Table of contents
  1. Neo4j Tutorial - Washington, D.C.
  2. Welcome
  3. Next Meetup in October
  4. Introductions
  5. Answer Five Questions
  6. Selected Tutorial Slides
    1. Slide 1 Neo4j Tutorial
    2. Slide 2 Introduction to Graphs
    3. Slide 3 But first..an important message..
    4. Slide 4 Charts are not Graphs!
    5. Slide 5 Leonhard Euler 1707-1783
    6. Slide 6 Konigsberg (Prussia) 1736
    7. Slide 7 Attempt to solve bridge crossing problem failed
    8. Slide 8 So what about data?
    9. Slide 9 Network graph of friends
    10. Slide10 Network graph model of friends
    11. Slide 11 Segue: Graphs in a Relational World
    12. Slide 12 Linking tables
    13. Slide 13 Complex relationships
    14. Slide 14 Nodes and Relationships
    15. Slide 15 Modeling with graphs
    16. Slide 16 Start with a whiteboard
    17. Slide 17 Add relationships
    18. Slide 18 Add properties of the relationships
    19. Slide 19 Model incrementally
    20. Slide 20 Detailed modeling
    21. Slide 21 Brief tour of Neo4j
    22. Slide 22 File structure
    23. Slide 23 Command syntax
    24. Slide 24 Neo4j Dashboard
    25. Slide 25 Neo4j Data browser
    26. Slide 26 Neo4j Console
    27. Slide 27 Introduction to Cypher
    28. Slide 28 Cypher is Neo4j's graph query language
    29. Slide 29 Characteristics of Cypher
    30. Slide 30 It's all about patterns
  7. Install and Start
    1. Command Windows
    2. Opening Dashboard
    3. Opening Data browser
    4. Opening Console
    5. Opening Indexes
    6. Opening Server info
    7. Create new visualization profile
    8. Visualization
  8. Documentation
  9. Movies Model
  10. Neo4j Cheat Sheet Version 3
    1. Sheet 1
    2. Sheet 2
    3. Sheet 3
    4. Sheet 4
    5. Text Version
      1. Read-Only Query Structure
      2. Read-Write-Return Query Structure
      3. FOREACH
      4. WITH
      5. Transactions
      6. Useful Snippets
      7. Useful Links
  11. Postcard Links
    1. Graph Database
    2. Neo4j
    3. GraphConnect
    4. Cypher
    5. Neo4j on Heroku
    6. Spring Data Neo4
    7. Case Studies
  12. Overview 2.0
  13. Neo4j Case Studies
    1. Cisco.com
    2. Cisco HMP
    3. Accenture
    4. GlassDoor
    5. Adobe
    6. SFR
    7. Duetsche Telecom
    8. Hewlett Packard
    9. Telenor
    10. Viadeo
    11. Maaii
    12. Junisphere
    13. Teachscape
    14. SevenBridges Geonomics
  14. Case Study White Paper
  15. NEXT

Tutorial

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Neo4j Tutorial - Washington, D.C.
  2. Welcome
  3. Next Meetup in October
  4. Introductions
  5. Answer Five Questions
  6. Selected Tutorial Slides
    1. Slide 1 Neo4j Tutorial
    2. Slide 2 Introduction to Graphs
    3. Slide 3 But first..an important message..
    4. Slide 4 Charts are not Graphs!
    5. Slide 5 Leonhard Euler 1707-1783
    6. Slide 6 Konigsberg (Prussia) 1736
    7. Slide 7 Attempt to solve bridge crossing problem failed
    8. Slide 8 So what about data?
    9. Slide 9 Network graph of friends
    10. Slide10 Network graph model of friends
    11. Slide 11 Segue: Graphs in a Relational World
    12. Slide 12 Linking tables
    13. Slide 13 Complex relationships
    14. Slide 14 Nodes and Relationships
    15. Slide 15 Modeling with graphs
    16. Slide 16 Start with a whiteboard
    17. Slide 17 Add relationships
    18. Slide 18 Add properties of the relationships
    19. Slide 19 Model incrementally
    20. Slide 20 Detailed modeling
    21. Slide 21 Brief tour of Neo4j
    22. Slide 22 File structure
    23. Slide 23 Command syntax
    24. Slide 24 Neo4j Dashboard
    25. Slide 25 Neo4j Data browser
    26. Slide 26 Neo4j Console
    27. Slide 27 Introduction to Cypher
    28. Slide 28 Cypher is Neo4j's graph query language
    29. Slide 29 Characteristics of Cypher
    30. Slide 30 It's all about patterns
  7. Install and Start
    1. Command Windows
    2. Opening Dashboard
    3. Opening Data browser
    4. Opening Console
    5. Opening Indexes
    6. Opening Server info
    7. Create new visualization profile
    8. Visualization
  8. Documentation
  9. Movies Model
  10. Neo4j Cheat Sheet Version 3
    1. Sheet 1
    2. Sheet 2
    3. Sheet 3
    4. Sheet 4
    5. Text Version
      1. Read-Only Query Structure
      2. Read-Write-Return Query Structure
      3. FOREACH
      4. WITH
      5. Transactions
      6. Useful Snippets
      7. Useful Links
  11. Postcard Links
    1. Graph Database
    2. Neo4j
    3. GraphConnect
    4. Cypher
    5. Neo4j on Heroku
    6. Spring Data Neo4
    7. Case Studies
  12. Overview 2.0
  13. Neo4j Case Studies
    1. Cisco.com
    2. Cisco HMP
    3. Accenture
    4. GlassDoor
    5. Adobe
    6. SFR
    7. Duetsche Telecom
    8. Hewlett Packard
    9. Telenor
    10. Viadeo
    11. Maaii
    12. Junisphere
    13. Teachscape
    14. SevenBridges Geonomics
  14. Case Study White Paper
  15. NEXT

  1. Neo4j Tutorial - Washington, D.C.
  2. Welcome
  3. Next Meetup in October
  4. Introductions
  5. Answer Five Questions
  6. Selected Tutorial Slides
    1. Slide 1 Neo4j Tutorial
    2. Slide 2 Introduction to Graphs
    3. Slide 3 But first..an important message..
    4. Slide 4 Charts are not Graphs!
    5. Slide 5 Leonhard Euler 1707-1783
    6. Slide 6 Konigsberg (Prussia) 1736
    7. Slide 7 Attempt to solve bridge crossing problem failed
    8. Slide 8 So what about data?
    9. Slide 9 Network graph of friends
    10. Slide10 Network graph model of friends
    11. Slide 11 Segue: Graphs in a Relational World
    12. Slide 12 Linking tables
    13. Slide 13 Complex relationships
    14. Slide 14 Nodes and Relationships
    15. Slide 15 Modeling with graphs
    16. Slide 16 Start with a whiteboard
    17. Slide 17 Add relationships
    18. Slide 18 Add properties of the relationships
    19. Slide 19 Model incrementally
    20. Slide 20 Detailed modeling
    21. Slide 21 Brief tour of Neo4j
    22. Slide 22 File structure
    23. Slide 23 Command syntax
    24. Slide 24 Neo4j Dashboard
    25. Slide 25 Neo4j Data browser
    26. Slide 26 Neo4j Console
    27. Slide 27 Introduction to Cypher
    28. Slide 28 Cypher is Neo4j's graph query language
    29. Slide 29 Characteristics of Cypher
    30. Slide 30 It's all about patterns
  7. Install and Start
    1. Command Windows
    2. Opening Dashboard
    3. Opening Data browser
    4. Opening Console
    5. Opening Indexes
    6. Opening Server info
    7. Create new visualization profile
    8. Visualization
  8. Documentation
  9. Movies Model
  10. Neo4j Cheat Sheet Version 3
    1. Sheet 1
    2. Sheet 2
    3. Sheet 3
    4. Sheet 4
    5. Text Version
      1. Read-Only Query Structure
      2. Read-Write-Return Query Structure
      3. FOREACH
      4. WITH
      5. Transactions
      6. Useful Snippets
      7. Useful Links
  11. Postcard Links
    1. Graph Database
    2. Neo4j
    3. GraphConnect
    4. Cypher
    5. Neo4j on Heroku
    6. Spring Data Neo4
    7. Case Studies
  12. Overview 2.0
  13. Neo4j Case Studies
    1. Cisco.com
    2. Cisco HMP
    3. Accenture
    4. GlassDoor
    5. Adobe
    6. SFR
    7. Duetsche Telecom
    8. Hewlett Packard
    9. Telenor
    10. Viadeo
    11. Maaii
    12. Junisphere
    13. Teachscape
    14. SevenBridges Geonomics
  14. Case Study White Paper
  15. NEXT

Neo4j Tutorial - Washington, D.C.

Source: http://info.neotechnology.com/0828-dc-register.html

Wednesday August 28 09:00-17:00 EDT

This tutorial covers the core functionality of the Neo4j graph database. With a mixture of theory and hands-on practice sessions, attendees will quickly learn how easy it is to develop a Neo4j-backed application. You will leave with an understanding of graph databases, when to use them, and how to get started working with Neo4j.

Topics covered include:

  • Introduction to Neo4j, from installation to basic operation
  • Fundamentals of graph modeling
  • Querying, creating and updating with the Cypher query language
  • A survey of real-world use cases
  • Opportunity to consult on current projects, possible implementations and proof of concepts

Attendees won't need any previous experience with Neo4j, NOSQL databases or specific development languages, but will need their own laptop with Neo4j installed.

The tutorial will be held at ÜberOffices in Rosslyn, VA. Breakfast, lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Instructor

Wes Freeman, Software Engineer, Information Analysis Inc.

Wes Freeman

Wes Freeman is an experienced software engineer, excited about graph databases – especially the Cypher query language, to which he is a community contributor. He created the AnormCypher Neo4j "driver" for Scala. He is the top answerer on StackOverflow for Cypher-tagged questions, and runs a Cypher-oriented blog with tutorials and examples, as well as the twitter bot @neoquestions. Wes is also the DC/Baltimore Graph Database meetup group organizer.

 

Wes works at Information Analysis Inc. (a recently added Neo Technology partner). He's so enthusiastic about Neo4j that his wife even made him a birthday cake with the Neo4j logo and some Cypher syntax on it.

 

Welcome

1. Find a Seat. Say hi!

2. Grab a USB key and plug it in

3. Run "Install Neo4j" application (mac or Windows)

    When you see the README and the command prompt, your'e ready.

4. Grab a coffee and get ready to begin!

Next Meetup in October

Past Meetups

Tom Rindfleasch @ Natural Language Processing and Big Data, April 23, Data Science DC

Resources and Readings for Big Data Week DC Events

Thomas Rindflesch recommends several papers related to his work on Semantic MEDLINE, including:

My Note: See My Semantic Medline

Introductions

My Note: See emails on the board

Wes Freeman, Fairfax, @wesfreema, wfreeman@infoa.com

Mark Hooker

Brand Niemann

?

Jason Alden

Loren Page

MIchael Joseph, Prime Dimensions, Partner 

Lowell Vizonor 

Richard Rowan

?

?

Answer Five Questions

Slides: PDF

1. What is Neo4j?

2. Why would I use it?

3. How do I model data?

4. How do I enter data?

5. How do I query data?

Build an application at home

Euler: Konigsberg Bridges crossing problem

See Tweet: No solution exists

SQL and RDBMS - requires multiple key tables to cross-walk

Start with a Whiteboard for Graph Modeling

Selected Tutorial Slides

Source: PDF

Slide 1 Neo4j Tutorial

Neo4jTutorialSlide1.png

Slide 2 Introduction to Graphs

Neo4jTutorialSlide2.png

Slide 3 But first..an important message..

Neo4jTutorialSlide3.png

Slide 4 Charts are not Graphs!

Neo4jTutorialSlide4.png

Slide 5 Leonhard Euler 1707-1783

Neo4jTutorialSlide5.png

Slide 6 Konigsberg (Prussia) 1736

Neo4jTutorialSlide6.png

Slide 7 Attempt to solve bridge crossing problem failed

Neo4jTutorialSlide7.png

Slide 8 So what about data?

Neo4jTutorialSlide8.png

Slide 9 Network graph of friends

Neo4jTutorialSlide9.png

Slide10 Network graph model of friends

Neo4jTutorialSlide10.png

Slide 11 Segue: Graphs in a Relational World

Neo4jTutorialSlide11.png

Slide 12 Linking tables

Neo4jTutorialSlide12.png

Slide 13 Complex relationships

Neo4jTutorialSlide13.png

Slide 14 Nodes and Relationships

Neo4jTutorialSlide14.png

Slide 15 Modeling with graphs

Neo4jTutorialSlide15.png

Slide 16 Start with a whiteboard

Neo4jTutorialSlide16.png

Slide 17 Add relationships

Neo4jTutorialSlide17.png

Slide 18 Add properties of the relationships

Neo4jTutorialSlide18.png

Slide 19 Model incrementally

Neo4jTutorialSlide19.png

Slide 20 Detailed modeling

Neo4jTutorialSlide20.png

Slide 21 Brief tour of Neo4j

Neo4jTutorialSlide21.png

Slide 22 File structure

Neo4jTutorialSlide22.png

Slide 23 Command syntax

Neo4jTutorialSlide23.png

Slide 24 Neo4j Dashboard

Neo4jTutorialSlide24.png

Slide 25 Neo4j Data browser

Neo4jTutorialSlide25.png

Slide 26 Neo4j Console

Neo4jTutorialSlide26.png

Slide 27 Introduction to Cypher

Neo4jTutorialSlide27.png

Slide 28 Cypher is Neo4j's graph query language

Neo4jTutorialSlide28.png

Slide 29 Characteristics of Cypher

Neo4jTutorialSlide29.png

Slide 30 It's all about patterns

Neo4jTutorialSlide30.png

Install and Start

http://localhost:7474/webadmin/

bin\neo4j start

bin\neo4jshell -file sample\movies.cyp

start http://localhost:7474/

My Note: Had to install java from key

Neo4j (CSV) Batch Importer:  https://github.com/jexp/batch-import My Note: Try this.

Command Windows

CommandNodesCreated1.png

 

CommandNodesCreated2.png

Opening Dashboard

Neo4jLocalHostOpeningDashboard.png

Opening Data browser

Neo4jLocalHostOpeningDatabrowser.png

Opening Console

Neo4jLocalHostOpeningConsole.png

Opening Indexes

Neo4jLocalHostOpeningIndexes.png

Opening Server info

Neo4jLocalHostOpeningServerinfo.png

Create new visualization profile

Neo4jCreateNewVisualizationProfile.png

Visualization

Neo4jCreateNewVisualizationProfile1.png

Movies Model

Source: PDF

MoviesModel.png

Neo4j Cheat Sheet Version 3

Source: PDF My Note: See Text Version Below For Clarity

Sheet 1

Neo4jCheatSheetPage1.png

Sheet 2

Neo4jCheatSheetPage2.png

Sheet 3

Neo4jCheatSheetPage3.png

Sheet 4

Neo4jCheatSheetPage4.png

Text Version

Cypher is the declarative query language for Neo4j, the world’s leading graph database.
 
- Cypher matches patterns of nodes and relationship in the graph, to extract information or modify the data.

- Cypher has the concept of identifiers which denoted named, bound elements and parameters,

- Cypher can mutate graph data by creating, updating, and removing nodes, relationships, and properties,

You can try cypher snippets live in the Neo4j Console at: http://console.neo4j.org

Read-Only Query Structure

START me=node:people(name='Andres')
[MATCH me-[:FRIEND]->friend ]
WHERE friend.age > 18
RETURN me, friend.name
ORDER BY friend.age asc
SKIP 5 LIMIT 10
 
START meaning
START n=node(id,[id2,id3])
Load the node with id id into n
START n=node:indexName (key="value")
Query the index with an exact query and put the result into n
Use node_auto_index for the auto-index
START n=node:indexName ("lucene query")
Query the index using a full Lucene query and put the result in n
START n=node(*) Load all nodes
START m=node(1), n=node(2)
Multiple start points

 

RETURN meaning
RETURN *
Return all named nodes, relationships and identifiers
RETURN expr AS alias
Set result column name as alias
RETURN distinct expr
Return unique values for expr

 

MATCH meaning
MATCH n-->m
A pattern where n has outgoing relationships to another node, no matter relationship-type
MATCH n--m
n has relationship in either direction to m
MATCH n-[:KNOWS]->m
The outgoing relationship between n and m has to be of KNOWS relationship type
MATCH n-[:KNOWS|LOVES]-m
n has KNOWS or LOVES relationship to m
MATCH n-[r]->m
An outgoing relationship from n to m, and store the relationship in r
MATCH n-[r?]->m
The relationship is optional
MATCH n-[*1..5]->m
A multi step relationship between between n and m,
MATCH n-[*]->m
A pattern where n has a relationship to m unbound number of steps away
MATCH n-[?:KNOWS*..5]->m
An optional relationship between n and m that is of KNOWS relationship type and between one and five steps long.
MATCH n-->m<--o
A pattern with n having an outgoing relationship to m, and m having incoming relationship from o
MATCH p=n-->m<--o
Store the path going from n to o over m into the path identifier p
MATCH p = shortestPath(n-[:KNOWS*3]->m )
Find the shortest path between n and m of type KNOWS of at most length 3

Read-Write-Return Query Structure

START emil=node:people(name='Emil')
MATCH emil-[:MARRIED_TO]-madde
CREATE/CREATE UNIQUE
emil-[:DAD]->(noomi {name:"Noomi"})<-[:MOM]-madde
DELETE emil.spare_time
SET emil.happy=true
RETURN noomi
 
CREATE meaning
CREATE (n {name :"Name" })
Creates the node with the given properties
CREATE n = {map}
Create node from map parameter
CREATE n = {manyMaps}
Create many nodes from parameter with coll of maps
CREATE n-[:KNOWS]->m
Creates the relationship with the given type and dir
CREATE n-[:LOVES {since: 2007}] ->m
Creates the relationship with the given type, dir, and properties

 

DELETE meaning
DELETE n, DELETE rel
Deletes the node, relationship
DELETE n.prop Removes the property

 

CREATE UNIQUE meaning
CREATE UNIQUE n-[:KNOWS]->m
Tries to match the pattern. Creates the missing pieces if the match fails
CREATE UNIQUE n-[:KNOWS]->(m {name:"Name"})
Tries to match a node with the property name set to "Name". Createsthe node  and sets the property if it can’t be found.
CREATE UNIQUE n-[:LOVES {since: 2007}] ->m
Tries to find the relationship with the given type, direction, and attributes. Creates it if not found.

 

SET meaning
SET n.prop = value
Updates or creates the property prop with the given value
SET n = {map}
Updates the properties with the given map parameter
SET n.prop = null Deletes the property prop

 

Predicates meaning
NOT pred1 AND/OR pred2
Boolean operators for predicates
ALL(x in coll: pred)
TRUE if pred is TRUE for all values in coll
ANY(x in coll : pred)
TRUE if pred is TRUE for at least one value in coll
NONE(x in coll : pred)
TRUE if pred returns FALSE for all values in coll
SINGLE(x in coll : pred)
TRUE if pred returns TRUE for a single value in coll
identifier IS NULL TRUE if identifier is <NULL>
n.prop? = value
TRUE if n.prop = value or n is NULL or n.prop does not exist
n.prop! = value
TRUE if n.prop = valueFALSE if n is NULL or n.prop does not exist
n.prop! = value
TRUE if n.prop = value,FALSE if n is NULL or n.prop does not exist
n =~ /regexp/ Regular expression
e1 <> e2
e1 < e2
e1 = e2
Comparison operators
has(n.prop) Checks if property exists
n-[:TYPE]->m
Filter on existence of relationship
expr IN coll
Checks for existence of expr in coll

 

Expressions meaning
a-zA-Z0-9_
or
'some na-me'
Allowed  identifier (or quoted)
n + / - * % m
Arithmetic operators "+" also works on strings and collections
n.prop, n.prop?
 Property on node, property on node, orNULL if missing
[42,"Hello",'World',{p}] A collection
{param}
Parameter value, passed into the query execution as map
{ param : "value",... }
a-->()<--b A path-pattern

 

Functions meaning
HEAD(coll)
First element of coll
TAIL(coll)
coll except first element
LAST(coll)
Last element of coll
TYPE(rel)
Relationship type of rel
ID(node)
ID(relationship)
Id of node or relationship
COALESCE(expr,default)
Returns default if expr is NULL otherwise expr
RANGE(start,end[,step])
Creates a range from start to end (inclusive) with a optional step
ABS(v)
ROUND(v)
SQRT(v)
SIGN(v)
Math functions

 

Path Functions meaning
NODES(path) Returns the nodes in path
RELS(path)
Returns the relationships in path
LENGTH(path) Returns the length of path

 

Aggregate Functions meaning
  NULL values in expr
COUNT(*)
Returns the number of values aggregated over
SUM(expr)
Returns the sum of all values in expr Throws exception for non-numeric values
AVG(expr)
Returns the average of all values in expr
MAX(expr)
Returns the largest value in expr
MIN(expr)
Returns the smallest values in expr
COLLECT(expr)
Returns an coll containing all values in expr
FILTER( x in coll : predicate )
Returns a all the elements in coll that match the given predicate
EXTRACT( x in coll : expr)
Applies the expr once for every element in coll

FOREACH

FOREACH is used to execute a mutating operation for each element of a collection, e.g. creating a node for each element using the element as an attribute value.
 
START user=node:users("name:A*"),
promotion=node(...)
MATCH user-[:FRIEND]-friend-[:FRIEND]-foaf
WITH user, collect(distinct foaf) as new_friends

WITH

WITH syntax is similar to RETURN. It separates query parts explicity, allowing you to declare whih identifiers to carry over to the next part. This can be used to limit the visible identifiers but mostly for creating aggregate values that can be used in the next query part either for filtering (implemeting HAVING) or for the creation of new structures in the graph.
 
WITH also creates a boundary between reading and updating query parts so that they don't interfere.
 
START user=node:users("name:A*")
MATCH user-[:FRIEND]-friend
WITH user, count(friend) as friends
WHERE friends > 10
RETURN user
 
START user=node:users("name:A*")
MATCH user-[:FRIEND]-friend
WITH user, count(friend) as friends
SET user.numberOfFriends = friends

Transactions

The Neo4j-Shell supports commands to begin transactions, which allows you to issue multiple commands and then only commit them when you're satisified and rollback if you raun into an issue or don't want your changes to happen.
 
neo4j-sh (0)$ begin
==> Transaction started
neo4j-sh (0)$ rollback
==> Transaction rolled back
neo4j-sh (0)$ commit
==> Transaction committed

Useful Snippets

START n=node(...)
MATCH n-->m-->o
WHERE not ( n-->o )
RETURN o
Not already connected to
This returns nodes that m is connected to, that n is not already connected to.
START n=node(...)
MATCH path = n-[*]-n
RETURN n, length(path)
Find cycles
This returns nodes that m is connected to, that n is not already connected to.
START n=node(...)
MATCH n-[r]-m
RETURN type(r), count(*)
Group count relationship types
Returns a count of each of the relationship-types.
START n=node(...)
MATCH n-[r?]-()
DELETE n,r
Delete node with relationships
Finds the node and all relationships (if any) and deletes node and
relationships.
START n = node(1), m =
node(2) RETURN n.name
+" and "+ m.name
String concat on expressions

Useful Links

Cypher Screencast: http://bit.ly/cypher-stanley
 
Cypher Reference Manual: http://bit.ly/cypher-reference
 
Cypher Presentation: http://bitly/cypher-slide

Overview 2.0

Labels!

Indexing overhaul (to support tables)

Cypher syntax (to support labels and indexes)

Transactional endpoint for Cypher

Other cool stuff... CASE/When, MERGE, UNION

Neo4j Case Studies

My Note: Screen Captures from Tutorial Slides (PDF)

Cisco.com

Industry: Communications
Use case: Recommendations
Neo4jCaseStudySlide1.png

Cisco HMP

Industry: Communications
Use case: Master Data Management
Neo4jCaseStudySlide2.png

Accenture

Industry: Logistics
Use case: Parcel Routing
Neo4jCaseStudySlide3.png

GlassDoor

Industry: Online Job Search
Use case: Social / Recommendations
Neo4jCaseStudySlide4.png

Adobe

Industry: Web/ISV
Use case: Content Management, Social, Access Control
Neo4jCaseStudySlide5.png

SFR

Industry: Communications
Use case: Network Management
Neo4jCaseStudySlide6.png

Duetsche Telecom

Industry: Communications
Use case: Social gaming
Neo4jCaseStudySlide7.png

Hewlett Packard

Industry: Web/ISV, Communications
Use case: Network Management
Neo4jCaseStudySlide8.png

Telenor

Industry: Communications
Use case: Resource Authorization & Access Control
Neo4jCaseStudySlide9.png

Viadeo

Industry: Professional Social Network
Use case: Social, Recommendations
Neo4jCaseStudySlide10.png

Maaii

Industry: Communications
Use case: Social, Mobile
Neo4jCaseStudySlide11.png

Junisphere

Industry: Web/ISV, Communications
Use case: Data Center Management
Neo4jCaseStudySlide12.png

Teachscape

Industry: Education
Use case: Resource Authorization & Access Control
Neo4jCaseStudySlide13.png

SevenBridges Geonomics

Industry: Life Sciences
Use case: Content Management
Neo4jCaseStudySlide14.png

Case Study White Paper

Source: PDF
Neo4jCaseStudyICE.png

NEXT

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