Pipan
Verite Pitts
Alisa M. Ple-Plakon
Rachel C. Pollock
Ruxandra I. Pond
Steven C. Posner
Jonathan B. Porat
Lindsey Powell
Celestine M. Pressley
Jamie Price Pressly
Larrimer Prestosa
Marguerite Pridgen
Robert B. Purdy

Q

John P. Quinlan

R

Jonathan E. Rackoff
Lucas R. Radzinschi
Latonda Glass Raft
Jose Angelo Ramilo
Jamil Ramsey
Maria Raphael
Jeffrey Reczek
McGavock D. Reed
Tiffany Reeser
Rudy Regner
Paul B. Rehmus
Jake Reilly
Sean Reilly
Thomas M. Reilly
Scott Renda
Richard J. Renomeron
Kent Reynolds
Keri A. Rice
M. David Rice
Gavette A. Richardson
Shannon Richter
Justin Riordan
Emma K. Roach
Benjamin Roberts
Donovan O. Robinson
Marshall Rodgers
Alexandra Rogers
Meredith B. Romley
Dan T. Rosenbaum
Adam J. Ross
David Rowe
Mario D. Roy
Trevor H. Rudolph
Chris Rupar
Ryan Rusnak
Latisha Russell
Kristin Rzeczkowski

S

Fouad P. Saad
Aparna Saha
John Asa Saldivar
Dominic K. Sale
Mark S. Sandy
Jessica R. Santillo
Kristen J. Sarri
Aschley Schiller
Lisa A. Schlosser
Tricia Schmitt
Andrew M. Schoenbach
Daniel Schory
Margo Schwab
Nancy Schwartz
Jasmeet K. Seehra
Will Sellheim
Emily L. Sharp
Dianne Shaughnessy
Paul Shawcross
Sophie M. Shulman
Gary Shortencarrier
Sophie M. Shulman
Mary Jo Siclari
Sara R. Sills
Samantha Silverberg
Angela M. Simms
Rhonda M. Sinkfield
Benjamin Skidmore
Jack A. Smalligan
Curtina O. Smith
Jan Smith
Nikolis R. Smith
Joanne E. Snow
Carolyn Snyder
Sarah Snyder
Silvana Solano
Kathryn B. Stack
Scott Stambaugh
Melanie A. Stansbury
Andrea M. Staron
Nora Stein
Gary Stofko
Carla B. Stone
Shayna Strom
Shannon Stuart
Tom Suarez
Brett J. Sullivan
Kevin J. Sullivan
Jessica Sun
Indraneel Sur
Harry K. Swann
Jennifer Swartz
Benjamin R. Sweezy
Christina Swoope

T

Teresa A. Tancre
Naomi Stern Taransky
Benjamin K. Taylor
Myra Taylor
Raina Thiele
Amanda I. Thomas
Judith F. Thomas
LaTina Thomas
Paul E. Thomas
Will Thomas
Shelley Thompson
Courtney B. Timberlake
Thomas Tobasko
Toinita Tolson
Richard Toner
Taryn H. Toyama
Gilbert Tran
Minh-Hai Tran-Lam
Susan M. Truslow
Donald L. Tuck
Benjamin J. Turpen

U

Nick Uchalik
Darrell J. Upshaw

V

Matthew J. Vaeth
Kathleen M. Valentine
Ofelia M. Valeriano
Amanda L. Valerio
Cynthia A. Vallina
Sarita Vanka
Steven L. VanRoekel
David W. Varvel
Areletha L. Venson
Alexandra Ventura
Patricia A. Vinkenes
Dean Vonk
Kathy Voorhees
David Vorhaus
Ann M. Vrabel

W

James A. Wade
James (Rusty) Walker
Martha A. Wallace
Katherine K. Wallman
Heather V. Walsh
Timothy Wang
Sharon A. Warner
Gary Waxman
Mark A. Weatherly
Bessie M. Weaver
Jeffrey A. Weinberg
Philip R. Wenger
Daniel Werfel
Mike Wetklow
Arnette C. White
Catherine White
Kamela G. White
Kim S. White
Sherron R. White
Chad S. Whiteman
Robert T. Whitley
Sarah Widor
Mary Ellen Wiggins
Shimika Wilder
Chavon Renee Wilkerson
Debra L. (Debbie) Williams
Monique C. Williams
Ross D. Williams
Julia B. Wise
Julie A. Wise
Elizabeth Wolkomir
Gary Wong
Hermine Wong
Raymond Wong
Lauren Wright
Sophia Wright
Steven Wynands

Y

Abra Yeh
Melany N. Yeung
Theany Yin

Z

Diane Zayas-Veles
Jeff Zients
Gail S. Zimmerman
Rachel Zinn
Rita Zota
Lindsay Zwiener

Past Budgets

Source: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionGPO.action?collectionCode=BUDGET

BUDGET OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

Issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Budget of the United States Government is a collection of documents that contains the budget message of the President, information about the President's budget proposals for a given fiscal year, and other budgetary publications that have been issued throughout the fiscal year. Other related and supporting budget publications are included, which may vary from year to year.About the Budget of the United States Government

GPO has signed and certified the PDF files to assure users that the online documents are official and authentic. The digitally signed PDF files should be viewed using Adobe Acrobat or Reader version 7.0 or higher. Download the most recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Public Budget Databases Users Guide

Source: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BUDGET-...-2014-DB-4.pdf (PDF)

Budget of the United States Government

Fiscal Year 2014
Prepared by:
Budget Analysis Branch
Office of Management and Budget
April 2013
 
This document describes six data files that contain an extract of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) budget database. These files can be used to reproduce many of the totals published in the Budget and examine unpublished details below the levels of aggregation published in the Budget. These data, however, have some limitation to their scope and usefulness.
 
The following sections describe the sources and limitations of the data, as well as the content, format, and coding of the data files.

1. Data Sources and Limitations

a. Sources of Data

Historical data for completed fiscal years are summarized from the financial records of the U.S. Government maintained by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the Department of the Treasury. The totals are generally consistent with data published in the Monthly Treasury Statement, by the Fiscal Service of the Department of the Treasury. Differences between the Treasury publications and the Budget arise from a small number of reporting and classification corrections made subsequent to the Treasury publications and some conceptual differences between OMB and Treasury reporting.
 
In addition, these historical records are adjusted each year to conform to the agency and account structure of the current budget. For example, data originally reported in the 1966 Budget by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, now appear under the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Education, or the Social Security Administration, as appropriate. Lastly, the historical database has been updated for changes in the functional classification of accounts and in the Budget Enforcement Act (BEA) categorization. Budget estimates for the current fiscal year (2013) and the budget year (2014) are prepared by agencies, based on the definitions and guidance contained in OMB Circular A-11, “Preparation, Submission, and Execution of the Budget.” Budget totals for these years reflect the President’s fiscal policy and economic assumptions, which are extensively described in the Budget documents.
 
The data files provide sufficient detail to produce: (a) outlay totals by agency, subfunction, and Budget Enforcement Act category that are consistent with the totals presented in the 2014 Budget; (b) receipt totals by source, as shown in various published tables in the Budget; and (c) the deficit (on-budget, off-budget, and unified budget basis). In addition, outlays can be further disaggregated by grants to State and local governments and non-grants.
 

b. Fiscal Years

The data in these files are for fiscal years. Prior to 1977, the fiscal year began on July 1 and ended on June 30. For example, fiscal year 1965 began on July 1, 1964, and ended on June 30, 1965. Beginning with fiscal year 1977, the fiscal year begins on October 1 and ends on September 30. For example, fiscal year 2011 began on October 1, 2010, and ended on September 30, 2011. Fiscal year 1976 ended on June 30, 1976, and fiscal year 1977 began on October 1, 1976. The period July 1, 1976, to September 30, 1976, is called the “transition quarter” or TQ.

c. Units of Measure

Data for budget authority, outlays, offsetting receipts, and governmental receipts are shown in thousands of dollars.

d. Limitations

These data files do not contain data by object classes, data for program and financing accounts, character class (other than grants to State and local governments), personnel summaries, or credit schedules. Account-level details are based on the proposed Budget only and do not include current services estimates.
 
With few exceptions, these files present account-level details that are consistent with the account structure of the current Budget. For governmental receipts and offsetting receipts, data prior to 1982 are aggregates in sufficient detail to produce the published tables, but are not “true” account-level details. For budget authority, no data are available prior to 1976. For outlays, data for 1962-1981 tend to be account-level details. Exceptions include the Legislative Branch and Department of Defense, which are available only at bureau-level detail in the earlier years.
 
Users of these data files should be careful to review and understand the effects that these limitations may have on their analysis of budget data and trends. For example, computation of compound annual growth rates of various receipt accounts in the Budget could be severely affected by the discontinuities in account-level details prior to 1982.

e. Further Information

Readers who are not already familiar with the Federal Budget should gain a familiarity with the concepts and organization of the budget before proceeding. The following documents may be helpful:
 
Analytical Perspectives, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2014. This document contains analyses that are designed to highlight specified program areas or provide other significant presentations of Budget data that place the Budget in perspective. It includes a discussion of the concepts underlying the organization of the Budget and the presentation of Budget data, economic assumptions underlying the Budget estimates, Federal receipts and collections, including user fees and tax expenditures, Federal spending, the Budget Enforcement Act, and other topics. A particularly useful chapter is “Budget Concepts,” which contains a discussion of budget concepts. Also of particular use is a report entitled, “Table 32-1. Federal Programs by Agency and Account,” which contains a listing of all appropriation and fund accounts in the Budget. (This report is available online in the Supplemental Materials section at: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget...Perspectives/.)
 
OMB Circular A-11 provides instructions to agencies in preparing Budget submissions, including details for entry into the Budget database.
 
In addition, there is extensive literature on the Federal Budget that could be usefully consulted.

2. Data Files and File Formats

The account-level data is available in spreadsheet and file import format.

a. Spreadsheet Format

Files are provided in “XLS” and “CSV” formats. Virtually any spreadsheet program can read at least one of these common formats. In “CSV” format, data fields are separated by commas, text fields are contained inside double quote marks, and numerical fields do not have embedded commas. Each record is contained on a single line. This format is commonly used by database software. Separate files for receipts, outlays, and budget authority are available in each of these formats and are described in detail below.

b. File Names, Contents, and Sequence

In all files, the records are sequenced by agency code, bureau code, account code, subfunction code, BEA category, grant/non-grant, and on-/off-budget field.
 
The files with the account-level data are:
outlays.xls Outlays and offsetting receipts, 1962-2018, in spreadsheet format.
outlays.csv Outlays and offsetting receipts, 1962-2018, in file import format.
 
receipts.xls Governmental receipts, 1962-2018, in spreadsheet format.
receipts.csv Governmental receipts, 1962-2018, in file import format.
 
budauth.xls Budget authority and offsetting receipts, 1976-2018, in spreadsheet format.
budauth.csv Budget authority and offsetting receipts, 1976-2018, in file import format.
 
Offsetting receipts are in the budget authority files as well as the outlay files. These amounts are needed to calculate net budget authority and net outlays.

3. Categorization of Budget Data

The categorization of budget data differs slightly among receipts, outlays, and budget authority files.

a. Budget Authority and Outlay Files

Account details are categorized using the following keys:
 
Agency--Agency codes generally correspond to the Cabinet department or independent agency with primary responsibility for the program. There are two major exceptions to this definition: (1) the Legislative Branch and the Judiciary are displayed as agencies, though they are separate branches of Government; and (2) intragovernmental payments of interest to trust funds, payments of employer share of employee retirement contributions, and interest paid to the Outer Continental Shelf escrow account are classified as “undistributed offsetting receipts.” The agency coding used in the data files is consistent with the tables in the Budget documents that present budget authority and outlays by agency. These codes and titles differ from the “Treasury Agency” code, described below. In addition, some allowances are not distributed by agency or by function and are given a special agency code.
 
Bureau--Bureaus are major subdivisions within Cabinet departments that correspond to major organizational areas. Within Cabinet departments, these major organizational areas may be called “bureaus” (e.g., the Bureau of the Census within the Commerce Department or the Bureau of Labor Statistics within the Labor Department), “services” (e.g., the Internal Revenue Service within the Treasury Department or the Economic Research Service within the Agriculture Department); “offices” (e.g., Office of Postsecondary Education in the Education Department) or they may be broad budget categories (e.g., Procurement or Military Personnel in the Defense Department). Table 1 presents a listing of the agency and bureau categories used in the data files.
 
Account--These numbers are assigned by the Treasury Department and are used for budget presentation and financial management. In some instances, groups of small accounts (usually miscellaneous special and trust fund accounts) have been consolidated into single accounts.
 
Subfunction--Accounts are categorized by the subfunctions shown in Table 2. Accounts that include multiple subfunctions are subdivided into subfunction components.
 
Treasury Agency--These codes are defined in the Treasury Financial Manual, Supplement to Volume I, Federal Account Symbols and Titles, which contains the titles corresponding to these codes.
 
Budget Enforcement Act category--The Budget Enforcement Act (the “Act”) made distinctions between mandatory and discretionary accounts for certain provisions of the Act. This distinction is still used for scorekeeping and accounts are categorized accordingly. Initially, accounts were assigned categories based on the agreement shown in the Act’s statement of managers. Since that time, Administration and Congressional scorekeepers maintain the list, assigning new accounts and adjusting existing accounts when there is agreement. Where an account includes mandatory and discretionary activities, separate lines of data, appropriately coded, will be found in the data files. The possible values for this code are:
 
Discretionary--Discretionary spending is controlled through annual appropriations acts.
 
Mandatory--Mandatory spending generally operates under permanent authority. Statutes generally specify what must be paid and who is eligible to receive payments. Governmental receipt accounts are categorized as “governmental receipts” as described below.
 
Net interest--Interest payments to and from the public and intragovernmental payments of interest, primarily to trust funds, are not included as either mandatory or discretionary spending.
 
Readers wanting more information on this topic may refer to several chapters in the Analytical Perspectives volume.
 
Grant/Non-grant--Grants to State and local governments are separated from non-grant outlays, based on the definitions in OMB Circular A-11 for schedule C data.

b. Receipts Files

Receipt account data are categorized as follows:
 
Source category--These are major categories of governmental receipts, such as individual income tax receipts or corporation income tax receipts. (See Table 3.)
 
Source subcategory--These present further detail within source categories. (See Table 3.)
 
Account--These are assigned by the Treasury Department and are used for budget presentation as well as financial management. In some instances, groups of small accounts (usually miscellaneous receipt accounts) have been consolidated into single accounts.
 
Treasury Agency--These codes are defined in the Treasury Financial Manual, Supplement to Volume I, Federal Account Symbols and Titles, which contains the titles corresponding to these codes.

4. Description of the Fields in the Outlay Files

The following table describes the fields of data for the account-level files. For data files in spreadsheet format, the fields are separate spreadsheet columns. For files in file import format, commas, as previously described, separate the fields.
 
Field number Field name Description Valid values
1 Agency code 3-digit numerical code for Cabinet department or independent agency See Table 1 (below) “Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes”
2 Agency name Agency name from Table 1 (maximum: 89 characters) See Table 1
3 Bureau code 2-digit numerical code for the bureau within the Cabinet department or independent agency See Table 1
4 Bureau name Bureau name from Table 1 (maximum: 89 characters) See Table 1
5 Account code 4-digit code (outlays) or 6-digit code (offsetting receipts) Any 4- or 6-digit number
6 Account name Account name (maximum: 160 characters) Any text
7 Treasury Agency code 2-digit numerical code for the agency, assigned by the Treasury Department See Treasury publication cited above
8 Subfunction code 3-digit numerical code for the subfunction See Table 2, “Listing of Functions and Subfunctions”
9 Subfunction title Subfunction title (maximum: 72 characters) See Table 2
10 BEA category Budget Enforcement Act category “Mandatory,” “Discretionary,” or “Net interest”
11 Grant/non-grant split Identifier to indicate if the outlays are grant or non-grant (outlays only) “Grant” or “Nongrant”
12 On- and off-budget indicator Social Security trust funds and the Postal Service are off-budget, all other accounts are on-budget “On-budget” or “Off-budget”
13 1962 value Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 1962 Outlays are usually positive values. Offsetting receipts are usually negative values.
14-27 1963 – 1976 values Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for each fiscal year (same as above)
28 TQ value Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for the “transitional quarter” (see note above) (same as above)
29-64 1977 – 2012 values Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for each fiscal year (same as above)
65-70 2013 – 2018 values Estimated amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 2013 through FY 2018 (same as above)
 

5. Description of the Fields in the Budget Authority Files

The following table describes the fields of data for the account-level files. For data files in spreadsheet format, the fields are separate spreadsheet columns. For files in file import format, the fields are separated by commas, as described above.
 
Field number Field name Description Valid values
1 Agency code 3-digit numerical code for Cabinet department or independent agency See Table 1 (below) “Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes”
2 Agency name Agency name from Table 1 (maximum: 89 characters) See Table 1
3 Bureau code 2-digit numerical code for the bureau within the Cabinet department or independent agency See Table 1
4 Bureau name Bureau name from Table 1 (maximum: 89 characters) See Table 1
5 Account code 4-digit code (outlays) or 6-digit code (offsetting receipts) Any 4- or 6- digit number
6 Account name Account name (maximum: 160 characters) Any text
7 Treasury Agency code 2-digit numerical code for the agency, assigned by the Treasury Department See Treasury publication cited above
8 Subfunction code 3-digit numerical code for the subfunction See Table 2, “Listing of Functions and Subfunctions”
9 Subfunction title Subfunction title (maximum: 72 characters) See Table 2
10 BEA category Budget Enforcement Act category “Mandatory,” “Discretionary,” or “Net interest”
11 On- and offbudget indicator Social Security trust funds and the Postal Service are off-budget, all other accounts are on-budget “On-budget” or “Off-budget”
12 1976 value Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 1976 Budget authority is usually shown as a positive value. Offsetting receipts are usually negative values.
13 TQ value Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for the “transitional quarter” (see note above) (same as above)
14-49 1977 – 2012 values Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for each fiscal year (same as above)
50-55 2012 – 2018 values Estimated amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 2013 through FY 2018 (same as above)

 

6. Description of the Fields in the Receipts Files

The following table describes the fields of data for the account-level files. For data files in spreadsheet format, the fields are separate spreadsheet columns. For files in file import format, the fields are separated by commas, as described above.
 
Field number Field name Description Valid values
1 Source category code 3-digit numerical code for source category See Table 3 (below)  “Source Categories for Receipts”
2 Source category name Title for receipts category (maximum: 41 characters) See Table 3
3 Source subcategory 2-digit numerical code for the source subcategory See Table 3
4 Source subcategory name Title for receipts subcategory (maximum: 35 characters) See Table 3
5 Agency code 3-digit numerical code for Cabinet department or independent agency See Table 1 (below) “Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes”
6 Agency name Agency name from Table 1 (maximum: 89 characters) See Table 1
7 Bureau code 2-digit numerical code for the bureau within the Cabinet department or independent agency See Table 1
8 Bureau name Bureau name from Table 1 (maximum: 89 characters) See Table 1
9 Account code 6-digit numerical code for the account Any 6-digit number
10 Account name Account name (maximum: 114 characters) Any text
11 Treasury Agency code 2-digit numerical code for the agency, assigned by the Treasury Department See Treasury publication cited above
12 On- and off-budget indicator Social Security trust funds and the Postal Service are off-budget, all other accounts are on-budget “On-budget” or “Off-budget”
13 1962 value Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 1962 Receipts are usually shown as positive values
14 - 27 1963 - 1976 values Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 1963 through FY 1976 (same as above)
28 TQ value Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for the “transitional quarter” (see note above) (same as above)
29-64 1977 - 2012 values Actual amounts, in thousands of dollars, for each fiscal year (same as above)
65-70 2013 - 2018 values Estimated amounts, in thousands of dollars, for FY 2013 through FY 2018 (same as above)

 

7. Reference Tables

The following tables present: (a) agency and bureau codes and titles used in the data files; (b) function and subfunction codes and titles; and (c) receipt source category and subcategory titles.

Table 1. Listing of Agency and Bureau Codes

Agency Bureau Title
001 Legislative Branch
001 05 Senate
001 10 House of Representatives
001 11 Joint Items
001 12 Office of Compliance
001 13 Capitol Police
001 14 Congressional Budget Office
001 15 Architect of the Capitol
001 18 Botanic Garden
001 25 Library of Congress
001 30 Government Printing Office
001 35 Government Accountability Office
001 40 United States Tax Court
001 45 Legislative Branch Boards and Commissions
001 60 John C. Stennis Center for Public Service Training and Development
002 Judicial Branch
002 05 Supreme Court of the United States
002 07 United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit
002 10 Court of Customs and Patent Appeals
002 15 United States Court of International Trade
002 20 Court of Claims
002 25 Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and other Judicial Services
002 26 Administrative Office of the United States Courts
002 30 Federal Judicial Center
002 34 Bicentennial Expenses, The Judiciary
002 35 Judicial Retirement Funds
002 37 National Commission on Judicial Discipline and Removal
002 39 United States Sentencing Commission
002 42 Violent Crime Reduction Programs
002 99 The Judiciary, activities
005 Department of Agriculture
005 03 Office of the Secretary
005 04 Executive Operations
005 05 Departmental Management
005 06 Office of Communications
005 07 Office of Civil Rights
005 08 Office of Inspector General
005 09 Office of Chief Economist
005 10 Office of the General Counsel
005 11 National Appeals Division
005 13 Economic Research Service
005 Department of Agriculture – continued
005 15 National Agricultural Statistics Service
005 18 Agricultural Research Service
005 20 National Institute of Food and Agriculture
005 32 Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
005 35 Food Safety and Inspection Service
005 37 Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration
005 45 Agricultural Marketing Service
005 47 Risk Management Agency
005 49 Farm Service Agency
005 53 Natural Resources Conservation Service
005 55 Rural Development
005 60 Rural Utilities Service
005 63 Rural Housing Service
005 65 Rural Business—Cooperative Service
005 68 Foreign Agricultural Service
005 84 Food and Nutrition Service
005 96 Forest Service
006 Department of Commerce
006 05 Departmental Management
006 06 Economic Development Administration
006 07 Bureau of the Census
006 08 Economic and Statistical Analysis
006 15 Regional Development Program
006 25 International Trade Administration
006 30 Bureau of Industry and Security
006 40 Minority Business Development Agency
006 44 United States Travel and Tourism Administration
006 48 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
006 51 U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
006 53 Technology Administration
006 54 National Technical Information Service
006 55 National Institute of Standards and Technology
006 60 National Telecommunications and Information Administration
007 Department of Defense—Military Programs
007 05 Military Personnel
007 10 Operation and Maintenance
007 12 International Reconstruction and Other Assistance
007 15 Procurement
007 20 Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation
007 25 Military Construction
007 30 Family Housing
007 37 Special Foreign Currency Program
007 40 Revolving and Management Funds
007 45 Allowances
007 55 Trust Funds
009 Department of Health and Human Services
009 10 Food and Drug Administration
009 15 Health Resources and Services Administration
009 17 Indian Health Service
009 20 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
009 25 National Institutes of Health
009 30 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
009 33 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
009 35 Health Resources Administration
009 38 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
009 70 Administration for Children and Families
009 75 Administration for Community Living
009 90 Departmental Management
009 91 Program Support Center
009 92 Office of the Inspector General
010 Department of the Interior
010 04 Bureau of Land Management
010 06 Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
010 08 Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement
010 10 Bureau of Reclamation
010 11 Central Utah Project
010 12 United States Geological Survey
010 14 Bureau of Mines
010 18 United States Fish and Wildlife Service
010 20 National Biological Service
010 22 Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement
010 24 National Park Service
010 76 Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education
010 82 Insular Affairs
010 84 Departmental Offices
010 85 Insular Affairs
010 86 Office of the Solicitor
010 88 Office of Inspector General
010 90 Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians
010 92 National Indian Gaming Commission
010 95 Department-Wide Programs
011 Department of Justice
011 03 General Administration
011 04 United States Parole Commission
011 05 Legal Activities and U.S. Marshals
011 06 Radiation Exposure Compensation
011 07 Interagency Law Enforcement
011 08 National Security Division
011 10 Federal Bureau of Investigation
011 12 Drug Enforcement Administration
011 14 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives
011 20 Federal Prison System
011 21 Office of Justice Programs
011 30 Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund
012 Department of Labor
012 05 Employment and Training Administration
012 10 Office of the American Workplace
012 11 Employee Benefits Security Administration
012 12 Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation
012 15 Office of Workers' Compensation Programs
012 16 Wage and Hour Division
012 17 Employment Standards Administration
012 18 Occupational Safety and Health Administration
012 19 Mine Safety and Health Administration
012 20 Bureau of Labor Statistics
012 22 Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs
012 23 Office of Labor Management Standards
012 25 Departmental Management
014 Department of State
014 05 Administration of Foreign Affairs
014 10 International Organizations and Conferences
014 15 International Commissions
014 25 Other
015 Department of the Treasury
015 04 Financial Crimes Enforcement Network
015 05 Departmental Offices
015 07 Office of Revenue Sharing
015 09 Interagency Law Enforcement
015 11 Federal Financing Bank
015 12 Fiscal Service
015 13 Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau
015 20 Bureau of Engraving and Printing
015 25 United States Mint
015 45 Internal Revenue Service
015 57 Comptroller of the Currency
015 58 Office of Thrift Supervision
015 60 Interest on the Public Debt
015 99 Department of the Treasury, activities
Social Security Administration
016 00 Social Security Administration
017 00 Social Security Administration
018 Department of Education
018 10 Office of Elementary and Secondary Education
018 12 Office of Innovation and Improvement
018 15 Office of English Language Acquisition
018 20 Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
018 30 Office of Vocational and Adult Education
018 40 Office of Postsecondary Education
018 45 Office of Federal Student Aid
018 50 Institute of Education Sciences
018 80 Departmental Management
018 85 Hurricane Education Recovery
019 Department of Energy
019 05 National Nuclear Security Administration
019 10 Environmental and Other Defense Activities
019 20 Energy Programs
019 50 Power Marketing Administration
019 60 Departmental Administration
020 00 Environmental Protection Agency
021 Department of Transportation
021 04 Office of the Secretary
021 12 Federal Aviation Administration
021 15 Federal Highway Administration
021 17 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration
021 18 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
021 27 Federal Railroad Administration
021 36 Federal Transit Administration
021 40 Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation
021 50 Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
021 56 Office of Inspector General
021 61 Surface Transportation Board
021 65 Bureau of Transportation Statistics
021 Department of Transportation – continued
021 70 Maritime Administration
023 General Services Administration
023 05 Real Property Activities
023 10 Supply and Technology Activities
023 30 General Activities
024 Department of Homeland Security
024 10 Departmental Management and Operations
024 20 Office of the Inspector General
024 30 Citizenship and Immigration Services
024 40 United States Secret Service
024 43 Office of the Under Secretary for Border and Transportation Security
024 45 Transportation Security Administration
024 49 Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
024 50 Security, Enforcement, and Investigations
024 55 Immigration and Customs Enforcement
024 58 Customs and Border Protection
024 60 United States Coast Guard
024 65 National Protection and Programs Directorate
024 70 Federal Emergency Management Agency
024 80 Science and Technology
024 85 Domestic Nuclear Detection Office
024 90 Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection
025 Department of Housing and Urban Development
025 03 Public and Indian Housing Programs
025 06 Community Planning and Development
025 09 Housing Programs
025 12 Government National Mortgage Association
025 28 Policy Development and Research
025 29 Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity
025 32 Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes
025 35 Management and Administration
026 00 National Aeronautics and Space Administration
027 00 Office of Personnel Management
028 00 Small Business Administration
029 Department of Veterans Affairs
029 15 Veterans Health Administration
029 25 Benefits Programs
029 40 Departmental Administration
100 Executive Office of the President
100 05 The White House
100 10 Executive Residence at the White House
100 15 Special Assistance to the President and the Official Residence of the Vice President
100 20 Council of Economic Advisers
100 25 Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental Quality
100 26 Council on International Economic Policy
100 27 Council on Wage and Price Stability
100 30 Office of Policy Development
100 35 National Security Council and Homeland Security Council
100 40 National Space Council
100 45 National Critical Materials Council
100 50 Office of Administration
100 51 Armstrong Resolution
100 53 Office of National Service
100 55 Office of Management and Budget
100 60 Office of National Drug Control Policy
100 65 Office of Science and Technology Policy
100 70 Office of the United States Trade Representative
100 75 Office of Telecommunications Policy
100 80 The Points of Light Foundation
100 85 White House Conference for a Drug Free America
100 90 Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention
100 91 Office of Drug Abuse Policy
100 95 Unanticipated Needs
100 97 Expenses of Management Improvement
100 98 Presidential Transition
Other Independent Agencies
154 00 Federal Drug Control Programs
184 International Assistance Programs
184 03 Millennium Challenge Corporation
184 05 International Security Assistance
184 10 Multilateral Assistance
184 15 Agency for International Development
184 20 Overseas Private Investment Corporation
184 25 Trade and Development Agency
184 35 Peace Corps
184 40 Inter-American Foundation
184 50 African Development Foundation
184 60 International Monetary Programs
184 70 Military Sales Program
184 75 Special Assistance Initiatives
184 77 Special Assistance for Israel
184 80 International Commodity Agreements
184 82 Economic Stabilization Activities
200 Other Defense Civil Programs
200 05 Military Retirement
200 07 Retiree Health Care
200 10 Educational Benefits
200 15 American Battle Monuments Commission
200 20 Armed Forces Retirement Home
200 25 Cemeterial Expenses
200 30 Forest and Wildlife Conservation, Military Reservations
200 35 The Mildred and Claude Pepper Foundation
200 40 Ryukyu Islands, Army
200 45 Selective Service System
202 00 Corps of Engineers—Civil Works
301 00 ACTION
302 00 Administrative Conference of the United States
303 00 Advisory Commission on Conferences in Ocean Shipping
304 00 Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations
305 00 Advisory Committee on Federal Pay
306 00 Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
308 00 American Revolution Bicentennial Administration
309 00 Appalachian Regional Commission
310 00 Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board
312 00 Aviation Safety Commission
313 00 Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation
315 00 Cabinet Comm on Opportunities for Spanish Speaking
316 00 Central Intelligence Agency
318 00 Christopher Columbus Quincentennary Jubilee Commission
319 00 Citizens’ Commission on Public Service and Compensation
321 00 Commission for the Preservation of America’s Heritage Abroad
322 00 Commission for the Study of International Migration and Cooperative Economic Development
323 00 Commission of Fine Arts
324 00 Commission on Agricultural Workers
325 00 Commission on American Shipbuilding
326 00 Commission on Civil Rights
327 00 Commission on Education of the Deaf
329 00 Commission on Federal Paperwork
330 00 Commission on Government Procurement
331 00 Commission on National and Community Service
332 00 Commission on Highway Beautification
333 00 Commission on the Bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution
334 00 Comm on Org of the Gov for Conduct of Foreign Poli
335 00 Comm on Review of National Policy Toward Gambling
336 00 Commission on the Ukraine Famine
338 00 Committee for Purchase from People who are Blind or Severely Disabled, activities
339 00 Commodity Futures Trading Commission
340 00 Community Development Credit Unions Revolving Fund
341 00 Community Services Administration
342 00 Construction Corregidor-Bataan Memorial
343 00 Consumer Product Safety Commission
344 00 Corporation for Public Broadcasting
345 00 United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims
346 00 Defense Manpower Commission
347 00 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board
348 00 Delaware River Basin Commission
349 District of Columbia
349 10 District of Columbia Courts
349 20 District of Columbia Corrections
349 30 District of Columbia General and Special Payments
349 40 District of Columbia Financing
350 00 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
351 00 Export-Import Bank of the United States
352 00 Farm Credit Administration
353 00 Farm Credit System Assistance Board
354 00 Farm Credit System Financial Assistance Corporation
355 00 Farm Credit System Insurance Corporation
356 00 Federal Communications Commission
357 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
357 10 Bank Insurance
357 20 Deposit Insurance
357 30 FSLIC Resolution
357 35 Orderly Liquidation
357 40 FDIC–Office of Inspector General
360 00 Federal Election Commission
362 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
362 10 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
362 20 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council Appraisal Subcommittee
364 00 Federal Housing Finance Board
365 00 Federal Labor Relations Authority
366 00 Federal Maritime Commission
367 00 Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service
368 00 Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission
369 00 Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board
370 00 Federal Trade Commission
371 00 Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission
372 00 Harry S Truman Scholarship Foundation
373 00 Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development
376 00 United States Interagency Council on Homelessness
377 00 International Cultural and Trade Center Commission
378 00 International Trade Commission
379 00 Interstate Commerce Commission
380 00 Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin
381 00 James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation
382 00 Japan-United States Friendship Commission
383 00 Joint Commission on the Coinage
384 00 Joint Federal-State Land Use Planning Commission
385 00 Legal Services Corporation
386 00 Lowell Historical Canyon District Commission
387 00 Marine Mammal Commission
388 00 Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission
389 00 Merit Systems Protection Board
390 00 Motor Carrier Ratemaking Study Commission
391 00 National Afro-American History and Culture Commission
392 00 National Alcohol Fuels Commission
393 00 National Archives and Records Administration
394 00 National Capital Planning Commission
395 00 National Commission on American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Housing
396 00 Nat. Comm. for the Review of Federal and State Laws
397 00 National Commission on Agricultural Finance
400 00 National Commission on Libraries and Information Science
401 00 National Commission on Migrant Education
402 00 National Commission on Responsibilities for Financing Postsecondary Education
403 00 National Commission on Severely Distressed Public Housing
404 00 National Commission on Social Security
405 00 National Commission on Student Financial Assist.
406 00 National Commission on Supplies and Shortages
407 00 Nat Comm on Financing of Postsecondary Education
408 00 Nat Comm on the International Year of the Child
409 00 Nat Comm on the Observance of Inter Year of Women
410 00 National Commission on Water Quality
411 00 National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality
412 00 National Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse
413 00 National Council on Disability
414 00 National Council on Public Works Improvement
415 00 National Credit Union Administration
416 00 National Economic Commission, Salaries & Expenses
417 00 National Endowment for the Arts
418 00 National Endowment for the Humanities
419 00 National Institute of Building Sciences
420 00 National Labor Relations Board
421 00 National Mediation Board
422 00 National Science Foundation
423 00 National Transportation Policy Study Commission
424 00 National Transportation Safety Board
425 00 National Water Commission
426 00 Native Hawaiians Study Commission
428 00 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation
429 00 Nuclear Regulatory Commission
430 00 Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee
431 00 Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board
432 00 Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission
434 00 Office of Government Ethics
435 00 Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation
436 00 Office of Special Counsel
437 00 Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator
438 00 Panama Canal Commission
440 00 Postal Service
441 00 Pres. Comm. for Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine
442 00 President’s Commission on Catastrophic Nuclear Accidents
443 00 President’s Commission on Pension Policy
444 00 President's Council on Youth Opportunities
445 00 Privacy Protection Study Commission
446 00 Railroad Retirement Board
447 00 Renegotiation Board
448 00 Resolution Trust Corporation
449 00 Securities and Exchange Commission
450 00 Select Commission on Immigration & Refugee Policy
452 00 Smithsonian Institution
453 00 State Justice Institute
454 00 Susquehanna River Basin Commission
455 00 Tennessee Valley Authority
456 00 United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
458 00 United States Institute of Peace
459 00 United States Metric Board
460 00 United States Railway Association
462 00 United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation
463 00 Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority
464 00 Water Resources Council
465 00 Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation
466 00 Community Investment Program
467 00 Intelligence Community Management Account
468 00 Affordable Housing and Bank Enterprise (FDIC)
469 00 Joint Federal-State Commission on Policies and Programs Affecting Alaska Natives
470 00 National Advisory Council on the Public Service
474 00 Institute of Museum and Library Services
475 00 Thomas Jefferson Commemoration Commission
476 00 United Mine Workers of America Benefit Funds
477 00 Emergency Loan Guarantee Board
478 00 National Council on Indian Opportunities
482 00 National Commission on Cost of Higher Education
483 00 National Commission on Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement
484 00 National Commission on Independent Higher Education
485 00 Corporation for National and Community Service
486 00 United States Enrichment Corporation Fund
487 00 Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation
491 00 JFK Assassination Records Review Board
492 00 National Education Goals Panel
493 00 National Education Standards and Improvement Council
499 00 Ounce of Prevention Council
500 00 National Bankruptcy Review Commission
505 00 Other Commissions and Boards
506 00 River Basin Commissions
510 00 Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board
511 00 Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia
512 00 Presidio Trust
513 00 Denali Commission
514 00 Broadcasting Board of Governors
515 00 Commission on Ocean Policy
516 00 Oklahoma City National Memorial Trust
517 00 Delta Regional Authority
518 00 National Veterans Business Development Corporation
519 00 Vietnam Education Foundation
521 00 United States-Canada Alaska Rail Commission
525 00 Election Assistance Commission
526 00 Public Company Accounting Oversight Board
527 00 Standard Setting Body
528 00 Telecommunications Development Fund
530 00 Affordable Housing Program
531 00 Electric Reliability Organization
534 00 Office of the Federal Coordinator for Alaska Natural Gas
Transportation Projects
535 00 Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board
537 00 Federal Housing Finance Agency
538 00 National Infrastructure Bank
539 00 Recovery Act Accountability and Transparency Board
542 00 Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency
573 00 Northern Border Regional Commission
575 00 National Railroad Passenger Corporation Office of Inspector General
576 00 Securities Investor Protection Corporation
579 00 Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund
580 00 Corporation for Travel Promotion
581 00 Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection
582 00 Civilian Property Realignment Board
584 00 Indian Law and Order Commission
900 Allowances
900 05 Allowances
902 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
930 Miscellaneous Receipts Below the Reporting Threshold

Table 2. Listing of Functions and Subfunctions

Function and Subfunction Code
Function and Subfunction Title
050 National Defense
051 Department of Defense-Military
053 Atomic energy defense activities
054 Defense-related activities
150 International Affairs
151 International development and humanitarian assistance
152 International security assistance
153 Conduct of foreign affairs
154 Foreign information and exchange activities
155 International financial programs
250 General Science, Space, and Technology
251 General science and basic research
252 Space flight, research, and supporting activities
270 Energy
271 Energy supply
272 Energy conservation
274 Emergency energy preparedness
276 Energy information, policy, and regulation
300 Natural Resources and Environment
301 Water resources
302 Conservation and land management
303 Recreational resources
304 Pollution control and abatement
306 Other natural resources
350 Agriculture
351 Farm income stabilization
352 Agricultural research and services
370 Commerce and Housing Credit
371 Mortgage credit
372 Postal service
373 Deposit insurance
376 Other advancement of commerce
400 Transportation
401 Ground transportation
402 Air transportation
403 Water transportation
407 Other transportation
450 Community and Regional Development
451 Community development
452 Area and regional development
453 Disaster relief and insurance
500 Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services
501 Elementary, secondary, and vocational education
502 Higher education
503 Research and general education aids
504 Training and employment
505 Other labor services
506 Social services
550 Health
551 Health care services
552 Health research and training
554 Consumer and occupational health and safety
570 Medicare
571 Medicare
600 Income Security
601 General retirement and disability insurance (excluding social security)
602 Federal employee retirement and disability
603 Unemployment compensation
604 Housing assistance
605 Food and nutrition assistance
609 Other income security
650 Social Security
651 Social security
700 Veterans Benefits and Services
701 Income security for veterans
702 Veterans education, training, and rehabilitation
703 Hospital and medical care for veterans
704 Veterans housing
705 Other veterans benefits and services
750 Administration of Justice
751 Federal law enforcement activities
752 Federal litigative and judicial activities
753 Federal correctional activities
754 Criminal justice assistance
800 General Government
801 Legislative functions
802 Executive direction and management
803 Central fiscal operations
804 General property and records management
805 Central personnel management
806 General purpose fiscal assistance
808 Other general government
809 Deductions for offsetting receipts
900 Net Interest
901 Interest on Treasury debt securities (gross)
902 Interest received by on-budget trust funds
903 Interest received by off-budget trust funds
908 Other interest
909 Other investment income
920 Allowances
921 Adjustment for Budget Control Act Caps (Security)
924 Adjustment for Budget Control Act Caps (Non-Security)
925 Future Disaster Cost
928 Other requirements
929 Placeholder for Outyear OCO Costs
950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
951 Employer share, employee retirement (on-budget)
952 Employer share, employee retirement (off-budget)
953 Rents and royalties on the Outer Continental Shelf
954 Sale of major assets
959 Other undistributed offsetting receipts

Table 3. Listing of Source Categories for Receipts

Source Category Code
Category and Subcategory Title
Source Subcategory Code
931

Individual Income Taxes

Individual Income Taxes
00
932
Corporation Income Taxes
Corporation Income Taxes
00
 
Corporation Income Taxes
Corporation Income Taxes
05
933
Social Insurance Taxes and Contributions
Employment Taxes and Contributions

05

Social Insurance Taxes and Contributions

Unemployment Insurance

10

Social Insurance Taxes and Contributions

Other Retirement Contributions

15 

934
Excise Taxes
Excise Taxes
00

Excise Taxes

Federal Fund Excise Taxes
05
 
Excise Taxes
Trust Fund Excise Taxes
10
935
Estate and Gift Taxes
Estate and Gift Taxes
00
936
Customs Duties
Custom Duties and Fees
00
937
Misc. Governmental Receipts
Misc. Governmental Receipts
00
938
Legislative Proposals
Legislative Proposals
00
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