Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. HHS Welcomes a New Surge of Talent to Solve Some of the Biggest Challenges in Health Care and Government
    1. Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information
    2. Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why
    3. Modernizing CDC Mortality Data & Analytic Tools
    4. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases
    5. About the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program
  3. Tune into the HHS IDEA Lab's Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Day November 13, 2014
  4. Tell us what you think: How can we use technology to reach the under-served?
  5. Story
  6. Media Advisory
  7. What is the HHS IDEA Lab?
  8. The HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank & Demo Day
    1. The Panelists (Our ‘Sharks’)
    2. Presentations
      1. Improving Access to Health Care Using a Fast Track System
      2. Revisiting an Annual Report to Congress
      3. Student Loan Data Sharing with the Department of Education
      4. Upgrading the Genetic Variable Search
      5. Enhancing CMS Outreach with Coordination Solutions
      6. Resourcing Community Ideas Regionally
      7. The CDC Open Idea Lab
      8. GINAS: Advancing FDA's Ingredient Information System
      9. Automatic X-Ray Screening for Rural Areas
      10. Fostering Scientific Insight through Data Federation
      11. Increasing NIH Clinical Center Research Interns and Internships
    3. In the afternoon, it'll be more casual.
  9. HHS Ignite Application
    1. Eligibility
    2. We Begin Accepting Proposals Again in October, 2014
    3. Interested in Applying?
    4. The Scoring Criteria and Selection Process
  10. Story
    1. Data Dictionary
    2. People
    3. Projects
    4. Blogs
    5. Linked Data Publication in a Data Browser
  11. Slides
    1. Slide 1 HHS IDEA LAB
    2. Slide 2 Data Science for the HHS IDEA LAB Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 3 Spreadsheet Knowledge Base 1
    4. Slide 4 Spreadsheet Knowledge Base 2
    5. Slide 5 Spreadsheet People
    6. Slide 6 Spreadsheet Projects
    7. Slide 7 Spreadsheet Blogs
    8. Slide 8 Spotfire Cover Page
    9. Slide 9 Spotfire Data Ecosystem
    10. Slide 10 Health, United States, 2013 (in process)
  12. Spotfire Dashboard
  13. Research Notes
  14. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases Fellowship
  15. HDC Webinar: The HHS HDI Strategy & Execution Plan
  16. The New HHS Health Data Strategy and Execution Plan
    1. HDI Strategic Goals
  17. HHS IDEA LAB
    1. About the Lab
    2. The People
      1. HHS IDEA Lab Staff
        1. Lucky,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        2. Cassandra Duarte,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        3. Julie Herron, HHS IDEA Lab
        4. Sandeep Patel,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        5. Will Yang, HHS IDEA Lab
        6. Damon Davis, HHS IDEA Lab
        7. Elizabeth Kittrie, HHS IDEA Lab
        8. Bryan Sivak, HHS IDEA Lab
        9. Read Holman, HHS IDEA Lab
        10. Steven Randazzo, HHS IDEA Lab
        11. Greg Downing, HHS IDEA Lab
      2. People: HHS Entrepreneurs
        1. Chris Lunt, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        2. Frank Sanborn, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
        3. Kevin Larsen, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT
        4. Amy Sherwood, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        5. Mindy Hangsleben, ONC for Health IT
        6. Zachery Jiwa, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        7. David Cartier, Health Resources and Services Administration
      3. People: HHS Innovates
        1. Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living
        2. Claro Yu, National Institutes of Health
        3. Debra J. Grabowski, Indian Health Service
        4. Eric S. Weiss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        5. Gwen Shinko, National Institutes of Health
        6. Ivor D’Souza, National Institutes of Health
        7. James Onken, National Institutes of Health
        8. Joyce E. B. Backus, National Institutes of Health
        9. Juliette S. Kendrick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        10. Kathy Slawson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        11. Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service
        12. Lynn Sokler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        13. Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health
        14. Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration
        15. Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health
        16. Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration
        17. Richard Schieber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        18. Stacey Mattison, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        19. Manuel B. Datiles III, National Institutes of Health
      4. People: HHS Innovator-in-Residence
        1. Nag Murty, West Health / IDEA Lab
        2. Pierce Graham-Jones, ​HHS IDEA Lab
      5. People: Presidential Innovation Fellows
        1. Adam Dole, ONC for Health IT
        2. Nayan Jain, ONC for Health IT
        3. Sean Herron, Food and Drug Administration
      6. People: Sammies
        1. Julie Segre, National Institutes of Health
        2. Nora D. Volkow, National Institutes of Health
        3. Tara Palmore, National Institutes of Health
        4. Hamid Jafari, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        5. Michael Gottesman, National Institutes of Health
        6. J. Todd Weber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    3. The Projects
      1. Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      2. Anti-Cancer Research
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      3. Application of Design Thinking to Grants
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      4. Automate Blue Button Initiative
      5. Blue Button Project
        1. Presidential Innovation Fellows
        2. More information on the Blue Button Initiative
      6. Bridging the CHASM of Health Disparities
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      7. Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      8. Building Health Resilience Technology to Withstand Natural Disasters
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
      9. CDCOLOGY: A Microtasking Project
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. TEAM MEMBERS
        4. Additional Information
      10. Cloud-Based GIS Maps Displaying Aggregate Data on Medical Malpractice
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      11. CMS Coordinated Press Response Strategy
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. TEAM MEMBERS
        4. Additional Information
      12. Connecting Kids with Dental Care
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      13. Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      14. Creating De-Identified Claims Data
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION: 
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS 
      15. Creating a Polio-Free World
      16. Data-Driven Website Optimization Using Multivariate Testing
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      17. Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      18. Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why?
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
      19. Developing a Data-Driven ACF Workforce
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      20. Education Through Wireless SMS
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      21. Electronic Health Records in Action
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      22. Electronic Patient Tracking in Disasters
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
      23. Electronic Tracking & Transport of the Nation’s Organ Transplant System
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      24. Fast-Screening CE-MS Method for Bacteria Through Protein Pattern Recognition
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. IMAGES
      25. FDA-iRISK: A Fast Tool for Food Safety
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. RELATED FACT SHEETS
      26. FDA-TRACK Gallery Submissions
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS  
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      27. FDA’s Anti-Counterfeit Device
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED ARTICLES
        4. RELATED PICTURES
      28. Forming Partnerships to Develop Lifesaving Technologies
      29. From Outer Space to the Eye Clinic
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED PUBLICATION
      30. Getting more out of Video: NLM Video Search
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      31. Health Data Consortium Affiliates Network
      32. Health Information Exchange Accelerators
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      33. Healthcare Practitioner Credentialing Portal
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS 
      34. IHS Workforce Development: Going Lean to Understand Needs
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      35. Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information
      36. Improving Health & Stability in Food Choices
      37. Increasing Efficiency in Rule Making with Natural Language Processing
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Product Summary
        3. Team Members
      38. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. INTERNAL ENTREPRENRURS
      39. Integrating Health Insurance Marketplace Data to Visualize Efforts and Impact
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      40. Joining Forces to Fight Childhood Obesity
        1. TEAM MEMERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      41. Leveraging the Public to Catch Fugitives
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      42. Lighting the Way: NIOSH Cap Lamp
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      43. Making the Link Between Public Health & Aging
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      44. MedlinePlus Connect
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      45. Million Hearts Initiative
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITE
      46. Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools
      47. Modernizing the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      48. MONAHRQ – My Own Network, powered by AHRQ
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      49. Moving Drug Addiction Science into the Mainstream
      50. Moving Towards Energy Efficient NIH Laboratories
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      51. NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      52. NIH RePORT: Public Access to Research
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      53. Online Food Handler Training Project
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      54. openFDA
        1. Presidential Innovation Fellow: Sean Herron
        2. More information on openFDA
      55. Stopping a Fungal Meningitis Outbreak
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      56. Piloting Green Laboratories
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      57. Superbug Code Breakers
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      58. Portal System: Linking Healthcare Clinics
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      59. Supporting Tribal Grantees: ACF Makes it Simple
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      60. Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      61. The 100k Genome Project
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      62. Publication Planning & Clearance Process Improvement Project
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      63. The Body Weight Simulator
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      64. The CDC Health Game Jam 2013
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      65. Ready, Cert, Go!
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      66. The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      67. Project Boundary
        1. BACKGROUND
        2. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
          1. HOW DOES THE SYSTEM WORK?
          2. THE BEACONS AS A ONE-WAY TRANSMITTER
          3. THE PHONE AS A RECEIVER
        3. POTENTIAL DEMOS
      68. Project Sandbox
        1. AN OVERVIEW
        2. OUR FIRST FOCUS AREA: HOME-BASED PRIMARY CARE OF THE FRAIL ELDERLY.
          1. THE PROBLEM AND UNDERSERVED NEED
          2. BARRIERS TO PRIMARY CARE
          3. THE HOUSE CALL MODEL – A POTENTIAL SOLUTION & KEY OUTCOMES
        3. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
      69. The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge
      70. Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR)
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      71. The National Database for Autism Research
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      72. Revolutionizing Procurement Through the Web
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      73. The National Health Service Corps Job Center
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      74. The NIH 3D Print Exchange
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      75. The NLM Pillbox: More Efficient Data Cleanup and Outputs
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      76. The Weight of the Nation Campaign
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
    4. Our Pathways
      1. HHS Innovates
      2. HHS Entrepreneurs
      3. HHS Innovator-In-Residence
      4. HHS Ignite
      5. HHS Ventures​
      6. HHS Competes​
      7. IDEA Lab Sponsored Projects
      8. HHS Connects
      9. HHS Health Data Initiative
    5. The Blog
      1. WHY THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD HIRE MORE PRODUCT PEOPLE
      2. APPLY NOW! HHS ENTREPRENEURS IS BACK AND LOOKING FOR TALENT!
      3. INNOVATING TO TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE
      4. CALLING ALL CODERS! CODE-A-PALOOZA SUBMISSIONS NOW OPEN
      5. PERSONALLY-GENERATED HEALTH DATA – THE NEXT FRONTIER
      6. HHS IDEA LAB @ SXSW
      7. HHS IGNITE: NOW ACCEPTING YOUR FUNDING PROPOSALS!
      8. COME JOIN THE HHS IDEA LAB TEAM! APPLY TO BE THE NEXT HEALTH DATA INNOVATOR
      9. HHS IGNITE INNOVATION DAY: JOIN US THIS FRIDAY!
      10. DATA FUELING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH CARE TRANSFORMATION
      11. PRA: THE GOVERNMENT’S MILLION DOLLAR SURVEY?
      12. PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH
      13. DATA.CDC.GOV: ENERGIZING DATA TO BETTER TELL THE STORY
      14. NOW SOLICITING FEEDBACK ON THE STRATEGIC VISION FOR INNOVATION AT THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
      15. HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE SELECTED TEAMS & THE BANK OF IDEAS
      16. NOW OPEN! APPLY TO WORK ON HIGH IMPACT PROJECTS IN 2ND ANNUAL TALENT SEARCH FOR THE HHSENTREPRENEURS PROGRAM
      17. HEALTH DATAPALOOZA IV TOPS OFF A HUGE YEAR IN HEALTH DATA LIBERATION & INNOVATION
      18. MR. POTATOHEAD MEETS THE SECRETARY!!!
      19. HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE WHAT’S AND WHY’S OF YOUR PROPOSAL
      20. HHSIGNITES (BETA): AN INNOVATION SEED-FUNDING OPPORTUNITY
      21. INNOVATION AND EXPERIMENTATION GOING VIRAL AT HHS
      22. HHSINNOVATES PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD, VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE
      23. COMMUNITY RESILIENCY
      24. INNOVATION: LIVING SOCIAL PROCESS
      25. THE LEAN VIRUS HAS HIT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT…. KAIZEN!
      26. INNOVATION 101
      27. YOU DON’T TRACK WHAT?
      28. MAP IT LIKE IT’S HOT!!
      29. WELCOME TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT!
      30. WHAT A PICTURE IS WORTH
      31. JUMPING IN FEET LAST
      32. ROUND FIVE OF HHSINNOVATES CONCLUDES & LESSONS LEARNED
      33. INNOVATION FELLOWS TECHNICAL ADVISORS: IMPORTANT COMPONENTS TO THE HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM
      34. FIRST-TIME PUBLIC VOTING FOR TOP HEALTH INNOVATIONS AT HHS, VOTE NOW!
      35. NEW DIGITAL GOVERNMENT STRATEGY MAKES INFORMATION MORE USEFUL AND DYNAMIC
      36. NEW INNOVATION OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCED! – HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM
      37. ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS ROCK 3RD ANNUAL HEALTH DATAPALOOZA
      38. THE GROWING ROLE FOR MOBILE PHONES IN PUBLIC HEALTH
      39. HEALTH TECHTALK
      40. WE’RE LAUNCHING HHS’ NEW OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN, VERSION 2.0
      41. PROTECTING PRIVACY AND BUILDING TRUST AS MOBILE AND ONLINE HEALTH EVOLVE
      42. TWO NEW WAYS FOR YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT
      43. OBAMA ADMINISTRATION AND TEXT4BABY JOIN FORCES TO CONNECT PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN TO HEALTH COVERAGE AND INFORMATION
      44. MHEALTH INNOVATION AND DEVELOPERS CHALLENGES
      45. CELEBRATING INNOVATIVE HEALTH PROMOTION APPS – WINNERS OF THE SG CHALLENGE
      46. HELP US DEVELOP OUR NEW OPEN GOV PLAN
      47. MHEALTH RESEARCH & EVALUATION: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
      48. U.S. SURGEON GENERAL’S HEALTHY APP CHALLENGE
      49. COMPLEXITIES AND CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPING MHEALTH PROGRAMS
      50. CELEBRATING INNOVATION! APPS CHALLENGE WINNERS AT THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE
      51. ANNOUNCING THE LEADING HEALTH INDICATORS APPS CHALLENGE
      52. THREE APPROACHES TO MHEALTH
      53. PROMOTING A “THINK DIFFERENTLY” ATTITUDE AT HHS
      54. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CELEBRATES THE UNITED STATES’ ENTRY INTO THE OPEN GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP
      55. ADVANCING TEXT MESSAGING FOR HEALTH
      56. NEW YORK INCREASES ACCESS TO HEALTH DATA
      57. THE POWER OF MANY: CROWDSOURCING OUR WAY TO SOLUTIONS
      58. JUNE 2011 OPEN GOVERNMENT PROGRESS REPORT RELEASE
      59. CALLING ALL HEALTH INNOVATORS: HEALTH DATA PALOOZA LIVE JUNE 9TH
      60. GREATLY IMPROVED PUBLIC REPORTING OF HHS GRANTS DATA
      61. ADDING VALUE AT HHS THROUGH INNOVATION
      62. HELP SHAPE THE NEW FEDERAL HEALTH IT STRATEGIC PLAN
      63. CELEBRATING SUNSHINE WEEK AT HHS
      64. WELCOME TO HEALTHDATA.GOV!
      65. ADVANCING A CULTURE OF INNOVATION AT HHS
      66. THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE’S NEW API PORTAL
      67. HHSINNOVATES AWARDS PROGRAM
      68. STRATEGIC PLAN
      69. NOW PLAYING: NEW DEVELOPER CHALLENGES USING HEALTH DATA!
      70. HHS'S OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN: VERSION 1.1
      71. SECRETARY’S INNOVATION AWARDS PROGRAM – HHSINNOVATES!
      72. HHS AND INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE PROMOTE COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA INITIATIVE
      73. COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA FORUM: HARNESSING THE POWER OF INFORMATION TO IMPROVE HEALTH
      74. DESIGN FOR AMERICA – VISUALIZING HEALTH DATA TO INSPIRE COMMUNITY ACTION
      75. SECRETARY KATHLEEN SEBELIUS’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY
      76. HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN
      77. FOLKS HAVE POSTED TERRIFIC OPEN GOVERNMENT THOUGHTS
      78. OPEN GOVERNMENT IS POWERED BY YOU
      79. GETTING STARTED
  18. NEXT​

Data Science for the HHS IDEA LAB

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. HHS Welcomes a New Surge of Talent to Solve Some of the Biggest Challenges in Health Care and Government
    1. Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information
    2. Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why
    3. Modernizing CDC Mortality Data & Analytic Tools
    4. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases
    5. About the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program
  3. Tune into the HHS IDEA Lab's Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Day November 13, 2014
  4. Tell us what you think: How can we use technology to reach the under-served?
  5. Story
  6. Media Advisory
  7. What is the HHS IDEA Lab?
  8. The HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank & Demo Day
    1. The Panelists (Our ‘Sharks’)
    2. Presentations
      1. Improving Access to Health Care Using a Fast Track System
      2. Revisiting an Annual Report to Congress
      3. Student Loan Data Sharing with the Department of Education
      4. Upgrading the Genetic Variable Search
      5. Enhancing CMS Outreach with Coordination Solutions
      6. Resourcing Community Ideas Regionally
      7. The CDC Open Idea Lab
      8. GINAS: Advancing FDA's Ingredient Information System
      9. Automatic X-Ray Screening for Rural Areas
      10. Fostering Scientific Insight through Data Federation
      11. Increasing NIH Clinical Center Research Interns and Internships
    3. In the afternoon, it'll be more casual.
  9. HHS Ignite Application
    1. Eligibility
    2. We Begin Accepting Proposals Again in October, 2014
    3. Interested in Applying?
    4. The Scoring Criteria and Selection Process
  10. Story
    1. Data Dictionary
    2. People
    3. Projects
    4. Blogs
    5. Linked Data Publication in a Data Browser
  11. Slides
    1. Slide 1 HHS IDEA LAB
    2. Slide 2 Data Science for the HHS IDEA LAB Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 3 Spreadsheet Knowledge Base 1
    4. Slide 4 Spreadsheet Knowledge Base 2
    5. Slide 5 Spreadsheet People
    6. Slide 6 Spreadsheet Projects
    7. Slide 7 Spreadsheet Blogs
    8. Slide 8 Spotfire Cover Page
    9. Slide 9 Spotfire Data Ecosystem
    10. Slide 10 Health, United States, 2013 (in process)
  12. Spotfire Dashboard
  13. Research Notes
  14. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases Fellowship
  15. HDC Webinar: The HHS HDI Strategy & Execution Plan
  16. The New HHS Health Data Strategy and Execution Plan
    1. HDI Strategic Goals
  17. HHS IDEA LAB
    1. About the Lab
    2. The People
      1. HHS IDEA Lab Staff
        1. Lucky,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        2. Cassandra Duarte,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        3. Julie Herron, HHS IDEA Lab
        4. Sandeep Patel,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        5. Will Yang, HHS IDEA Lab
        6. Damon Davis, HHS IDEA Lab
        7. Elizabeth Kittrie, HHS IDEA Lab
        8. Bryan Sivak, HHS IDEA Lab
        9. Read Holman, HHS IDEA Lab
        10. Steven Randazzo, HHS IDEA Lab
        11. Greg Downing, HHS IDEA Lab
      2. People: HHS Entrepreneurs
        1. Chris Lunt, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        2. Frank Sanborn, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
        3. Kevin Larsen, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT
        4. Amy Sherwood, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        5. Mindy Hangsleben, ONC for Health IT
        6. Zachery Jiwa, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        7. David Cartier, Health Resources and Services Administration
      3. People: HHS Innovates
        1. Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living
        2. Claro Yu, National Institutes of Health
        3. Debra J. Grabowski, Indian Health Service
        4. Eric S. Weiss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        5. Gwen Shinko, National Institutes of Health
        6. Ivor D’Souza, National Institutes of Health
        7. James Onken, National Institutes of Health
        8. Joyce E. B. Backus, National Institutes of Health
        9. Juliette S. Kendrick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        10. Kathy Slawson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        11. Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service
        12. Lynn Sokler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        13. Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health
        14. Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration
        15. Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health
        16. Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration
        17. Richard Schieber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        18. Stacey Mattison, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        19. Manuel B. Datiles III, National Institutes of Health
      4. People: HHS Innovator-in-Residence
        1. Nag Murty, West Health / IDEA Lab
        2. Pierce Graham-Jones, ​HHS IDEA Lab
      5. People: Presidential Innovation Fellows
        1. Adam Dole, ONC for Health IT
        2. Nayan Jain, ONC for Health IT
        3. Sean Herron, Food and Drug Administration
      6. People: Sammies
        1. Julie Segre, National Institutes of Health
        2. Nora D. Volkow, National Institutes of Health
        3. Tara Palmore, National Institutes of Health
        4. Hamid Jafari, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        5. Michael Gottesman, National Institutes of Health
        6. J. Todd Weber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    3. The Projects
      1. Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      2. Anti-Cancer Research
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      3. Application of Design Thinking to Grants
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      4. Automate Blue Button Initiative
      5. Blue Button Project
        1. Presidential Innovation Fellows
        2. More information on the Blue Button Initiative
      6. Bridging the CHASM of Health Disparities
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      7. Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      8. Building Health Resilience Technology to Withstand Natural Disasters
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
      9. CDCOLOGY: A Microtasking Project
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. TEAM MEMBERS
        4. Additional Information
      10. Cloud-Based GIS Maps Displaying Aggregate Data on Medical Malpractice
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      11. CMS Coordinated Press Response Strategy
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. TEAM MEMBERS
        4. Additional Information
      12. Connecting Kids with Dental Care
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      13. Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      14. Creating De-Identified Claims Data
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION: 
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS 
      15. Creating a Polio-Free World
      16. Data-Driven Website Optimization Using Multivariate Testing
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      17. Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      18. Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why?
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
      19. Developing a Data-Driven ACF Workforce
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      20. Education Through Wireless SMS
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      21. Electronic Health Records in Action
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      22. Electronic Patient Tracking in Disasters
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
      23. Electronic Tracking & Transport of the Nation’s Organ Transplant System
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      24. Fast-Screening CE-MS Method for Bacteria Through Protein Pattern Recognition
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. IMAGES
      25. FDA-iRISK: A Fast Tool for Food Safety
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. RELATED FACT SHEETS
      26. FDA-TRACK Gallery Submissions
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS  
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      27. FDA’s Anti-Counterfeit Device
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED ARTICLES
        4. RELATED PICTURES
      28. Forming Partnerships to Develop Lifesaving Technologies
      29. From Outer Space to the Eye Clinic
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED PUBLICATION
      30. Getting more out of Video: NLM Video Search
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      31. Health Data Consortium Affiliates Network
      32. Health Information Exchange Accelerators
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      33. Healthcare Practitioner Credentialing Portal
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS 
      34. IHS Workforce Development: Going Lean to Understand Needs
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      35. Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information
      36. Improving Health & Stability in Food Choices
      37. Increasing Efficiency in Rule Making with Natural Language Processing
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Product Summary
        3. Team Members
      38. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. INTERNAL ENTREPRENRURS
      39. Integrating Health Insurance Marketplace Data to Visualize Efforts and Impact
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      40. Joining Forces to Fight Childhood Obesity
        1. TEAM MEMERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      41. Leveraging the Public to Catch Fugitives
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      42. Lighting the Way: NIOSH Cap Lamp
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      43. Making the Link Between Public Health & Aging
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      44. MedlinePlus Connect
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      45. Million Hearts Initiative
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITE
      46. Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools
      47. Modernizing the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      48. MONAHRQ – My Own Network, powered by AHRQ
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      49. Moving Drug Addiction Science into the Mainstream
      50. Moving Towards Energy Efficient NIH Laboratories
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      51. NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      52. NIH RePORT: Public Access to Research
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      53. Online Food Handler Training Project
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      54. openFDA
        1. Presidential Innovation Fellow: Sean Herron
        2. More information on openFDA
      55. Stopping a Fungal Meningitis Outbreak
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      56. Piloting Green Laboratories
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      57. Superbug Code Breakers
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      58. Portal System: Linking Healthcare Clinics
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      59. Supporting Tribal Grantees: ACF Makes it Simple
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      60. Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      61. The 100k Genome Project
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      62. Publication Planning & Clearance Process Improvement Project
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      63. The Body Weight Simulator
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      64. The CDC Health Game Jam 2013
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      65. Ready, Cert, Go!
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      66. The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      67. Project Boundary
        1. BACKGROUND
        2. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
          1. HOW DOES THE SYSTEM WORK?
          2. THE BEACONS AS A ONE-WAY TRANSMITTER
          3. THE PHONE AS A RECEIVER
        3. POTENTIAL DEMOS
      68. Project Sandbox
        1. AN OVERVIEW
        2. OUR FIRST FOCUS AREA: HOME-BASED PRIMARY CARE OF THE FRAIL ELDERLY.
          1. THE PROBLEM AND UNDERSERVED NEED
          2. BARRIERS TO PRIMARY CARE
          3. THE HOUSE CALL MODEL – A POTENTIAL SOLUTION & KEY OUTCOMES
        3. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
      69. The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge
      70. Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR)
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      71. The National Database for Autism Research
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      72. Revolutionizing Procurement Through the Web
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      73. The National Health Service Corps Job Center
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      74. The NIH 3D Print Exchange
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      75. The NLM Pillbox: More Efficient Data Cleanup and Outputs
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      76. The Weight of the Nation Campaign
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
    4. Our Pathways
      1. HHS Innovates
      2. HHS Entrepreneurs
      3. HHS Innovator-In-Residence
      4. HHS Ignite
      5. HHS Ventures​
      6. HHS Competes​
      7. IDEA Lab Sponsored Projects
      8. HHS Connects
      9. HHS Health Data Initiative
    5. The Blog
      1. WHY THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD HIRE MORE PRODUCT PEOPLE
      2. APPLY NOW! HHS ENTREPRENEURS IS BACK AND LOOKING FOR TALENT!
      3. INNOVATING TO TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE
      4. CALLING ALL CODERS! CODE-A-PALOOZA SUBMISSIONS NOW OPEN
      5. PERSONALLY-GENERATED HEALTH DATA – THE NEXT FRONTIER
      6. HHS IDEA LAB @ SXSW
      7. HHS IGNITE: NOW ACCEPTING YOUR FUNDING PROPOSALS!
      8. COME JOIN THE HHS IDEA LAB TEAM! APPLY TO BE THE NEXT HEALTH DATA INNOVATOR
      9. HHS IGNITE INNOVATION DAY: JOIN US THIS FRIDAY!
      10. DATA FUELING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH CARE TRANSFORMATION
      11. PRA: THE GOVERNMENT’S MILLION DOLLAR SURVEY?
      12. PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH
      13. DATA.CDC.GOV: ENERGIZING DATA TO BETTER TELL THE STORY
      14. NOW SOLICITING FEEDBACK ON THE STRATEGIC VISION FOR INNOVATION AT THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
      15. HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE SELECTED TEAMS & THE BANK OF IDEAS
      16. NOW OPEN! APPLY TO WORK ON HIGH IMPACT PROJECTS IN 2ND ANNUAL TALENT SEARCH FOR THE HHSENTREPRENEURS PROGRAM
      17. HEALTH DATAPALOOZA IV TOPS OFF A HUGE YEAR IN HEALTH DATA LIBERATION & INNOVATION
      18. MR. POTATOHEAD MEETS THE SECRETARY!!!
      19. HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE WHAT’S AND WHY’S OF YOUR PROPOSAL
      20. HHSIGNITES (BETA): AN INNOVATION SEED-FUNDING OPPORTUNITY
      21. INNOVATION AND EXPERIMENTATION GOING VIRAL AT HHS
      22. HHSINNOVATES PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD, VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE
      23. COMMUNITY RESILIENCY
      24. INNOVATION: LIVING SOCIAL PROCESS
      25. THE LEAN VIRUS HAS HIT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT…. KAIZEN!
      26. INNOVATION 101
      27. YOU DON’T TRACK WHAT?
      28. MAP IT LIKE IT’S HOT!!
      29. WELCOME TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT!
      30. WHAT A PICTURE IS WORTH
      31. JUMPING IN FEET LAST
      32. ROUND FIVE OF HHSINNOVATES CONCLUDES & LESSONS LEARNED
      33. INNOVATION FELLOWS TECHNICAL ADVISORS: IMPORTANT COMPONENTS TO THE HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM
      34. FIRST-TIME PUBLIC VOTING FOR TOP HEALTH INNOVATIONS AT HHS, VOTE NOW!
      35. NEW DIGITAL GOVERNMENT STRATEGY MAKES INFORMATION MORE USEFUL AND DYNAMIC
      36. NEW INNOVATION OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCED! – HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM
      37. ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS ROCK 3RD ANNUAL HEALTH DATAPALOOZA
      38. THE GROWING ROLE FOR MOBILE PHONES IN PUBLIC HEALTH
      39. HEALTH TECHTALK
      40. WE’RE LAUNCHING HHS’ NEW OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN, VERSION 2.0
      41. PROTECTING PRIVACY AND BUILDING TRUST AS MOBILE AND ONLINE HEALTH EVOLVE
      42. TWO NEW WAYS FOR YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT
      43. OBAMA ADMINISTRATION AND TEXT4BABY JOIN FORCES TO CONNECT PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN TO HEALTH COVERAGE AND INFORMATION
      44. MHEALTH INNOVATION AND DEVELOPERS CHALLENGES
      45. CELEBRATING INNOVATIVE HEALTH PROMOTION APPS – WINNERS OF THE SG CHALLENGE
      46. HELP US DEVELOP OUR NEW OPEN GOV PLAN
      47. MHEALTH RESEARCH & EVALUATION: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
      48. U.S. SURGEON GENERAL’S HEALTHY APP CHALLENGE
      49. COMPLEXITIES AND CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPING MHEALTH PROGRAMS
      50. CELEBRATING INNOVATION! APPS CHALLENGE WINNERS AT THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE
      51. ANNOUNCING THE LEADING HEALTH INDICATORS APPS CHALLENGE
      52. THREE APPROACHES TO MHEALTH
      53. PROMOTING A “THINK DIFFERENTLY” ATTITUDE AT HHS
      54. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CELEBRATES THE UNITED STATES’ ENTRY INTO THE OPEN GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP
      55. ADVANCING TEXT MESSAGING FOR HEALTH
      56. NEW YORK INCREASES ACCESS TO HEALTH DATA
      57. THE POWER OF MANY: CROWDSOURCING OUR WAY TO SOLUTIONS
      58. JUNE 2011 OPEN GOVERNMENT PROGRESS REPORT RELEASE
      59. CALLING ALL HEALTH INNOVATORS: HEALTH DATA PALOOZA LIVE JUNE 9TH
      60. GREATLY IMPROVED PUBLIC REPORTING OF HHS GRANTS DATA
      61. ADDING VALUE AT HHS THROUGH INNOVATION
      62. HELP SHAPE THE NEW FEDERAL HEALTH IT STRATEGIC PLAN
      63. CELEBRATING SUNSHINE WEEK AT HHS
      64. WELCOME TO HEALTHDATA.GOV!
      65. ADVANCING A CULTURE OF INNOVATION AT HHS
      66. THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE’S NEW API PORTAL
      67. HHSINNOVATES AWARDS PROGRAM
      68. STRATEGIC PLAN
      69. NOW PLAYING: NEW DEVELOPER CHALLENGES USING HEALTH DATA!
      70. HHS'S OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN: VERSION 1.1
      71. SECRETARY’S INNOVATION AWARDS PROGRAM – HHSINNOVATES!
      72. HHS AND INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE PROMOTE COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA INITIATIVE
      73. COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA FORUM: HARNESSING THE POWER OF INFORMATION TO IMPROVE HEALTH
      74. DESIGN FOR AMERICA – VISUALIZING HEALTH DATA TO INSPIRE COMMUNITY ACTION
      75. SECRETARY KATHLEEN SEBELIUS’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY
      76. HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN
      77. FOLKS HAVE POSTED TERRIFIC OPEN GOVERNMENT THOUGHTS
      78. OPEN GOVERNMENT IS POWERED BY YOU
      79. GETTING STARTED
  18. NEXT​

  1. Story
  2. HHS Welcomes a New Surge of Talent to Solve Some of the Biggest Challenges in Health Care and Government
    1. Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information
    2. Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why
    3. Modernizing CDC Mortality Data & Analytic Tools
    4. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases
    5. About the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program
  3. Tune into the HHS IDEA Lab's Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Day November 13, 2014
  4. Tell us what you think: How can we use technology to reach the under-served?
  5. Story
  6. Media Advisory
  7. What is the HHS IDEA Lab?
  8. The HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank & Demo Day
    1. The Panelists (Our ‘Sharks’)
    2. Presentations
      1. Improving Access to Health Care Using a Fast Track System
      2. Revisiting an Annual Report to Congress
      3. Student Loan Data Sharing with the Department of Education
      4. Upgrading the Genetic Variable Search
      5. Enhancing CMS Outreach with Coordination Solutions
      6. Resourcing Community Ideas Regionally
      7. The CDC Open Idea Lab
      8. GINAS: Advancing FDA's Ingredient Information System
      9. Automatic X-Ray Screening for Rural Areas
      10. Fostering Scientific Insight through Data Federation
      11. Increasing NIH Clinical Center Research Interns and Internships
    3. In the afternoon, it'll be more casual.
  9. HHS Ignite Application
    1. Eligibility
    2. We Begin Accepting Proposals Again in October, 2014
    3. Interested in Applying?
    4. The Scoring Criteria and Selection Process
  10. Story
    1. Data Dictionary
    2. People
    3. Projects
    4. Blogs
    5. Linked Data Publication in a Data Browser
  11. Slides
    1. Slide 1 HHS IDEA LAB
    2. Slide 2 Data Science for the HHS IDEA LAB Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 3 Spreadsheet Knowledge Base 1
    4. Slide 4 Spreadsheet Knowledge Base 2
    5. Slide 5 Spreadsheet People
    6. Slide 6 Spreadsheet Projects
    7. Slide 7 Spreadsheet Blogs
    8. Slide 8 Spotfire Cover Page
    9. Slide 9 Spotfire Data Ecosystem
    10. Slide 10 Health, United States, 2013 (in process)
  12. Spotfire Dashboard
  13. Research Notes
  14. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases Fellowship
  15. HDC Webinar: The HHS HDI Strategy & Execution Plan
  16. The New HHS Health Data Strategy and Execution Plan
    1. HDI Strategic Goals
  17. HHS IDEA LAB
    1. About the Lab
    2. The People
      1. HHS IDEA Lab Staff
        1. Lucky,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        2. Cassandra Duarte,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        3. Julie Herron, HHS IDEA Lab
        4. Sandeep Patel,​ HHS IDEA Lab
        5. Will Yang, HHS IDEA Lab
        6. Damon Davis, HHS IDEA Lab
        7. Elizabeth Kittrie, HHS IDEA Lab
        8. Bryan Sivak, HHS IDEA Lab
        9. Read Holman, HHS IDEA Lab
        10. Steven Randazzo, HHS IDEA Lab
        11. Greg Downing, HHS IDEA Lab
      2. People: HHS Entrepreneurs
        1. Chris Lunt, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        2. Frank Sanborn, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
        3. Kevin Larsen, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT
        4. Amy Sherwood, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        5. Mindy Hangsleben, ONC for Health IT
        6. Zachery Jiwa, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
        7. David Cartier, Health Resources and Services Administration
      3. People: HHS Innovates
        1. Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living
        2. Claro Yu, National Institutes of Health
        3. Debra J. Grabowski, Indian Health Service
        4. Eric S. Weiss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        5. Gwen Shinko, National Institutes of Health
        6. Ivor D’Souza, National Institutes of Health
        7. James Onken, National Institutes of Health
        8. Joyce E. B. Backus, National Institutes of Health
        9. Juliette S. Kendrick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        10. Kathy Slawson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        11. Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service
        12. Lynn Sokler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        13. Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health
        14. Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration
        15. Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health
        16. Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration
        17. Richard Schieber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        18. Stacey Mattison, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        19. Manuel B. Datiles III, National Institutes of Health
      4. People: HHS Innovator-in-Residence
        1. Nag Murty, West Health / IDEA Lab
        2. Pierce Graham-Jones, ​HHS IDEA Lab
      5. People: Presidential Innovation Fellows
        1. Adam Dole, ONC for Health IT
        2. Nayan Jain, ONC for Health IT
        3. Sean Herron, Food and Drug Administration
      6. People: Sammies
        1. Julie Segre, National Institutes of Health
        2. Nora D. Volkow, National Institutes of Health
        3. Tara Palmore, National Institutes of Health
        4. Hamid Jafari, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
        5. Michael Gottesman, National Institutes of Health
        6. J. Todd Weber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    3. The Projects
      1. Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      2. Anti-Cancer Research
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      3. Application of Design Thinking to Grants
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      4. Automate Blue Button Initiative
      5. Blue Button Project
        1. Presidential Innovation Fellows
        2. More information on the Blue Button Initiative
      6. Bridging the CHASM of Health Disparities
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      7. Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      8. Building Health Resilience Technology to Withstand Natural Disasters
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
      9. CDCOLOGY: A Microtasking Project
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. TEAM MEMBERS
        4. Additional Information
      10. Cloud-Based GIS Maps Displaying Aggregate Data on Medical Malpractice
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      11. CMS Coordinated Press Response Strategy
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. TEAM MEMBERS
        4. Additional Information
      12. Connecting Kids with Dental Care
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      13. Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      14. Creating De-Identified Claims Data
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION: 
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS 
      15. Creating a Polio-Free World
      16. Data-Driven Website Optimization Using Multivariate Testing
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      17. Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      18. Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why?
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
      19. Developing a Data-Driven ACF Workforce
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      20. Education Through Wireless SMS
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      21. Electronic Health Records in Action
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      22. Electronic Patient Tracking in Disasters
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
      23. Electronic Tracking & Transport of the Nation’s Organ Transplant System
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      24. Fast-Screening CE-MS Method for Bacteria Through Protein Pattern Recognition
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. IMAGES
      25. FDA-iRISK: A Fast Tool for Food Safety
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. RELATED FACT SHEETS
      26. FDA-TRACK Gallery Submissions
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS  
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      27. FDA’s Anti-Counterfeit Device
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED ARTICLES
        4. RELATED PICTURES
      28. Forming Partnerships to Develop Lifesaving Technologies
      29. From Outer Space to the Eye Clinic
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED PUBLICATION
      30. Getting more out of Video: NLM Video Search
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      31. Health Data Consortium Affiliates Network
      32. Health Information Exchange Accelerators
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      33. Healthcare Practitioner Credentialing Portal
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. APPLY NOW
        4. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS 
      34. IHS Workforce Development: Going Lean to Understand Needs
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      35. Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information
      36. Improving Health & Stability in Food Choices
      37. Increasing Efficiency in Rule Making with Natural Language Processing
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Product Summary
        3. Team Members
      38. Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases
        1. ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION
        2. HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?
        3. INTERNAL ENTREPRENRURS
      39. Integrating Health Insurance Marketplace Data to Visualize Efforts and Impact
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      40. Joining Forces to Fight Childhood Obesity
        1. TEAM MEMERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      41. Leveraging the Public to Catch Fugitives
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITES
      42. Lighting the Way: NIOSH Cap Lamp
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      43. Making the Link Between Public Health & Aging
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      44. MedlinePlus Connect
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      45. Million Hearts Initiative
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. RELATED WEBSITE
      46. Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools
      47. Modernizing the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      48. MONAHRQ – My Own Network, powered by AHRQ
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      49. Moving Drug Addiction Science into the Mainstream
      50. Moving Towards Energy Efficient NIH Laboratories
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      51. NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      52. NIH RePORT: Public Access to Research
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      53. Online Food Handler Training Project
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      54. openFDA
        1. Presidential Innovation Fellow: Sean Herron
        2. More information on openFDA
      55. Stopping a Fungal Meningitis Outbreak
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      56. Piloting Green Laboratories
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      57. Superbug Code Breakers
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      58. Portal System: Linking Healthcare Clinics
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      59. Supporting Tribal Grantees: ACF Makes it Simple
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      60. Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS 
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
      61. The 100k Genome Project
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      62. Publication Planning & Clearance Process Improvement Project
        1. INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS
        2. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR
        3. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      63. The Body Weight Simulator
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
      64. The CDC Health Game Jam 2013
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      65. Ready, Cert, Go!
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      66. The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      67. Project Boundary
        1. BACKGROUND
        2. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
          1. HOW DOES THE SYSTEM WORK?
          2. THE BEACONS AS A ONE-WAY TRANSMITTER
          3. THE PHONE AS A RECEIVER
        3. POTENTIAL DEMOS
      68. Project Sandbox
        1. AN OVERVIEW
        2. OUR FIRST FOCUS AREA: HOME-BASED PRIMARY CARE OF THE FRAIL ELDERLY.
          1. THE PROBLEM AND UNDERSERVED NEED
          2. BARRIERS TO PRIMARY CARE
          3. THE HOUSE CALL MODEL – A POTENTIAL SOLUTION & KEY OUTCOMES
        3. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
      69. The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge
      70. Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR)
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      71. The National Database for Autism Research
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      72. Revolutionizing Procurement Through the Web
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
      73. The National Health Service Corps Job Center
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITE
      74. The NIH 3D Print Exchange
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
      75. The NLM Pillbox: More Efficient Data Cleanup and Outputs
        1. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
        2. Project Summary
        3. Team Members
        4. Additional Information
      76. The Weight of the Nation Campaign
        1. TEAM MEMBERS
        2. READ RELATED BLOG POSTS
        3. RELATED WEBSITES
        4. WATCH RELATED VIDEO
    4. Our Pathways
      1. HHS Innovates
      2. HHS Entrepreneurs
      3. HHS Innovator-In-Residence
      4. HHS Ignite
      5. HHS Ventures​
      6. HHS Competes​
      7. IDEA Lab Sponsored Projects
      8. HHS Connects
      9. HHS Health Data Initiative
    5. The Blog
      1. WHY THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD HIRE MORE PRODUCT PEOPLE
      2. APPLY NOW! HHS ENTREPRENEURS IS BACK AND LOOKING FOR TALENT!
      3. INNOVATING TO TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE
      4. CALLING ALL CODERS! CODE-A-PALOOZA SUBMISSIONS NOW OPEN
      5. PERSONALLY-GENERATED HEALTH DATA – THE NEXT FRONTIER
      6. HHS IDEA LAB @ SXSW
      7. HHS IGNITE: NOW ACCEPTING YOUR FUNDING PROPOSALS!
      8. COME JOIN THE HHS IDEA LAB TEAM! APPLY TO BE THE NEXT HEALTH DATA INNOVATOR
      9. HHS IGNITE INNOVATION DAY: JOIN US THIS FRIDAY!
      10. DATA FUELING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH CARE TRANSFORMATION
      11. PRA: THE GOVERNMENT’S MILLION DOLLAR SURVEY?
      12. PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH
      13. DATA.CDC.GOV: ENERGIZING DATA TO BETTER TELL THE STORY
      14. NOW SOLICITING FEEDBACK ON THE STRATEGIC VISION FOR INNOVATION AT THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
      15. HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE SELECTED TEAMS & THE BANK OF IDEAS
      16. NOW OPEN! APPLY TO WORK ON HIGH IMPACT PROJECTS IN 2ND ANNUAL TALENT SEARCH FOR THE HHSENTREPRENEURS PROGRAM
      17. HEALTH DATAPALOOZA IV TOPS OFF A HUGE YEAR IN HEALTH DATA LIBERATION & INNOVATION
      18. MR. POTATOHEAD MEETS THE SECRETARY!!!
      19. HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE WHAT’S AND WHY’S OF YOUR PROPOSAL
      20. HHSIGNITES (BETA): AN INNOVATION SEED-FUNDING OPPORTUNITY
      21. INNOVATION AND EXPERIMENTATION GOING VIRAL AT HHS
      22. HHSINNOVATES PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD, VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE
      23. COMMUNITY RESILIENCY
      24. INNOVATION: LIVING SOCIAL PROCESS
      25. THE LEAN VIRUS HAS HIT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT…. KAIZEN!
      26. INNOVATION 101
      27. YOU DON’T TRACK WHAT?
      28. MAP IT LIKE IT’S HOT!!
      29. WELCOME TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT!
      30. WHAT A PICTURE IS WORTH
      31. JUMPING IN FEET LAST
      32. ROUND FIVE OF HHSINNOVATES CONCLUDES & LESSONS LEARNED
      33. INNOVATION FELLOWS TECHNICAL ADVISORS: IMPORTANT COMPONENTS TO THE HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM
      34. FIRST-TIME PUBLIC VOTING FOR TOP HEALTH INNOVATIONS AT HHS, VOTE NOW!
      35. NEW DIGITAL GOVERNMENT STRATEGY MAKES INFORMATION MORE USEFUL AND DYNAMIC
      36. NEW INNOVATION OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCED! – HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM
      37. ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS ROCK 3RD ANNUAL HEALTH DATAPALOOZA
      38. THE GROWING ROLE FOR MOBILE PHONES IN PUBLIC HEALTH
      39. HEALTH TECHTALK
      40. WE’RE LAUNCHING HHS’ NEW OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN, VERSION 2.0
      41. PROTECTING PRIVACY AND BUILDING TRUST AS MOBILE AND ONLINE HEALTH EVOLVE
      42. TWO NEW WAYS FOR YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT
      43. OBAMA ADMINISTRATION AND TEXT4BABY JOIN FORCES TO CONNECT PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN TO HEALTH COVERAGE AND INFORMATION
      44. MHEALTH INNOVATION AND DEVELOPERS CHALLENGES
      45. CELEBRATING INNOVATIVE HEALTH PROMOTION APPS – WINNERS OF THE SG CHALLENGE
      46. HELP US DEVELOP OUR NEW OPEN GOV PLAN
      47. MHEALTH RESEARCH & EVALUATION: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
      48. U.S. SURGEON GENERAL’S HEALTHY APP CHALLENGE
      49. COMPLEXITIES AND CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPING MHEALTH PROGRAMS
      50. CELEBRATING INNOVATION! APPS CHALLENGE WINNERS AT THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE
      51. ANNOUNCING THE LEADING HEALTH INDICATORS APPS CHALLENGE
      52. THREE APPROACHES TO MHEALTH
      53. PROMOTING A “THINK DIFFERENTLY” ATTITUDE AT HHS
      54. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CELEBRATES THE UNITED STATES’ ENTRY INTO THE OPEN GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP
      55. ADVANCING TEXT MESSAGING FOR HEALTH
      56. NEW YORK INCREASES ACCESS TO HEALTH DATA
      57. THE POWER OF MANY: CROWDSOURCING OUR WAY TO SOLUTIONS
      58. JUNE 2011 OPEN GOVERNMENT PROGRESS REPORT RELEASE
      59. CALLING ALL HEALTH INNOVATORS: HEALTH DATA PALOOZA LIVE JUNE 9TH
      60. GREATLY IMPROVED PUBLIC REPORTING OF HHS GRANTS DATA
      61. ADDING VALUE AT HHS THROUGH INNOVATION
      62. HELP SHAPE THE NEW FEDERAL HEALTH IT STRATEGIC PLAN
      63. CELEBRATING SUNSHINE WEEK AT HHS
      64. WELCOME TO HEALTHDATA.GOV!
      65. ADVANCING A CULTURE OF INNOVATION AT HHS
      66. THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE’S NEW API PORTAL
      67. HHSINNOVATES AWARDS PROGRAM
      68. STRATEGIC PLAN
      69. NOW PLAYING: NEW DEVELOPER CHALLENGES USING HEALTH DATA!
      70. HHS'S OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN: VERSION 1.1
      71. SECRETARY’S INNOVATION AWARDS PROGRAM – HHSINNOVATES!
      72. HHS AND INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE PROMOTE COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA INITIATIVE
      73. COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA FORUM: HARNESSING THE POWER OF INFORMATION TO IMPROVE HEALTH
      74. DESIGN FOR AMERICA – VISUALIZING HEALTH DATA TO INSPIRE COMMUNITY ACTION
      75. SECRETARY KATHLEEN SEBELIUS’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY
      76. HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN
      77. FOLKS HAVE POSTED TERRIFIC OPEN GOVERNMENT THOUGHTS
      78. OPEN GOVERNMENT IS POWERED BY YOU
      79. GETTING STARTED
  18. NEXT​

Story

Data Science, Data Infrastructure, & Data Publications for the HHS IDEA Lab

In preparation for our December 1st Meetup, I participated in the Tune into the HHS IDEA Lab's Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Day November 13, 2014 and analyzed the four new projects in the HHS Welcomes a New Surge of Talent to Solve Some of the Biggest Challenges in Health Care and Government announcement.

The Webinar featured:

  • Bill Corr, Deputy Secretary - he welcomed, apologized for the HHS Secretary not be present, and left
  • Bryan Sivak, Chief Technology Officer - he welcome and moderated
  • Megan Smith, U.S. Chief Technology Officer (invited-attended) - she welcomed, made some remarks, and left

There were six HHS Entrepreneurs Cohort 2 Presentations, some with slides and others without slides. None of them were really what I call a data science approach to data infrastructure and data publications.

The four new project teams – consisting of HHS employees and an Entrepreneur-in-Residence will work for a 12 month period to solve an identified problem, employ the use of startup methodologies, like agile development, lean startup, and design thinking, and contribute to the HHS IDEA Lab’s goal of change the culture of the Department.

The four new projects with my comments below are:

  • Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information: Redesign the CMS Blue Button to enable it as a Data-as-a-Service platform to empower patients and enable the use of the data with third party applications
  • Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why: The Administration for Community Living (ACL) wants to explore how the aging and disability communities are using technology and new media to learn about and manage services.
    • Again applications should by data services, Section 508 compliant, and author once-serve many.
  • Modernizing CDC Mortality Data & Analytic Tools: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is undertaking a project to create the next generation Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS) to obtain more timely mortality data and provide tools for meaningful analysis of these data.
    • I met with Brian Lee and he encouraged me to apply for this because they wanted a data scientists that could do dashboards which I did for them with their Health United States 2013.
  • Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases:As the largest funder of biomedical research in the world, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) directly and indirectly generates massive amounts of scientific data through research, grants, and contracts. The HHS Office of the Chief Information Officer and the HHS IDEA Lab want to build an innovative strategy to design, develop and link public-facing research database applications for the HHS.
    • I met with Bryan Sivak and Damon Davis and they encouraged me to apply for this, which I did using thie data science work in this wiki page.

MOTE TO FOLLOW FROM MEETUP

HHS Welcomes a New Surge of Talent to Solve Some of the Biggest Challenges in Health Care and Government

Source: http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/2014/11/1...nd-government/

November 13, 2014

Today, Bryan Sivak, U.S. Department and Health and Human Services Chief Technology Officer, announced the newest cohort of HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence. Part of the Secretary’s Initiatives to better serve the American people, the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence program matches HHS employees with external expertise to work on a high risk high reward projects over a 13-month period.

Selected from amongst the most talented pool of applicants yet, the Entrepreneurs-in-Residence have a diverse experience from co-founding companies – like Mark Scrimshire, who co-founded HealthCa.mp, a consumer-focused health care company, or Danny Boice, who co-founded Speek, a company that is simplifying conference calling and screen sharing – to data science, like Paula Braun, who led a team of data scientists and software engineers to provide analytics and advanced statistical programming for a federal financial regulator agency – to big data and IT development, like David Portnoy who has spent nearly 20 years building innovative big data applications for enterprise clients.

Today’s announcement culminates a nearly nine month process in the development of the 3rdCohort of HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence. In February, the HHS IDEA Lab recruited project ideas from HHS Employees and announced the selected projects in May. Projects were selected based on their potential impact and use of innovative solutions to overcome barriers to progress. From there, we called on the entrepreneurs of America to serve their country and work in government to take on problems like the modernization of data bases, to analyzing the use of social media with the aging and disability population.

Together, each project team – consisting of HHS employees and an Entrepreneur-in-Residence will work for a 12 month period to solve an identified problem, employ the use of startup methodologies, like agile development, lean startup, and design thinking, and contribute to the HHS IDEA Lab’s goal of change the culture of the Department.

Full project descriptions and bios can be found below.


Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information

Project Description: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) want to redesign the CMS Blue Button to enable it as a Data-as-a-Service platform to empower patients and enable the use of the data with third party applications. Read more >>

HHS Lead: Niall Brennan

Entrepreneur-in-Residence: Mark Scrimshire

About Mark: Mark is a lifelong IT ninja and data guru who has led teams in high technology industries from healthcare to telecommunications and software. Prior to joining CMS, Mark co-founded Medyear where, as CTO, he played a lead role in developing the first Consumer-Mediated Exchange built on BlueButton Plus, Direct and Big Data technologies. Previously, Mark led the cloud-platform initiative for 3M Health Information Systems, implementing a cloud-based big data platform to support ICD-10 Computer-Assisted Coding. Before that he served as Internet Channel Strategist for CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield. While at CareFirst, Mark established the HealthCa.mp Foundation, an organization that runs international “un-conferences” to promote both consumer engagement in health care systems design and the adoption of modern web technologies to solve our health care challenges.

Mark’s LinkedIn


Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why

Project Description: The Administration for Community Living (ACL) wants to explore how the aging and disability communities are using technology and new media to learn about and manage services. Read more >>

HHS Leads: Jason Bennett, Scott Cory

Entrepreneur-in-Residence: Danny Boice

About Danny: Danny Boice, a through and through entrepreneur and Lean Startup disciple, co-founded Speek in 2012 and ran product, tech and marketing for the funded startup.  Speek is a venture funded startup which allows millions of users to do conference calls without annoying phone numbers and PINs.  Danny attended Harvard undergrad, is a Forbes columnist, Adjunct Professor at Georgetown, a Tech Titan by Washingtonian Magazine, and has been published in numerous major publications.

Danny previously served as an Executive for The College Board. Danny’s responsibilities included launching new products and driving technology innovation in the arena’s of web, mobile, social and other cutting edge digital domains across all of these programs and constituents.

Prior to working at The College Board, Danny served as the Chief Technology Officer for CommuniClique where he led the development of their cloud-based product while establishing and growing their Open API / Developer Community. He also served as Vice President at Pantheon leading several high visibility web and mobile product development projects for Fortune 500 clients. Boice joined Pantheon in 2006 when they acquired Jaxara – a company he founded in 2002.

Danny’s LinkedIn


Modernizing CDC Mortality Data & Analytic Tools

Project Description: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is undertaking a project to create the next generation Electronic Death Registration System (EDRS) to obtain more timely mortality data and provide tools for meaningful analysis of these data. Read more >>

HHS Lead: Brian A. Lee

Entrepreneur-in-Residence: Paula Braun

About Paula: Paula, a Data Scientist with Elder Research, Inc, where she lead a team of Data Scientists and Software Engineers to help federal regulators identify risks in financial markets using data mining and advanced analytics. Paula began her career as a Presidential Management Fellow with the CDC and went on to work as an analyst at the Government Accountability Office. With a strong commitment to public service and a desire to broaden her experience, Paula deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan to audit wartime spending with the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction and the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. After two years of living and working in active war zones, Paula returned to graduate school to study data science and predictive analytics. Paula also has taught for Emory University’s Executive Masters of Public Health program.

Paula’s LinkedIn


Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases

Project Description: As the largest funder of biomedical research in the world, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) directly and indirectly generates massive amounts of scientific data through research, grants, and contracts. The HHS Office of the Chief Information Officer and the HHS IDEA Lab want to build an innovative strategy to design, develop and link public-facing research database applications for the HHS. Read more >>

HHS Leads: Damon Davis and Keith Tucker

Entrepreneur-in-Residence: David Portnoy

About David: A seasoned big data entrepreneur and startup shepherd, David has been developing applications for enterprise clients and helping startups get their data driven technology products to market. Most recently, David built a first of its kind transaction based marketplace for medical services for Symbiosis Health, a Blueprint Health backed startup.  Prior to Symbiosis, he created a technical product roadmap for the nation’s largest claims data repository for BlueCross, designed automation of healthcare economics reporting for WellPoint, and applied agile methods to build big data systems for enterprises like IBM, Sears and Office Depot.  David started his career at AT&T, where he implemented large scale enterprise systems and data warehouses for some of the world’s largest call centers.  He continues to mentor health technology startups in Chicago, as well as companies accepted to the HealthBox accelerator.  David has degrees in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering and an MBA from Washington University in St. Louis.

David’s LinkedIn


About the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program

Now in its third cohort, the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence program has been a vehicle for solving problems ranging from the modernization of the organ transplant system, to the improvement of government processes, to increasing the usability of government databases.  To date, the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence program has recruited 20 entrepreneurs from the private sector into government to work with HHS employees on a total of 13 projects. For more information about HHS Entrepreneurs, please contact Julie Schneider (Julie.schneider@hhs.gov).

Tune into the HHS IDEA Lab's Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Day November 13, 2014

Source: http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/2014/11/0...vember-132014/

Join the HHS IDEA Lab and HHS leadership on November 13, 2014 from 10:30 AM – 12:15 PM ET for the HHS IDEA Lab Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Day featuring six entrepreneur-in-residence teams that have been working for 13 months to solve some of the biggest challenges in government and health care.

We invite you to tune in to hear from Cohort 2 participants of the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program who will present their accomplishments, lessons learned and next steps on six high-risk high reward projects.  Projects cover a number of topics ranging from geographic information systems (GIS) mapping, to health information exchanges to streamline transitions of care for patients, to an improved publication planning and clearance process focused on measuring the impact of HHS communications materials. 

HHS has strong assets and leadership to create and develop new products but in some instances, lacks the expertise to get us there. The HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence program aims to bring external ideas and talent in areas including open innovation, agile development, and lean methodologies to rapidly create, develop, engage and accelerate innovation and problem solving.  The HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program helps HHS employees recruit the expertise they are looking for and bring them into federal government.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about the HHS Entrepreneurs-in-Residence Program and how HHS employees are identifying critical problems and finding innovative solutions. The full agenda is below.

November 13, 2014 | Register for the Webinar Now!

Full agenda below. 

Welcome and Introduction
 
10:30 a.m. ET                
Bill Corr, Deputy Secretary

Bryan Sivak, Chief Technology Officer

Megan Smith, U.S. Chief Technology Officer (invited)
 
HHS Entrepreneurs Cohort 2 Presentations
           
10:45 a.m. 
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services: Modernizing the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System
 
11:00 a.m. 
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs: Publication Planning and Clearance Process Improvement
 
11:15 a.m. 
Health Resources and Services Administration: Cloud-Based GIS Maps Displaying Aggregate Medical Malpractice Data
 
11:30 a.m. 
Administration for Children and Families: Building a Design-Minded and More Collaborative Office of Family Assistance
 
11:45 a.m. 
Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology: Health Information Exchange Accelerators
 
12:00 p.m.  
HHS Immediate Office of the Secretary: Innovator-In-Residence Projects in Partnership with WestHealth

Tell us what you think: How can we use technology to reach the under-served?

October 22, 2014 Email

 

 

 

 

Tell us what you think: What can we do to help use the power of information and communication technologies to reach every population that HHS serves?


The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the U.S. government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves.  Our work reaches Americans in nearly all areas of health and wellness, in rural and urban areas, and across all stages of life. In all these arenas, technology and data has helped drive innovation and improvements in services. Still, there are some underserved communities;  including low income or working poor families, geographically isolated areas, some communities of color and other vulnerable groups; which are not benefiting from the full impact of the massive wave of technological innovation that is foundational to health and social services improvement. 

Some have questioned whether the brainpower of technology entrepreneurs is being directly focused or fully utilized to combat some of our nation’s biggest challenges.  We have so many apps and gadgets to make our lives more efficient and convenient, yet products and solutions designed with and for vulnerable populations are in short supply, suggesting the existence of an innovation gap.

The explosion in health technology has brought us everything from iPads in the emergency room to advanced artificial limbs; and importantly a new industry in mobile health tech.  With all this innovation, it is worth asking ourselves:  What can we do to help use the power of information and communication technologies to reach every population that HHS serves?

At the HHS IDEA Lab, we have been scanning the environment to learn more about this problem.  First we asked - Do vulnerable populations, minority communities, and those with lower socioeconomic status have access to health information technology, mobile phones and the internet?

The answer to this question is a resounding YES.  Even though there is still a digital divide in the US, it is shrinking. 

According the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project [1], 84% of adults with income below $30,000 had cell phones, and 47% owned smartphones.  Mobile and smart phone ownership is higher among Latino adults, 92% and 61% versus 90% and 53% for white populations, respectively.  Older Americans reported that 59% of them go online, and surprisingly 61% of those 80 years of age or older own cell phones. 

In the September, 2014 issue of Telemedicine and eHealth [2], researchers published the results from a multisite survey with homeless veterans.  Their results indicated that 89% of subjects had a mobile phone, and 76% used the Internet; nearly all reported that they wanted to use the technology to help manage their health care. 

Finally, we know that the HHS supported Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) have higher rates of electronic health record adoption than office-based physicians and other large practices.  A Commonwealth Fund study from May 2014 found that fully 93% of nationally surveyed FQHCs have an electronic health record system in place. [3]

Unfortunately, this growing trend of mobile and other technology adoption by the populations served by HHS is not being matched by innovative ideas and solutions designed to meet their specific needs.  For example, a quick search of “eviction” in  a well-known app store found over a dozen products for landlords and property owners to help them manage their tenants; and only a few with guidance for people looking to find resources or information about how to avoid eviction. 

There are some ground-breaking examples of technology solutions that bridge the innovation gap.  HealthShack is a web-based, electronic personal record that allows youth to upload everything from health records to school transcripts in a secure environment.  It was designed in 2009 in California, for and with vulnerable teenagers and youth.  HealthShack is unique in that it is youth-controlled and targeted towards homeless, foster care and other marginalized youth.  It was highlighted at this year’s Consumer Health IT Summit, organized by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT at HHS (ONC) [4]. HealthShack is an example of a technology solution that is bridging the innovation gap, but we have found that non-profit and community organizations are often too overwhelmed to find time or resources to develop responses for their increasingly tech savvy clients.

Our initial scan revealed some additional contributors to the problem:

  • “There are no financial incentives for developers to focus efforts on the targeted populations”
  • “There is low IT literacy within non-profits”
  • “People would have no money to purchase the innovations if they did exist”
  • “Time is too scarce for low income families to learn new technology”
  • “Rural areas have too little broadband access”
  • “Privacy & security concerns prevent people from being willing to share personal information”
  • “The language & accessibility challenges are too difficult to overcome”
  • “Donor and foundations have little or no interest”
  • “Developers have little information about these "markets" (they don't know what they want/need)”

HHS IDEA LAB is looking for your thoughts, ideas and input on this issue. 

Do you think the assumptions and barriers listed above are true, or is something else at work? 

What do you think is the cause behind this innovation gap; and how can HHS spur more solutions? 

Or, if you prefer, you can send your input and ideas to allyn.moushey2@hhs.gov or tweet to us at @HHSIDEALab.


[1] http://www.pewinternet.org/

[2] Telemed J E Health. 2014 Sep;20(9):801-9. doi: 10.1089/tmj.2013.0329. Epub 2014 Jul 21. Available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25046280

[3]Issue Brief, The Commonwealth Fund, 2014 May. “http://www.commonwealthfund.org/~/media/Files/Publications/Issue%20Brief/2014/May/1746_Ryan_adoption_use_hlt_IT_CHCs_rb.pdf

[4] Learn more about HHS’s work on Consumer Health IT at http://www.healthit.gov/policy-researchers-implementers/consumer-ehealth-program

Story

Data Science, Data Infrastructure, & Data Publications for the HHS IDEA Lab

Today I attended the HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank & Demo Day at the main HHS Headquarters in Washington, DC. See the Media Advisory, latest description of the HHS IDEA Lab, and the agenda for the demo day below.

I spoke with one of the "Shark Panelists", Dr. Taha Kass-Hout, about our upcoming FDA Data Innovation Lab and Predictive Analytics Meetup on October 6th and the FDA Data Innovation Lab Visualization Gallery we have produced for 41 FDA data sets.

I also spoke with HHS IDEA Lab Director and CTO, Bryan Sivak, about a Meetup on December 1st for the HHS Innovator Community at the Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup. Earlier aPAWG 2014, I discussed with Damon Davis, Health Data Initiative Director, that because 5 parts of HHS (CDC, FDA, AHRQ, NIH, and OASPR) have agreed to comply with the so-called “Whitehouse Science Advisor John Holdren Memo” to make their research data sets available to the public, we are working on linking the site map contents across those agencies.

So I put together a draft agenda for the December 1st Meetup by inviting the two best data-driven applications I heard as follows:

  • 6:30 p.m. Welcome and Introduction – Report on Recent HHS IDEA Lab Demo Meeting with Bryan Sivak (invited) and Damon Davis (invited) and HHS Data Science Data Publication Tutorial Slides
  • 6:45 p.m.​ GINAS: Advancing FDA's Ingredient Information System, Noel Southall (invited), National Institutes of Health (also FDA involved)
    • FDA has articulated its vision for a next-generation data system that serves as the central clearing house for ingredients in medical products. Meanwhile, the National Center for Advancing Translational Science at NIH has created its own substance tracking system to facilitate research efforts. Working with the FDA, this NIH team will test their software as a solution in the FDA environment.
  • 7:30 p.m. Brief Member Introductions and Refreshment Break
  • 7:45 p.m Fostering Scientific Insight through Data Federation, Brock Smith (invited), National Institutes of Health
    • This cross-departmental team consisting of individuals representing NIH, FDA and CDC recognizes a problem affecting scientists and their research goals. Because of the breadth and variety of resources, NIH researchers have difficulty synthesizing existing public data with their internally produced research findings and thus can easily lose valuable scientific insight. The team is testing the value of a web platform called SEMOSS that is designed to aggregate existing, fragmented health data while leveraging data analytic and visualization tools to enable scientists’ intuitive analysis and synthesis in their research.
  • 8:30 p.m. Open Discussion
  • 8:45 p.m. Networking
  • 9:00 p.m. Depart

We will be doing data science on the data sets being used in the NIH/FDA GINAS and NIH/FDA SEMOSS Data Federation and Analytics in preparation for this December 1st meetup and all are welcome to participate.

The HHS IDEA Lab is cultivating innovation for a more modern and effective government. They are striving to better harness the talent of the workforce at HHS and remove barriers HHS employees are faced with so they can act. They are doing this through a three pronged approach: 

  • Encouraging internal entrepreneurship by investing in HHS employees;
  • Recognizing they don’t have all the answers inside government and are bringing in external talent to help; and
  • Building communities of like-minded people across HHS to take on issues of strategic importance.

Dependent on the starting point, they want to help HHS Employees formulate, test, measure and possibly scale your idea. 
 
In their own words: To put it bluntly, we want to take on the hard problems – like procurement, paperwork reduction act, and open data – and make them strengths of the Department. You can get involved right away!  We are accepting applications for HHS Ignite, our internal accelerator for new ideas October 1 – 31, 2014. Participants of HHS Ignite have 3 months to flesh out their idea and test their solution to a vexing problem before presenting their product and results to Senior Leadership and pitching for continued funding and support.

So our Meetup is supporting the FDA Data Innovation Lab and the HHS Idea Lab by having two Meetups in the next three months (October 6th and December 1st). We are encouraging entrepreneurship, bringing external talent to help, and building communities of like-minded people.

Media Advisory

Source: Email September 25, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
September 25, 2014 
Contact: 
Steven Randazzo
202-260-6568
Steven.Randazzo@hhs.gov

Media Advisory for September 30, 2014, 10:30AM – 12:30AM

HHS IDEA Lab Hosts Demo Day for 11 Teams to Pitch Potentially Game-Changing Projects for Continued Support to HHS Senior Leadership

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) IDEA Lab is hosting the HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank and Demo Day on September 30, 2014 from 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM. Teams from the Department’s internal accelerator will present findings and demo prototypes for additional support to HHS senior leadership, including CTO Bryan Sivak, Assistant Secretary for Administration Ned Holland, Director for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Richard Kronick and Administrator for the Health Resources and Services Administration Mary Wakefield. The purpose of the internal accelerator is to find and test new solutions to important problems in government and health care. Projects cover areas from open data, to process improvement, to the testing of new technologies in government.

WHO: Bryan Sivak, HHS Chief Technology Officer and Entrepreneur in Residence

Ned Holland, Assistant Secretary for Administration 

Richard Kronick, Director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

WHAT: HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank and Demo Day featuring 11 teams participating in the Department’s internal accelerator for new ideas, HHS Ignite.  Teams have been working for three months to test and prove their ideas that have the potential to dramatically improve how the government operates. Teams will present their findings and pitch to HHS senior leadership for continued support in this rapid-fire format. More information on HHS Ignite can be found at http://hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite

The HHS IDEA Lab supports people and projects working to create a more efficient and effective government for a more modern health and human services system. Learn more about the IDEA Lab at http://hhs.gov/idealab

WHEN: September 30, 2014, 10:30AM – 12:30PM ET

WHERE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Hubert Humphrey Building,             
200 Independence Ave S.W. Washington, DC 
Room 800 (top floor)

What is the HHS IDEA Lab?

Source: September 30, 2014 Email

Across our 11 agencies, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is teeming with talented individuals who work to protect the health of the American people and provide critical human services.
 
Many of these individuals have new ideas or have identified game-changing solutions to problems in government and health care but have no way of acting on them.

That’s where the HHS IDEA Lab comes in.
 
At the HHS IDEA Lab we are cultivating innovation for a more modern and effective government. We are striving to better harness the talent of the workforce at HHS and remove barriers HHS employees are faced with so they can act. We are doing this through a three pronged approach: 

  • We are encouraging internal entrepreneurship by investing in HHS employees;
  • We recognize that we don’t have all the answers inside government and are bringing in external talent to help; and
  • We are building communities of like-minded people across HHS to take on issues of strategic importance.

Dependent on the starting point, we want to help HHS Employees formulate, test, measure and possibly scale your idea. 
 
To put it bluntly, we want to take on the hard problems – like procurement, paperwork reduction act, and open data – and make them strengths of the Department.
 
You can get involved right away!  We are accepting applications for HHS Ignite, our internal accelerator for new ideas October 1 – 31, 2014. Participants of HHS Ignite have 3 months to flesh out their idea and test their solution to a vexing problem before presenting their product and results to Senior Leadership and pitching for continued funding and support.
 
Our goal at the HHS IDEA Lab is to create a more modern and effective government. See if you can help and become part of the HHS community of innovators.

The HHS IDEA Lab Shark Tank & Demo Day

Source: http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/2014/09/2...tank-demo-day/

When: Tuesday | September 30, 2014 |10:30am – 3:30pm ET

Where: Hubert H Humphrey Building, Top Floor: Room 800 200 Independence Ave SW, Washington, D.C.

The Panelists (Our ‘Sharks’)

Ned Holland, HHS Assistant Secretary for Administration
Richard Kronick, Director, AHRQ
Rebecca Spitzgo, Director, Bureau of Health Workforce, HRSA
Taha Kass-Hout, Chief Health Informatics Officer, FDA
Mark Rohrbaugh, Director, Office for Technology Transfer, NIH
Juliana Cyril, Director, Office of Technology & Innovation, CDC
Emily Barson, Principle Deputy Director, HHS Intergovernmental & External Affairs
Richard Aragon, Director, HHS/ASFR Division of Program Integrity Integration & Oversight
Dean Chang, Vice President of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, University of Maryland
In the morning, hear the 11 teams pitch their projects.

Teams will have a 4 minute presentation followed by 5 minutes of QnA with their panel of Sharks. Slides and Video allowed. It’ll be casual enough for you to come in and out easily. Oh, and we’ll have coffee.

Presentations

Improving Access to Health Care Using a Fast Track System

Hospitals of the Indian Health Service (IHS) have constant issues of long wait times and an overcrowded Emergency Department, in part because many tribal patients use the Emergency Department of IHS hospitals as walk-in clinics for non-emergency issues. This team from the Whiteriver Indian Hospital, a rural IHS hospital located in the White Mountains of Arizona serving approximately 17,000 tribal members, is exploring new Emergency Department intake processes with the goal of reducing wait times and providing higher quality care to those they serve.

Presented by: Marliza Rivera, Indian Health Service

Revisiting an Annual Report to Congress

The Quality and Disparities Report (QDR) is an annual report from AHRQ to Congress on national trends in the quality of health care and the prevailing race and socioeconomic disparities in health care delivery. The QDR tracks and reports on more than 250 health and health care performance measures from more than 45 data sources. It currently takes more than a year to produce these annual reports. This team is testing the value of certain formats and features of the report in order to increase the report’s value-adding elements while redirecting efforts away from less pertinent elements.

Presented by: Elizabeth Bishop, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Student Loan Data Sharing with the Department of Education

HRSA’s Bureau of Clinician Recruitment and Service administer four Loan Repayment Programs (LRPs): The National Health Service Corps, the Nurse Corps, the Students-to-Service LRP, and the Faculty LRP. All programs require that eligible education loans be submitted for review through the HRSA, which houses the LRP online application and review functionalities. Review of loan documents, against information provided by applicants, has proven to be a lengthy, cumbersome task. In 2013, more than 70,000 loan documents were reviewed manually by analysts. However, recent findings suggest that 80% of loans submitted by HRSA were actually administered by the US Department of Education.

This cross-federal team will pilot a data sharing technology implementation between HRSA and the Department of Education in order to automate processes that are currently done manually. The long-term vision of this effort is to integrate the National Student Loan Data System with the BCRS Management Information System Solution in order to electronically receive the data needed to verify loan eligibility.

Presented by: Jamie Elliot, Health Resources and Services Administration

Upgrading the Genetic Variable Search

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) have collection of DNA and genetic datasets.  NHANES genetic data is restricted thus available through a proposal process.   Lists of NHANES genetic variables are available via PDF which does not meet the current and future needs of researchers.  This team is testing the value of an online searchable database that would increase accessibility and will allow for more research using NHANES genetic data.

Presented by: Jody McLean, Centers for Disease Control & Prevention

Enhancing CMS Outreach with Coordination Solutions

CMS conducts nationwide educational outreach supporting the Health Insurance Marketplaces. Organizations across CMS are fragmented in the means by which they reach potential marketplace beneficiaries. In addition, there are few systems or resources enabling CMS outreach staff across (geographically or organizationally) distinct offices to be aware of each others’ efforts; thus, coordination of outreach efforts (e.g., mutually reinforcing messaging) is rare, often only possible through informal, circuitous, manual routing of questions and information. This team is testing the value of a platform offering multiple administrative features and resources including directories, events schedules, project plans, and reports.

Presented by: Jermaine Burkhalter, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Resourcing Community Ideas Regionally

HHS Regional Operating Divisions and Regional Staff Divisions are organizationally distinct but have many intersecting priorities and stakeholders in their given geographic areas. Problems in coordination across divisions result in inefficiencies and a lack of collaboration. This team led by SAMHSA staff from the Philadelphia regional office is testing a variety of communication processes that seek to reduce redundancy and improve clarity and consistency of messaging to internal and external stakeholders.

Presented by: Jean Bennett, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

The CDC Open Idea Lab

Operating within a large bureaucracy (CDC), the National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities is seizing on the opportunity to better support innovation from within its ranks and further engage the problem-solving and creative abilities of the agency’s staff. The team is testing the efficacy of educational and cultural programming, and organizational and physical safe spaces with the goal of empowering CDC staff and improving the likelihood and feasibility of internally-grown solutions.

Presented by: Erica Reott, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

GINAS: Advancing FDA's Ingredient Information System

FDA has articulated its vision for a next-generation data system that serves as the central clearing house for ingredients in medical products. Meanwhile, the National Center for Advancing Translational Science at NIH has created its own substance tracking system to facilitate research efforts. Working with the FDA, this NIH team will test their software as a solution in the FDA environment.

Presented by: Noel Southall, National Institutes of Health

Automatic X-Ray Screening for Rural Areas

Imaging scientists in the NIH National Library of Medicine have developed and are currently testing an algorithm that machine-detects tuberculosis by analyzing chest x-ray images. The algorithm has passed several early stages measuring accuracy and efficacy, but because imaging experts who are able to program the algorithm to read x-rays are not readily available in rural areas, further development is needed to make the tool intuitive to use in the field and by relatively untrained technicians. This team is testing the feasibility and value of the algorithm in the field, which may be achieved with the design of a user interface.

Presented by: Sameer Antani, National Institutes of Health

Fostering Scientific Insight through Data Federation

This cross-departmental team consisting of individuals representing NIH, FDA and CDC recognizes a problem affecting scientists and their research goals. Because of the breadth and variety of resources, NIH researchers have difficulty synthesizing existing public data with their internally produced research findings and thus can easily lose valuable scientific insight. The team is testing the value of a web platform called SEMOSS that is designed to aggregate existing, fragmented health data while leveraging data analytic and visualization tools to enable scientists’ intuitive analysis and synthesis in their research.

Presented by: Brock Smith, National Institutes of Health

Increasing NIH Clinical Center Research Interns and Internships

The NIH Clinical Center Office of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education has recognized an opportunity to increase the accessibility of internships to a broader pool of candidates by using remote technologies. The number of internship opportunities has gradually decreased due to lack of funding. The team is developing a standard procedure to be piloted and measured whereby remotely managed interns perform research with NIH Clinical Center health professionals, clinicians, and researchers. The ultimate goal would be to increase the research productivity at the NIH Clinical Center while simultaneously providing a vastly increased number of interns with a unique and specialized research experience.

Presented by: Terra Miller, National Institutes of Health

In the afternoon, it'll be more casual.

Hang around or stop by for any bit of time in the afternoon. This is also open to everyone.

12:30pm-2:00pm ET: Coffee and Networking
Open House! Come meet the Ignite teams and IDEA Lab staff.

2:00pm-3:30pm ET: Panel Discussions
Join a discussions on “Innovating in Government” with current and past Ignite teams.

Hope you can join us!

HHS Ignite Application

Source: http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/what-we-do/hhs-ignite/

Eligibility

All HHS employees are eligible to apply to get into the Incubator. Teams of up to 5 may include individuals from outside of HHS or from outside government. However, Project Leads must be a full-time employee (FTE) of the Department.

Teams should collectively hold the skillsets and expertise to act on their ideas starting on day 1.

We Begin Accepting Proposals Again in October, 2014

Proposals for the most recent round of HHS Ignite support were accepted from March 3 through March 28th of 2014. Folks on the HHS network can browse all submitted proposals (link only available for HHS employees).

We will begin accepting proposals for the Winter 2015 Class of Ignite (which runs from January to April 2015) on October 1, 2014. Please stay tuned for more information as that date approaches.

Interested in Applying?

We begin accepting applications on October 1st. On that day, we’ll provide a link here that will take you to a different webpage with a simple form to complete there. You’ll hit submit and then we’ll send you a confirmation email.

The proposal will ask you the following questions:

  • Executive Summary (Your Elevator Pitch) [ 500 characters ]
  • What’s the problem you’ve identified? [ 2000 characters ]
  • What’s your proposed solution? What do want to accomplish within the 3 months? [ 1000 characters ]
  • Who is your target end-user / customer? [ 75 characters ]
  • Is there any other information you’d like us to know about? (optional) [ 500 characters ]

The Scoring Criteria and Selection Process

Proposals submitted into Ventures are evaluated by a panel of Reviewers based on the following criteria:

  • The project’s importance to the Office, Agency and/or Department [20 points]
  • The potential impact of the proposed solution. [40 points]
  • The proposal’s understanding and explanation of the problem that needs to be solved. [20 points]
  • The proposal’s understanding of the customers that the project serves. [20 points]

Teams submitting the top proposals will be asked to present and discuss their project with members of the HHS Innovation Council. The Council will make recommendations to the Secretary who will make the final selection. For a schedule of the selection please click on the “Key Dates” tab above.

Story

Data Science for the HHS IDEA LAB and Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases Fellowship: My Tribute to George Thomas

Announcing Health  United States 2013   HealthData.gov.png

This story started with attending the ​HDC Webinar: The HHS HDI Strategy & Execution Plan and reading The New HHS Health Data Strategy and Execution Plan. Then I applied for the Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases Fellowship.

While I am waiting to hear back about the Fellowship, I decided to do some Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases starting with the HHS IDEA LAB.

Mining their web site, it is apparent the following are linked: The PeopleThe ProjectsOur Pathways, and The Blog  (79 Blogs), but exactly how? Could a Data Scientists like myself construct a table that captures those linkages? That is a good and useful challenge to show my capabilities and could be a pilot of the bigger project across HHS.

I found that the first statement: "help plan and organize a scheme to interlink all governmental computers for public access" and the second statement: "create a solution to HHS's current problem of multiple, disparate data sources" that need "data linkages across the organization", seem to be inconsistent. I interpret the problem statement as that of federating selected information (scientific research information and open data) on HHS computers so it looks like it originated from one place, but actually resides with its originators who maintain it. The best example of this I know of in the Federal Government, and have worked with, is the Annual Statistical Abstract of the Census Bureau based on inputs for over 200 statistical programs in over 70 agencies. The best example that HHS has appears to be their Health United States 2013 produced by the CDC.

So lets do some Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases for the IDEA LAB and Health United States 2013. And then lets make them Data Publications for Data Browsers.

The approach the IDEA Lab takes is based on four tenets:

  • Innovation is a direct result of the freedom to experiment.
  • Design is critical to effectively communicate ideas.
  • Entrepreneurship allows us to take advantage of underutilized talent.
  • Action, above all else, is encouraged.

Data Dictionary

 

Term Explanation Definition Comment
Presidential Innovation Fellows PIF The Presidential Innovation Fellows (PIF) program pairs top innovators from the private sector, non-profits, and academia with top innovators in government to collaborate during focused 6-13 month “tours of duty” to develop solutions that can save lives, save taxpayer money, and fuel job creation.  
Sammies The Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals (Sammies) The Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals (Sammies) pay tribute to America’s dedicated federal workforce, highlighting those who have made significant contributions to our country. Honorees are chosen based on their commitment and innovation, as well as the impact of their work on addressing the needs of the nation.  
HHS Innovates Celebrating HHS Trailblazers HHS Innovates is aimed at building a culture of innovation at the Department through facilitating the exchange of innovative ideas.  This contest recognizes and rewards good ideas, and also helps promote them across the Department. To date, HHS employees have submitted nominations of innovations for nearly 500 exciting new staff-driven innovations, and our employees have cast over 60,000 votes during the community-voting phase.
HHS Entrepreneurs Paring Internal Ideas with External Expertise Pairing Internal Ideas with External Expertise. Established in 2012, HHS Entrepreneurs was the model for the Presidential Innovation Fellows Program. HHS has worked to attract entrepreneurial talent to create a culture that supports intelligent risk-taking and accelerates innovation.​ This pathway partners federal staff working on high-risk, high-reward projects with external entrepreneurs for a 12-month fellowship.
HHS Innovator-In-Residence Solving Shared Problems Through Partnerships The HHS Innovator-in-Residence is a partnership in which private, not-for-profit organizations sponsor a position to be filled by an individual with an entrepreneurial and innovative background to work on a problem of common interest to HHS and the partner organization.  
HHS Ignite Incubating New Ideas HHS Ignite catalyzes early-stage project ideas that can be completed within very compressed time frames. Teams selected into HHS Ignite are guaranteed an appropriate amount of their time to complete the project. By exposing teams to a network of innovators and equipping them with the methodologies and tools used by successful startup companies, HHS Ignite provides a space in which small teams can try something new in a startup environment.​
HHS Ventures Accelerating Proven Concepts    
HHS Competes New Approaches to Problem Solving    
HHS Connects Working Toward the Frictionless Exchange of Ideas    
HHS Health Data Initiative LIberating Data For Health Care Transformation    

 

People

I designed this linked data table so I could visualize the attributes of the People in Spotfire Filters.

 

Section Name and Organization Category Pathway Project
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Lucky,​ HHS IDEA Lab Blog   NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Cassandra Duarte,​ HHS IDEA Lab Ignites HHS Entrepreneurs NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Julie Herron, HHS IDEA Lab Blog   NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Sandeep Patel,​ HHS IDEA Lab Data HHS Competes NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Will Yang, HHS IDEA Lab Ignites HHS Ignites NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Damon Davis, HHS IDEA Lab Data HHS Data NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Elizabeth Kittrie, HHS IDEA Lab Innovates HHS Innovates NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Bryan Sivak, HHS IDEA Lab Director Author NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Read Holman, HHS IDEA Lab Ignites HHS Ignites NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Steven Randazzo, HHS IDEA Lab Blog   NA
HHS IDEA Lab Staff Greg Downing, HHS IDEA Lab Blog   NA
HHS Entrepreneurs Chris Lunt, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services     Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility
HHS Entrepreneurs Frank Sanborn, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response     NA
HHS Entrepreneurs Kevin Larsen, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT     NA
HHS Entrepreneurs Amy Sherwood, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services     Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act
HHS Entrepreneurs Mindy Hangsleben, ONC for Health IT   HHS Ignites Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act
HHS Entrepreneurs Mindy Hangsleben, ONC for Health IT   HHS Ignites Increasing Efficiency in Rule Making with Natural Language Processing
HHS Entrepreneurs Zachery Jiwa, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services     Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility
HHS Entrepreneurs David Cartier, Health Resources and Services Administration     NA
HHS Innovates Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living   HHS Ignites Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s
HHS Innovates Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living   HHS Ignites Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR)
HHS Innovates Claro Yu, National Institutes of Health     NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars
HHS Innovates Debra J. Grabowski, Indian Health Service     Online Food Handler Training Project
HHS Innovates Eric S. Weiss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter
HHS Innovates Gwen Shinko, National Institutes of Health     NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars
HHS Innovates Ivor D’Souza, National Institutes of Health     Electronic Patient Tracking in Disasters
HHS Innovates James Onken, National Institutes of Health     NIH RePORT: Public Access to Research
HHS Innovates Joyce E. B. Backus, National Institutes of Health     MedlinePlus Connect
HHS Innovates Juliette S. Kendrick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Education Through Wireless SMS
HHS Innovates Kathy Slawson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Piloting Green Laboratories
HHS Innovates Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service     Portal System: Linking Healthcare Clinics
HHS Innovates Lynn Sokler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs
HHS Innovates Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health     The National Database for Autism Research
HHS Innovates Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration     The 100k Genome Project
HHS Innovates Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health     Joining Forces to Fight Childhood Obesity
HHS Innovates Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration     NA
HHS Innovates Richard Schieber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs
HHS Innovates Stacey Mattison, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Making the Link Between Public Health & Aging
HHS Innovates Manuel B. Datiles III, National Institutes of Health     From Outer Space to the Eye Clinic
HHS Innovator-in-Residence Nag Murty, West Health / IDEA Lab     Project Boundary
HHS Innovator-in-Residence Nag Murty, West Health / IDEA Lab     Project Sandbox
HHS Innovator-in-Residence Pierce Graham-Jones, ​HHS IDEA Lab     Automate Blue Button Initiative
HHS Innovator-in-Residence Pierce Graham-Jones, ​HHS IDEA Lab     Health Data Consortium Affiliates Network
HHS Innovator-in-Residence Pierce Graham-Jones, ​HHS IDEA Lab     The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge
Presidential Innovation Fellows Adam Dole, ONC for Health IT     Blue Button Project
Presidential Innovation Fellows Nayan Jain, ONC for Health IT     Blue Button Project
Presidential Innovation Fellows Sean Herron, Food and Drug Administration     openFDA
Sammies Julie Segre, National Institutes of Health     Superbug Code Breakers
Sammies Nora D. Volkow, National Institutes of Health     Moving Drug Addiction Science into the Mainstream
Sammies Tara Palmore, National Institutes of Health     Superbug Code Breakers
Sammies Hamid Jafari, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Creating a Polio-Free World
Sammies Michael Gottesman, National Institutes of Health     Anti-Cancer Research
Sammies J. Todd Weber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention     Stopping a Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

Projects

I designed this linked data table so I could link to the Projects below,​ visualize the attributes of the Projects in Spotfire Filters, and link out to the Related Links.

 

Project Category Members Related Links
Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act HHS Entrepreneurs

INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Farzad Mostashari, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT; Jacob Reider, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT; Kevin Larsen, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Mindy Hangsleben and Amy Sherwood

 
Anti-Cancer Research Sammies   WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Application of Design Thinking to Grants HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Kathleen Chiarantona, Administration for Children and Families; Blair Corcoran, Administration for Children and Families; Stan Koustaal, Administration for Children and Families; Amelia Popham, Administration for Children and Families; and Keyon Smith, Administration for Children and Families. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR: Jared Goralnick and Amy Ng WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Automate Blue Button Initiative Innovator in Residence    
Blue Button Project Presidential Innovation Fellow Presidential Innovation Fellows: Adam Dole and Nayan Jain  
Bridging the CHASM of Health Disparities HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Kimberly Elenberg, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Carol Lincoln, Indian Health Service; MaryAnn Veitch, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Calvin Edwards, Food and Drug Administration; Alan Parham, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Christopher McGee, U.S. Bureau of Prisons; and David Morrissette, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  
Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Richard Schieber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Lynn Sokler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;  Ronald Campbell, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Carol Crawford, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Tom Skinner, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Karen Resha, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and Barbara Bowman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
Building Health Resilience Technology to Withstand Natural Disasters HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Nicole Luire, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness & Response; Phil Ferro, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness & Response; Patrick Hart, Federal Emergency Management Agency; Ted Okada, Federal Emergency Management Agency. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Frank Sanborn  
CDCOLOGY: A Microtasking Project HHS Ignite TEAM MEMBERS: Diana Yassanye (Project Lead), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Chelsea Cipriano, Department of Health and Human Services; James Rajotte, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Jacinta Smith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Serena Vinter, Public Health Analyst, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Cloud-Based GIS Maps Displaying Aggregate Data on Medical Malpractice HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Ernia Hughes, Health Resources and Services Administration; Seth Marcus, Health Resources and Services Administration; Harnam Singh, Health Resources and Services Administration. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR: Krishna Malyala WATCH RELATED VIDEO
CMS Coordinated Press Response Strategy HHS Ignite TEAM MEMBERS: Emma Sandoe (Project Lead), Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Keya Joy-Bush, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Rachel Maisler, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Tony Salters, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Brian Cook, Director, Media Relations Group, Office of Communications, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Connecting Kids with Dental Care HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Terri Lynn Cohen, Health Resources and Services Administration; Nancy Goetschius, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; James Resnick, Health Resources and Services Administration; Sanjoy Chakraborty, Health Resources and Services Administration; Keith Adams, SAIC; and Barbara Gandy, SAIC  
Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living; Jennifer Watson, National Institutes of Health; Nina Silverberg, National Institutes of Health; and Kate Gordon, RTI International  
Creating De-Identified Claims Data HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Niall Brennan, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Andy Shatto, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Chris Cox, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Allison Oelschlaeger, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; and Kari Gaare, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services  
Creating a Polio-Free World Sammies NA  
Data-Driven Website Optimization Using Multivariate Testing HHS Ignite Team Members: Achaia Walton (Project Lead), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs; Nicholas Garlow, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs; Beth Liu, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs; and Karen Silver, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Andrew Wilson, Content Manager, Digital Strategy Group, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Julie Boughn, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Jessica Kahn, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Henry Chao, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; amd Elaine Olin, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.  EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Zac Jiwa and Chris Lunt  
Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why? HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Scott Cory, Administration for Community Living; and Jason Bennett, Administration for Community Living  
Developing a Data-Driven ACF Workforce HHS Ignite Team Members: Heather Swope (Project Lead), Administration for Children & Families; Valeria Fajardo, Administration for Children & Families; Kurt Heisler, Administration for Children & Families; Melinda Baldwin, Administration for Children & Families; and Paul Kirisitz, Administration for Children & Families. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Brett Brown, Social Science Research Analyst, Administration for Children, Youth & Families, Administration for Children & Families WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Education Through Wireless SMS HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Juliette Kendrick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Yvonne Green, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Sabrina Matoff-Stepp, Health Resources and Services Administration; Judy Meehan, National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coaltion; Paul Meyer, Voxivia, Inc.; Valerie Scardino, Department of Health and Human Services; and Paul Stange, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
Electronic Health Records in Action HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: John Redd, Indian Health Service; Jim Check, Indian Health Service; Terry Cullen, Indian Health Service; Larry Layne, Indian Health Service; Amy Groom, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Jim Hayslett, Indian Health Service' and James Keck, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
Electronic Patient Tracking in Disasters HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Ivor D’Souza, National Institutes of Health; Wei Ma, National Institutes of Health; Cindy Notobartolo, John Hopkins School of Medicine; Laura Lee, National Institutes of Health; Chandra Kola, National Institutes of Health; David Zhang, National Institutes of Health; and Dwight Clarke, National Institutes of Health  
Electronic Tracking & Transport of the Nation’s Organ Transplant System HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Joyce Somsak, Health Resources and Services Administration; and Richard Durbin, Health Resources and Services Administration. EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR: David Cartier  
Fast-Screening CE-MS Method for Bacteria Through Protein Pattern Recognition HHS Ignite Team Members: Jose Moreno (Project Lead), Food and Drug Administration; Jose Velez, Food and Drug Administration; Fernando Gonzalez, Food and Drug Administration; Hector Espinet, Food and Drug Administration; Osvaldo Rosario, Food and Drug Administration; and Joseph Bloom, Food and Drug Administration. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Adaberto Cajibas, Supervisory Chemist, Office of Regulatory Affairs, Food and Drug Administration WATCH RELATED VIDEO
FDA-iRISK: A Fast Tool for Food Safety HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Sherri Dennis, Food and Drug Administration; Yuhuan Chen, Food and Drug Administration; Susan Cahill, Food and Drug Administration; Anne-Marie St-Laurent, Canadian Food Inspection Agency; Kyle McKillop, Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition; Greg Paoli, Risk Science International; and Stephen Beaulieu, RTI International  
FDA-TRACK Gallery Submissions HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Timothy Kiang, Food and Drug Administration; Kelly McReynolds, Food and Drug Administration; Giles Mills, Food and Drug Administration; Tiffany Yu, Food and Drug Administration; Tiffany Clark, Food and Drug Administration; Ann Vale, Food and Drug Administration; and Kari Schraf, Food and Drug Administration WATCH RELATED VIDEO
FDA’s Anti-Counterfeit Device HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Nicola Tanieri, Food and Drug Administration; Diane Lirhus, Food and Drug Administration; Elizabeth MacCorkell, Food and Drug Administration; Marcus Fairconnetue, Food and Drug Administration; Mark Witkowski, Food and Drug Administration; Elsie Figueroa, Food and Drug Administration; and Fred Fricke, Food and Drug Administration  
Forming Partnerships to Develop Lifesaving Technologies NA NA  
From Outer Space to the Eye Clinic HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Manuel Datiles, National Institutes of Health; Rafat Ansari, National Aeronautics and Space Administration; J. Samuel Zigler, John Hopkins University; and Frederic Ferris, National Institutes of Health  
Getting more out of Video: NLM Video Search HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: John Doyle, National Institutes of Health; Simon Liu, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Edward Luczak, National Institutes of Health; Wei Ma, National Institutes of Health; Jennifer Marill, National Institutes of Health; John Rees, National Institutes of Health; and Doron Shalvi, National Institutes of Health WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Health Data Consortium Affiliates Network Innovator in Residence NA  
Health Information Exchange Accelerators HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Claudia Williams, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT; Erica Galvez, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT; and Paul Tuten, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Healthcare Practitioner Credentialing Portal HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration; Ernia Hughes, Health Resources and Services Administration; Cynthia Grubbs, Health Resources and Services Administration; Thomas Sowinski,  Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General; Tina Fuchs, Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General; Jill Wright, Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General; Richard Gilbert, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; and Zabeen Chong, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services  
IHS Workforce Development: Going Lean to Understand Needs HHS Ignite Team Members: John Shutze (Project Lead), Indian Health Service; Bruce Finke, Indian Health Service; Scott McCoy, Indian Health Service; Harry Brown, Indian Health Service; and Tim Ricks, Director, Nashville Area Office, Indian Health Service WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information HHS Entrepreneurs NA  
Improving Health & Stability in Food Choices NA NA  
Increasing Efficiency in Rule Making with Natural Language Processing HHS Ignite Team Members: Oliver Potts (Project Lead), HHS Office of the Secretary; Katerina Horska, HHS Office of the Secretary; Sheila Bayne, HHS Office of the Secretary; Emma Di Mantova, HHS Office of the Secretary; Mindy Hangsleben, HHS Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT; Jim Wickliffe, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Martique Jones, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Craig Lafond, HHS Office of the Secretary; Kristin Tensuan, Environmental Protection Agency; and Bryant Crowe, Environmental Protection Agency. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Jennifer Cannistra, Executive Secretary, Immediate Office of the Secretary, HHS Office of the Secretar WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENRURS: Damon Davis, HHS IDEA LAB; and Cynthia Colton, Office of the Chief Information Officer  
Integrating Health Insurance Marketplace Data to Visualize Efforts and Impact HHS Ignite Team Members: Stephanie Magill (Project Lead), Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Bob Adams, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Marni Land, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services; and Jermaine Burkhalter, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: John Hammarlund, Regional Administrator, CMS Regions V and X WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Joining Forces to Fight Childhood Obesity HHS Innovates TEAM MEMERS: Laura Kettel Kahan, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health; Tracy Orleans, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Molly Kretsch, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Terry T-K Huang, University of Nebraska; and Todd Phillips, Academy for Educational Development  
Leveraging the Public to Catch Fugitives HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Roberta Baskin, Office of the Inspector General; Erin Fuchs, Office of the Inspector General; and Jessica Long, Office of the Inspector General  
Lighting the Way: NIOSH Cap Lamp HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: John Sammarco, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Miguel Reyes, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Timothy Matty, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Sean Gallagher, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Timothy Lutz, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and Grant King, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
Making the Link Between Public Health & Aging HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Letia Boseman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Jeffery Hall, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Kristine Day, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Andree Harris, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Jason Lang, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and Stacey Mattison, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
MedlinePlus Connect HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Joyce Backus, National Institutes of Health; Stephanie Dennis, National Institutes of Health; Naomi Miller, National Institutes of Health; Joseph Potvin, National Institutes of Health; Serena Burgess, National Institutes of Health; and Maxine Rockoff, Columbia University  
Million Hearts Initiative HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Michael Schooley, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Peter Briss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; James Galloway, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Judy Hannan, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Joseph McCannon, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Farzad Mostashari, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT; and Janet Wright, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools HHS Entrepreneurs NA  
Modernizing the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Peter Budetti,Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Zabeen Chong, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; and Richard Gilbert,  Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services WATCH RELATED VIDEO
MONAHRQ – My Own Network, powered by AHRQ HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Carol Sneigoski, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality; Anne Elixhauser, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality; and Teressa Fraze, Thomson Reuters Health Care  
Moving Drug Addiction Science into the Mainstream Sammies NA  
Moving Towards Energy Efficient NIH Laboratories HHS Ignite Team Members: Leo Gumapas (Project Lead), National Institutes for Health; Rajib Chainani, National Institutes for Health; Sy Sadighi, National Institutes for Health; and Don Guan, National Institutes for Health. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Susan Hinton, Division of Environmental Protection, Office of Research Facilities, Office of the Director, National Institutes for Health WATCH RELATED VIDEO
NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Jason Barnett, National Institutes of Health; Gwen Shinko, National Institutes of Health; and Claro Yu, National Institutes of Health WATCH RELATED VIDEO
NIH RePORT: Public Access to Research HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: James Onken, National Institutes of Health; Salley Rockey, National Institutes of Health; Radha Allam, NETE Solutions; Sanjay Naik, NETE Solutions; and Sandeep Somaiya, NETE Solutions  
Online Food Handler Training Project HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Robert Bates, Indian Health Service; Tom Candelaria, Indian Health Service; Jeff Dickson, Indian Health Service; Debra Grabowski, Indian Health Service; and Katie Hubbard, Indian Health Service  
openFDA Presidential Innovation Fellow Presidential Innovation Fellow: Sean Herron  
Stopping a Fungal Meningitis Outbreak Sammies NA WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Piloting Green Laboratories HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Sandy Steiner, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ; Sandy Martin, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and Kathy Slawson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
Superbug Code Breakers Sammies NA WATCH RELATED VIDEO and WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Portal System: Linking Healthcare Clinics HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Robert Gemmell, Indian Health Service; Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service; Steve Riggio, Indian Health Service; and Beverly Miller, Indian Health Service WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Supporting Tribal Grantees: ACF Makes it Simple HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Nanette Bishop, Administration for Children and Families; and Dana Huckabee, Administration for Children and Families  
Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: David Daigle, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Margaret Silver, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Ali Khan, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and Catherine Jamal, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  
The 100k Genome Project HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Marc Allard, Food and Drug Administration; Eric Brown, Food and Drug Administration; David Lipman, National Institutes of Health; Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration; Steve Royce, Agilent Technologies; Bart Weimer, University of California Davis; and Paul Zavitsanos, Agilent Technologies WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Publication Planning & Clearance Process Improvement Project HHS Entrepreneurs INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS: Mark Weber, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs; Gloria Barnes, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs; and  Will Jenkins, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs WATCH RELATED VIDEO
The Body Weight Simulator HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Kevin Hall, National Institutes of Health; Carson Chow, National Institutes of Health; and Dhruva Chandramohan, Cornell University WATCH RELATED VIDEO
The CDC Health Game Jam 2013 HHS Ignite Team Members: Dan Baden (Project Lead), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Peter Jenkins, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Leigh Willis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Tom Savel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Ben Sawyer, RWJF’s Games for Health Project; Tony Tseng, Savannah College of Art and Design, Atlanta; Andrew Greenberg, Georgia Game Developers Association. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Kristin Brusuelas, Senior Liaison Officer, Office of State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Public Health Professionals, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention WATCH RELATED VIDEO
Ready, Cert, Go! HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Denise Wells, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; Antonia Harris, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; Kent Slakey, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; Linda Bishop-Milton, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; TJ Powers, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; Donna Sanders, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration; and Marcia Gosha-Caldell, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration  
The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Marcia Harris, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Cindy Hollerich, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Mike Sapko, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Eric Weiss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; and Floyd Varley, Yukon Zinc  
Project Boundary Innovator in Residence NA  
Project Sandbox Innovator in Residence NA  
The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge Innovator in Residence NA  
Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR) HHS Ignite Team Members: Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez (Project Lead), Administration for Community Living; Jennifer Watson, National Institutes of Health; Nina Silverberg, National Institutes of Health; Jane Tilly, Administration for Community Living; Kate Gordon, Administration for Community Living; Hunter McKay, Administration for Community Living;  and Angela Deokar, Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Aviva Sufian, Administration on Aging, Administration for Community Living WATCH RELATED VIDEO
The National Database for Autism Research HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Michelle Freund, National Institutes of Health; Daniel Hall, National Institutes of Health; Greg Farber, National Institutes of Health; and Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health  
Revolutionizing Procurement Through the Web HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Yang Fann, National Institutes of Health; Trissy Knox, National Institutes of Health; Gladys Wang, National Institutes of Health; Quynh Ly, National Institutes of Health; and Robert Dean, National Institutes of Health  
The National Health Service Corps Job Center HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration; John White, Health Resources and Services Administration; Prasad Bhalerao, Sapien; Shereef Henien, Sapien; and Mark Laurent, Sapien  
The NIH 3D Print Exchange HHS Ignite Team Members: Darrell Hurt (Project Lead), National Institutes for Health; Nick Weber, National Institutes for Health; Meghan Coakley, National Institutes for Health; Jeremy Swan, National Institutes for Health; Erin Fincher, National Institutes for Health; Terry Yoo, National Institutes for Health; David Chen, National Institutes for Health; and Vsevelod (Seva) Alekseyev. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Yentram Huyen, Chief, Bioinformatics and Computational Biosciences Branch, Office of Cyber Infrastructure and Computational Biology, Nat’l Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes for Health WATCH RELATED VIDEO
The NLM Pillbox: More Efficient Data Cleanup and Outputs HHS Ignite Team Members: David Hale (Project Lead), National Institutes of Health; Jennifer Dong, National Institutes of Health; Quynh Nguyen, National Institutes of Health; Ying Sun, National Institutes of Health; and Florence Chang, National Institutes of Health. Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor: Florence Chang, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health WATCH RELATED VIDEO
The Weight of the Nation Campaign HHS Innovates TEAM MEMBERS: Susan Yanovski, National Institutes of Health; Catherine Loria, National Institutes of Health; Susan Dambrauskas, National Institutes of Health; Jennifer Seymour, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; William Dietz, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; John Hoffman, HBO Documentary Films; and Judith Salerno, Institute of Medicine WATCH RELATED VIDEO

Blogs

I designed this linked data table so I could visualize the Blogs in a time series plot, link to the Titles below, and link out to the Author and Comment.

 

Date Title Author Comment
5/15/2014 WHY THE GOVERNMENT SHOULD HIRE MORE PRODUCT PEOPLE Jared Goralnick Building a Design-Minded and More Collaborative Office of Family Assistance Project
5/9/2014 APPLY NOW! HHS ENTREPRENEURS IS BACK AND LOOKING FOR TALENT! Bryan Sivak  
4/24/2014 INNOVATING TO TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE Nag Murty Innovator-in-Residence
4/10/2014 CALLING ALL CODERS! CODE-A-PALOOZA SUBMISSIONS NOW OPEN Dwayne Spradlin Code-a-Palooza
4/7/2014 PERSONALLY-GENERATED HEALTH DATA – THE NEXT FRONTIER Bryan Sivak  
3/7/2014 HHS IDEA LAB @ SXSW Steven Randazzo  
3/6/2014 HHS IGNITE: NOW ACCEPTING YOUR FUNDING PROPOSALS! Bryan Sivak Apply now!
3/1/2014 COME JOIN THE HHS IDEA LAB TEAM! APPLY TO BE THE NEXT HEALTH DATA INNOVATOR Steven Randazzo  
2/3/2014 HHS IGNITE INNOVATION DAY: JOIN US THIS FRIDAY! Read Holman  
9/27/2013 DATA FUELING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND HEALTH CARE TRANSFORMATION Bryan Sivak ChenMed
9/24/2013 PRA: THE GOVERNMENT’S MILLION DOLLAR SURVEY? Mindy Hangsleben Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995
9/24/2013 PRACTICE WHAT WE PREACH Kevin Larsen  
9/17/2013 DATA.CDC.GOV: ENERGIZING DATA TO BETTER TELL THE STORY Fred Smith Data.CDC.gov
7/17/2013 NOW SOLICITING FEEDBACK ON THE STRATEGIC VISION FOR INNOVATION AT THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Bryan Sivak  
6/27/2013 HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE SELECTED TEAMS & THE BANK OF IDEAS Bryan Sivak the 13 teams
6/27/2013 NOW OPEN! APPLY TO WORK ON HIGH IMPACT PROJECTS IN 2ND ANNUAL TALENT SEARCH FOR THE HHSENTREPRENEURS PROGRAM Bryan Sivak  
6/6/2013 HEALTH DATAPALOOZA IV TOPS OFF A HUGE YEAR IN HEALTH DATA LIBERATION & INNOVATION Bryan Sivak and Todd Park  
4/11/2013 MR. POTATOHEAD MEETS THE SECRETARY!!! Mindy Hangsleben  
4/11/2013 HHSIGNITES (BETA): THE WHAT’S AND WHY’S OF YOUR PROPOSAL Bryan Sivak HHSignites (beta)
3/21/2013 HHSIGNITES (BETA): AN INNOVATION SEED-FUNDING OPPORTUNITY Bryan Sivak HHSignites (beta)
3/19/2013 INNOVATION AND EXPERIMENTATION GOING VIRAL AT HHS Bryan Sivak HHSinnovates
2/28/2013 HHSINNOVATES PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD, VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE Bryan Sivak  
2/27/2013 COMMUNITY RESILIENCY Frank Sanborn  
2/11/2013 INNOVATION: LIVING SOCIAL PROCESS Chris Lunt  
2/4/2013 THE LEAN VIRUS HAS HIT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT…. KAIZEN! Mindy Hangsleben  
1/29/2013 INNOVATION 101 Zac Jiwa novelty
1/2/2013 YOU DON’T TRACK WHAT? David Cartier  
12/28/2012 MAP IT LIKE IT’S HOT!! Mindy Hangsleben  
12/17/2012 WELCOME TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT! Mindy Hangsleben  
12/12/2012 WHAT A PICTURE IS WORTH Chris Lunt  
12/10/2012 JUMPING IN FEET LAST Zac Jiwa  
10/9/2012 ROUND FIVE OF HHSINNOVATES CONCLUDES & LESSONS LEARNED Bryan Sivak  
9/7/2012 INNOVATION FELLOWS TECHNICAL ADVISORS: IMPORTANT COMPONENTS TO THE HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM Bryan Sivak Innovation Fellows Program
9/7/2012 FIRST-TIME PUBLIC VOTING FOR TOP HEALTH INNOVATIONS AT HHS, VOTE NOW! Bryan Sivak  
9/6/2012 NEW DIGITAL GOVERNMENT STRATEGY MAKES INFORMATION MORE USEFUL AND DYNAMIC Bryan Sivak Digital Government Strategy
9/6/2012 NEW INNOVATION OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCED! – HHS INNOVATION FELLOWS PROGRAM Bryan Sivak Innovations Fellows Program
6/19/2012 ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS ROCK 3RD ANNUAL HEALTH DATAPALOOZA Todd Park  
5/22/2012 THE GROWING ROLE FOR MOBILE PHONES IN PUBLIC HEALTH Audie Atienza  
4/16/2012 HEALTH TECHTALK George Thomas  
4/16/2012 WE’RE LAUNCHING HHS’ NEW OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN, VERSION 2.0 wpengine Version 2.0 of the HHS Open Government plan
3/23/2012 PROTECTING PRIVACY AND BUILDING TRUST AS MOBILE AND ONLINE HEALTH EVOLVE wpengine  
3/8/2012 TWO NEW WAYS FOR YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT wpengine Share your thoughts
3/5/2012 OBAMA ADMINISTRATION AND TEXT4BABY JOIN FORCES TO CONNECT PREGNANT WOMEN AND CHILDREN TO HEALTH COVERAGE AND INFORMATION wpengine  
2/17/2012 MHEALTH INNOVATION AND DEVELOPERS CHALLENGES Audie Atienza  
2/17/2012 CELEBRATING INNOVATIVE HEALTH PROMOTION APPS – WINNERS OF THE SG CHALLENGE Audie Atienza  
1/17/2012 HELP US DEVELOP OUR NEW OPEN GOV PLAN Todd Park “Version 1” of HHS’s Open Government Plan
1/13/2012 MHEALTH RESEARCH & EVALUATION: NEW OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES Audie Atienza  
12/6/2011 U.S. SURGEON GENERAL’S HEALTHY APP CHALLENGE wpengine National Prevention Strategy
11/30/2011 COMPLEXITIES AND CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPING MHEALTH PROGRAMS Audie Atienza Three Approaches to mHealth"
11/2/2011 CELEBRATING INNOVATION! APPS CHALLENGE WINNERS AT THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE Todd Park  
10/31/2011 ANNOUNCING THE LEADING HEALTH INDICATORS APPS CHALLENGE Todd Park  
10/26/2011 THREE APPROACHES TO MHEALTH Audie Atienza CTIA, 2011
9/26/2011 PROMOTING A “THINK DIFFERENTLY” ATTITUDE AT HHS E. J. Holland Jr.  
9/20/2011 HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CELEBRATES THE UNITED STATES’ ENTRY INTO THE OPEN GOVERNMENT PARTNERSHIP Todd Park Open Government Plan
9/19/2011 ADVANCING TEXT MESSAGING FOR HEALTH Todd Park  
9/2/2011 NEW YORK INCREASES ACCESS TO HEALTH DATA Nirav R. Shah, MD, MPH  
7/18/2011 THE POWER OF MANY: CROWDSOURCING OUR WAY TO SOLUTIONS Todd Park "Crowdsourcing” Forum
6/27/2011 JUNE 2011 OPEN GOVERNMENT PROGRESS REPORT RELEASE Todd Park Progress Report on our Open Government Plan
6/6/2011 CALLING ALL HEALTH INNOVATORS: HEALTH DATA PALOOZA LIVE JUNE 9TH Todd Park The Health Data Initiative
4/28/2011 GREATLY IMPROVED PUBLIC REPORTING OF HHS GRANTS DATA Todd Park TAGGS – the Tracking Accountability in Government Grants System (TAGGS)
3/31/2011 ADDING VALUE AT HHS THROUGH INNOVATION Todd Park HHSinnovates program
3/25/2011 HELP SHAPE THE NEW FEDERAL HEALTH IT STRATEGIC PLAN Todd Park  
3/18/2011 CELEBRATING SUNSHINE WEEK AT HHS Todd Park Open Government Plan
2/16/2011 WELCOME TO HEALTHDATA.GOV! Todd Park HealthData.gov
10/17/2010 ADVANCING A CULTURE OF INNOVATION AT HHS Todd Park HHSinnovates
9/21/2010 THE NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE’S NEW API PORTAL Todd Park NLM Application Web Portal
8/9/2010 HHSINNOVATES AWARDS PROGRAM Todd Park HHSinnovates awards program
7/21/2010 STRATEGIC PLAN wpengine  
7/9/2010 NOW PLAYING: NEW DEVELOPER CHALLENGES USING HEALTH DATA! Todd Park  
6/25/2010 HHS'S OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN: VERSION 1.1 Todd Park version 1.1 of our Open Government Plan
6/22/2010 SECRETARY’S INNOVATION AWARDS PROGRAM – HHSINNOVATES! Todd Park  
6/1/2010 HHS AND INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE PROMOTE COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA INITIATIVE Todd Park Community Health Data Initiative
5/27/2010 COMMUNITY HEALTH DATA FORUM: HARNESSING THE POWER OF INFORMATION TO IMPROVE HEALTH Todd Park Community Health Data Initiative
5/4/2010 DESIGN FOR AMERICA – VISUALIZING HEALTH DATA TO INSPIRE COMMUNITY ACTION wpengine Design for America
5/3/2010 SECRETARY KATHLEEN SEBELIUS’S ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY Todd Park Strategic Initiatives and Key Inter-Agency Collaborations
4/7/2010 HHS OPEN GOVERNMENT PLAN Todd Park  
3/25/2010 FOLKS HAVE POSTED TERRIFIC OPEN GOVERNMENT THOUGHTS Todd Park  
3/1/2010 OPEN GOVERNMENT IS POWERED BY YOU Todd Park  
2/5/2010 GETTING STARTED Todd Park  

 

Linked Data Publication in a Data Browser

The above tables have been copied to a spreadsheet and formatted as linked data tables. The linked data tables are in both relational and graph formats to capture the relationships and visualize them. There is considerable data science and art involved in building the knowledge base, spreadsheets, and interactive dashboard.

There are three parts to this activity as follows:

  • A Hack-a-Thon, but with a Scraper Wiki (MindTouch) to produce a detailed Wiki Table of Contents and multiple Spreadsheet Tables for Spotfire analytics; and
  • A Code-a-Palooza, but without Code using Spotfire so a very large relational database (Health Datapalooza V Medicare Claims) can be used all in memory for Spotfire analytics.
  • A Meetup to mentor and train data scientists and others in creating a series of Data Publications in Data Browsers starting with Health United States 2013 (in process)

The Slides below are screen captures to show the methodology and results.

MORE TO FOLLOW

Slides

Slide 1 HHS IDEA LAB

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/

HHSIDEALABWebPageSlide1.png

Slide 2 Data Science for the HHS IDEA LAB Knowledge Base

http://semanticommunity.info/Data_Science/Data_Science_for_the_HHS_IDEA_LAB

HHSIDEALABMindTouchSlide2.png

Slide 8 Spotfire Cover Page

Web Player

HHSIDEALABSpotfireSlide8.png

Slide 9 Spotfire Data Ecosystem

Web Player

HHSIDEALABSpotfireSlide9.png

Slide 10 Health, United States, 2013 (in process)

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm

huscover2013.jpg

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Research Notes

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-data/

https://healthdata.gov/blog/tom-frieden-data-wonk

https://healthdata.gov/blog/announci...ed-states-2013

 

huscover2013.jpg

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm (PDF)

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents...tm#trendtables

In the spreadsheet version data users can perform custom analyses, create graphs, and export results to presentation software. In addition, chartbook figures are linked to PowerPoint charts.

Customize large spreadsheets by: 
Hiding unnecessary rows and columns: Format/Column (or row)/Hide or unhide 
Set print area: File/Print area/Set (use cursor to highlight area)
File/page setup
File/Print preview

http://healthdatapalooza.org/sunday-workshops/#Wk4

4. Tutorial – Enterprise and Scientific Data Interoperability using Linked Data

My Note: I oould add the previous data science work I have done that matches the Projects like NLM APIs

Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases Fellowship

HHS Chief Technology Officer seeks a 1 year, full time IT fellow who can help plan and organize a scheme to interlink all governmental computers for public access.  See the description and links below.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has recently posted an opening for a 12-month fellowship. The goal of this project is to create a solution to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) current problem of multiple, disparate data sources that simultaneously meets the requirements of two new White House memoranda (Increasing Access to Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research and Open Data Policy – Managing Information as an Asset).  In collaboration with leads from the Office of Chief Information Officer and the Office of the Chief Technology Officer, the candidate selected for this fellowship will work with the relevant research agencies (e.g. the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) to create a business plan mapping out the way in which HHS can effectively develop data linkages across the  organization.

My Note: The first statement: "help plan and organize a scheme to interlink all governmental computers for public access" and the second statement: "create a solution to HHS's current problem of multiple, disparate data sources" that need "data linkages across the organization" seem to be inconsistent.

Established in 2012, HHS Entrepreneurs was the model for the Presidential Innovation Fellows Program. HHS has worked to attract entrepreneurial talent to create a culture that supports intelligent risk-taking and accelerates innovation. This pathway partners federal staff working on high-risk, high-reward projects with external entrepreneurs for a 12-month fellowship.

About the project:  https://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/innovative-design-development-and-linkages-of-databases/

My Note: See my response below.

1. Why do you want to be an external entrepreneur at the Department of Health and Human Services and why do you want to work on the project you selected? *

Note: I tried to select: Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases, but it was not available

Because I have participated in all the Health DataPalooza's with innovative applications and Todd Park praised my work publicly in his HDP session with Damon Davis last year. I find them to be inspirational leaders.

Because George Thomas was a wonderful friend and colleague over many years and it was a great pleasure for me to give him a Special Recognition for Excellence in my Federal CIO Council role and I would like to see his work on Semantic Linkages of HHS Databases continue.

Because I know that I can do wonderful things with HHS data by creating data stories and products in a data science knowledge repository that would be world-class!

2. What unique skill sets and/or expertise can you bring to advance the project's objectives? How do you plan to teach these skills to the internal project teams? *

Ph.D. Data Scientist / Data Journalist with 30+ years of federal service (US EPA Senior Enterprise Architect and Data Scientist), a number very successful Federal CIO Council Leadership Roles (e.g. Semantic Interoperability Community of Practice), and now successful private practice with community service in leading the Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup with a number of health data analyses and a Heathcare.gov application using Data Science and Be Informed. I provided regular tutorials on Practical Data Science for Data Scientists (a George Mason University graduate class I was asked to  prepare) at the Meetups. I know how to build data ecosystems of HHS data sets for semantic linking and advanced visualizations in Spotfire. See for example the HealthIT.gov Dashboard

3. In previous roles, how have you encouraged creativity, risk-taking and problem solving? Please provide a specific example, and explain how you have encouraged colleagues to take risks and implement creative solutions for challenging problems, tasks and issues. *

I built and sustained multiple communities of practice for the Federal CIO Council (2003-2009) that were recognized for creativity, risk-taking and problem solving and with a Special Award of Appreciation from the Council.

I built and sustained Semantic Community for the Federal Government (2009-2010) and now privately (2010-present) which received over 2M hits last year and receives praise like: Semantic Community participates in these activities and events to build semantic data science and semantic interoperability applications. “Just wanted to say how helpful it is that you take notes and share so broadly at these types of events.  Thanks for your ongoing contributions to all the communities of which you are a part.” (Senior US Federal Government Official)

Thanks again for the opportunity to speak to your group on Tuesday. We always appreciate the work you do organizing these communities, and we’re happy to help you out as well whenever we can. (Senior Industry Official)

I have now started and sustained the Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup for the past 6 months with considerable growth in membership (200+) and enthusiasm: http://www.meetup.com/Federal-Big-Data-Working-Group/

HDC Webinar: The HHS HDI Strategy & Execution Plan

Source: https://events-na5.adobeconnect.com/...t_landing.html

Monday, February 10, 2014 1:00:00 PM EST - 2:00:00 PM EST

Since the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) launched its efforts to make the vast array of data resources it curates openly available for public consumption in 2010 the available in HealthData.gov catalog has grown exponentially. HHS’s efforts to release data for the purpose of sparking innovations in healthcare and the delivery of human services is known as the Health Data Initiative (HDI).  The mission of the HDI is to help improve health, healthcare, and the delivery of human services by harnessing the power of data and fostering a culture of innovative uses of data in public and private sector institutions, communities, research groups and policy making arenas.  The HDI’s goal is to make health data openly available, disseminate the data broadly across the health and human services ecosystem, and continuously educate internal and external participants in the ecosystem about the value of the data.  In November 2013 the Department announced its first ever HDI Strategy and Execution Plan to achieve the following  goals five goals:

- Advancing the HealthData.gov site to a more efficient, user friendly, technically advanced platform for data discovery.
- Highlighting departmental assets that support achieving HHS strategic initiatives and an increased focus on strategic data liberation.
- Educating new and existing, internal and external participants in the health and human services ecosystem about data availability for innovative applications, and disseminating the data for problem solving.
- Enabling and incentivizing the health data ecosystem to utilize all data assets in innovative ways.
- Implementing administration and departmental policies that foster openness and transparency.

This session will cover an overview of each goal, invite discussion about data resources the public would like to have access to, and encourage sharing about the novel uses of the data for innovations across American health and social services.

Speaker
Damon Davis

Damon Davis serves as Director for the Health Data Initiative in the office of the Chief Technology Officer in the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. He is responsible for leading the Department’s efforts to promote the Health Data Initiative, a movement devoted to implementing policies directed at improving access to federal data resources, and promoting the expanded uses of the data for applications and services to promote innovative solutions to problems in health, health care, and the delivery of human services.

Prior to his post in the CTO’s office Mr. Davis worked in the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) in the Office of Consumer eHealth (OCeH). As Special Assistant in ONC his focus was on increasing consumer access to secure electron

The New HHS Health Data Strategy and Execution Plan

Source: http://www.healthdataconsortium.org/...execution-plan

Posted on November 5, 2013

In keeping with the White House’s Open Government Initiative, we’ve got news from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on a new effort to open up more health data. Damon Davis, Director of the Health Data Initiative at HHS, announced last week the release of a Strategy and Execution Plan for improving HDI’s efforts in releasing health data to improve health and health care and spark innovation in the delivery of health care. Below is his summary of the Plan and how you can get involved, including by commenting on the blog post on healthdata.gov.

Recently the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released its strategy and execution plan for improving existing efforts to release health, health care, and human services related data for the purpose of sparking innovation.  HHS’s open data work, known as the Health Data Initiative (HDI), has a mission to help improve each of those focal areas by harnessing the power of data and fostering a culture for data’s innovative uses in public and private sector institutions, communities, research groups and policy making arenas.  This HDI Strategy and Execution Plan articulates our goal to make health data openly available, disseminate the data broadly across the health and human services ecosystem, and continuously educate internal and external participants in the ecosystem about the value of the data.

A focused discussion about the next steps for the HDI helped us quickly realize that a strategic plan, with tactics for executing toward specific goals and measurable outcomes, would be a tremendous asset for providing direction and focus for the HDI’s many contributors.  Taking input from a diverse set of contributors like the Health Data Consortium, the National Center for Vital & Health Statistics Workgroup on Data Access and Use, and the department’s many Health Data Leads we developed this living document intended to guide the direction of the work without limiting its options or potential.

The HDI strategy and execution plan has five core components with a sixth strategic goal focused on measuring our collective work’s progress toward each goal and resultant impacts.  Below is a brief recap of those strategic goals.  You can read and provide your comments about the strategic execution plan on the HealthData.gov blog.

HDI Strategic Goals

Advancing the HealthData.gov site to a more efficient, user friendly, technically advanced platform for data discovery.  The goal for the platform is to be a highly useful, reliable, and well-supported platform for sharing datasets and fostering innovation.  Success of the platform depends on broad-based enthusiasm for and commitment to the HDI, achieved through expanding partnerships, both internally and externally.  Data is our primary asset and it is a strategic imperative to help our partners get all of the appropriate Strategically Relevant Data Assets (SRDA) published on the platform as quickly as possible  as they are strategically relevant data assets for Departmental goals.

Highlighting departmental assets that support achieving HHS strategic initiatives and an increased focus on strategic data liberation.  As the HDI attracts new and diverse audiences to the platform as a discovery zone of data resources it will be beneficial to focus on a subset of these data for directed communications efforts and promotion.  These SRDA will need to be characterized and defined, then publicized broadly through strategic communications to entice creative uses for these and other data on the platform.

Educating new and existing, internal and external participants in the health and human services ecosystem about data availability for innovative applications, and disseminating the data for problem solving.  Stakeholders from both inside and external to HHS are valuable contributors to the HDI.  Internally, our HHS colleagues are the data liberators, however, it is important to engender understanding of the importance of openly available, easily accessible data for creative uses both for external innovations and internal operations.  That understanding needs to penetrate beyond the Health Data Leads to program staff across the organization. Similarly external stakeholders need a broader and deeper understanding of why data assets were collected, the ways those assets are available to them, and how to interact with the data.  Therefore a concerted effort to educate stakeholders about data availability, intended and possible uses, and examples of how data has been used by others are valuable educational components that will propel expanded appreciation for and uses of the data.

Enabling and incentivizing the health data ecosystem to utilize all data assets in innovative ways.  The availability and analysis of data is one of the biggest drivers in the transformation of healthcare and there are tremendous opportunities for innovation in the health and humans services ecosystems that will be fed by the vast stores of data made available via the HDI.  An ongoing goal is to unleash the power of private-sector innovators and entrepreneurs to utilize HHS data in the creation of applications, products, and services that positively impact health and health care in the emergence of a decentralized, self-propelled “ecosystem” of innovators across America.  That ecosystem includes organizations upon which the HDI will rely on for feedback, intelligence and insights that facilitate the democratization of health data and/or advocate for the innovative and responsible use of health data.  The Health Data Consortium (HDC) is one such entity working to foster the availability and use of health data to drive innovations while advocating across players in the healthcare continuum for data liberation and appropriate uses of data.

Implementing administration and departmental policies that foster openness and transparency.  There are several administration policies that support and impact the activities of the HDI and the internal stakeholders who produce and provide access to departmental data assets.  Coordinating the current policy implementation agenda requires the department to understand the implications of each policy separately in order to harmonize the implementation of all policies for minimal disruption and maximum impact.  A key resource for implementing administration open data policies will be Project Open Data on Github.

Ultimately, many of us involved in the delivery of human services, health care, or the development of policies that affect those areas would like to understand more about the data’s impact downstream: What the impacts of broad availability of open data are on things like population health, policy development, and access to care. The question is “What are the outcomes and impacts of the HDI and related activities on health care and the delivery of human services?”  Getting to those answers will require contributions from across the health ecosystem.  But it’s a concerted effort worth validating.

To read more about the execution steps and planned measures, visit the blog post on healthdata.gov.

HHS IDEA LAB

About: The HHS IDEA Lab equips and empowers HHS employees and members of the public who have an idea and want to act.

The People: The foundational effort of the IDEA Lab is to disrupt the barriers between organizational siloes and practices that prevent people from working together.

We do this by equipping HHS Employees and members of the public with new methodologies, aircover and pathways for innovation.

We believe that people taking action on an idea is essential to the modernization of government.

The Projects: The IDEA Lab has engaged hundreds of people by helping them act, formulate a project and produce results.

The Pathways: The IDEA Lab has six pathways for bringing people together based on their ideas, skills, and interests.

The IDEA Lab not only helps people act on their ideas, but takes action on it's own. These are projects that are identified and sponsored by the IDEA Lab.

The Blog: The IDEA Lab is itself an ever-evolving experiment. Stay up-to-date on the IDEA Lab's activities and learn about all the innovation activities at HHS with the IDEA Lab blog.

About the Lab

The ultimate goal of the IDEA Lab is a more modern and effective government.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sebelius established the HHS IDEA Lab to improve how the Department delivers on its mission. This effort was started as a response to input from the workforce and public to promote advances in organizational management centered around three core beliefs:

  • Every individual has the ability to improve the health and well-being of Americans;
  • People are more powerful when working together; and
  • There is a solution to every problem.

Government agencies may be prime examples of administrative structures that have calcified over time and become resistant to change. Yet, change is both necessary and imminent, as new technology, communication methods, and generational interest conflict with current ”tiered” organizational structures and government agencies learn how to manage the “flattened” organizational models that are succeeding elsewhere. Further, the challenges that HHS faces in serving its mission in the 21st century are evolving and increasingly complex, requiring the organization to adapt and change its approach to finding solutions.

The IDEA Lab exists as the bridge between the old world and a vision of a new, networked world, where value is found in an individual’s talents, as opposed to their position in a hierarchical structure. The foundational effort of the IDEA Lab is to overcome barriers to communication and collaboration between organizational siloes and practices that prevent people from working together. The approach the IDEA Lab takes is based on four tenets:

Innovation is a direct result of the freedom to experiment.

Design is critical to effectively communicate ideas.

Entrepreneurship allows us to take advantage of underutilized talent.

Action, above all else, is encouraged.

Finally, the IDEA Lab itself is an ever-evolving experiment.  We will be constantly adjusting our existing platforms, pathways, methodologies and tools to meet the needs of the Department and the innovators with HHS’s organization and in broad communities beyond it.  Check out the IDEA Lab Calendar to see what we are up to, and reach out to us on the IDEA Lab BlogTwitter, or Facebook Page at any time and be sure to check out the great people involved with the IDEA Lab and the projects they are working on!

The People

The HHS IDEA Lab believes in people. We give them the tools they need to act on their ideas. Below are people who have taken their idea, acted on it, and produced results. See how each person is experimenting by clicking the beaker icon under their name.

People: HHS Entrepreneurs

Chris Lunt, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
Chris Lunt
Frank Sanborn, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
Frank Sanborn
Kevin Larsen, Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT
Kevin Larsen
Amy Sherwood, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
Amy Sherwood
Mindy Hangsleben, ONC for Health IT
Mindy Hangsleben
Zachery Jiwa, Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services
Zachery Jiwa
David Cartier, Health Resources and Services Administration
David Cartier
 

People: HHS Innovates

Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living
Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez
Claro Yu, National Institutes of Health
Claro Yu
Debra J. Grabowski, Indian Health Service
Debra J. Grabowski
Eric S. Weiss, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Eric S. Weiss
Gwen Shinko, National Institutes of Health
Gwen Shinko
Ivor D’Souza, National Institutes of Health
Ivor D'Souza
James Onken, National Institutes of Health
James Onken
Joyce E. B. Backus, National Institutes of Health
Joyce E. B. Backus
Juliette S. Kendrick, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Juliette S. Kendrick
Kathy Slawson, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Kathy Slawson
Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service
Kelly Stephenson
Lynn Sokler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Lynn Sokler
Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health
Matthew McAuliffe
Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration
Steven Musser
Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health
Rachel Ballard Barbash
Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration
Rebecca Spitzgo
Richard Schieber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Richard Schieber
Stacey Mattison, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Stacy Mattison
Manuel B. Datiles III, National Institutes of Health
Manuel Datiles

People: Presidential Innovation Fellows

Sean Herron, Food and Drug Administration

Sean Herron

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/openfda/

People: Sammies

Julie Segre, National Institutes of Health
Julie Segre
Nora D. Volkow, National Institutes of Health
Nora D. Volkow
Tara Palmore, National Institutes of Health
Tara Palmore
Hamid Jafari, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Hamid Jafari
Michael Gottesman, National Institutes of Health
Michael Gottesman
J. Todd Weber, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
J Todd. Weber

The Projects

The HHS IDEA Lab believes in experimentation. Below are past and current projects that are tackling some of the toughest problems in health care and government. Each project is associated with one of our Pathways.

Accelerating Clinical Quality Measures for the Affordable Care Act

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/ My Note: Goes to Apllication Form
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...able-care-act/

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology in partnership with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services are testing & accelerating the development of clinical quality measures, with the adoption of Lean methodologies, to monitor the impact of the implementation of the HITECH Act & the Affordable Care Act.

The delivery and payment reform provisions of the Affordable Care Act are transitioning the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to value based reimbursement in an effort to achieve the three-part aim of better care and health while reducing costs through improvement.  Clinical quality measures help the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) understand the impact of its programs and policies and to plan target areas of future focus. HHS is investing electronic health record (EHR) deployment and use in the U.S. With this transition, there is considerable interest and promise in transitioning the clinical quality measures from predominantly pre-EHR measures to leverage the enhanced information found in EHRs.  Clinical quality measures are created in a production system- a series of experts following predictable steps with hand offs and dependencies. Currently the creation of a clinical quality measure from identification of a high priority health topic to deployment is a 3 to 5 year process.

One of the most successful tools from manufacturing industries to achieve improved efficiencies is the Lean Production System. Lean has also become a key tool for quality improvement in health care delivery. Lean is way of analyzing and organizing complex processes with many steps and people involved in a process- especially a production process.  Mindy Hangsleben and Amy Sherwood, External Entrepreneurs are leading a value stream analysis of the clinical quality e-measure production and is guiding the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and CMS through the work of improving efficiency of the production of quality measures.  They have also held a number of Lean focused workshops to train internal staff on lean methodologies, making experts out of a handful of ONC and CMS employees, including Internal Entrepreneur Kevin Larsen.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS

Mindy Hangsleben
Amy Sherwood

Anti-Cancer Research

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/sammies/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ncer-research/

Michael Gottesman of the National Institutes of Health was a finalist in the category of Career Achievement Medal for having led seminal studies in the treatment of drug-resistant cancer cells and played an instrumental role in improving the rigor of medical research throughout a four-decade career.

Dr. Michael M. Gottesman has spent nearly four decades as a highly respected scientist at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), conducting important studies on how cancer cells resist destruction by several widely used chemotherapy drugs.

As chief of the laboratory of cell biology at the National Cancer Institute, Gottesman is the country’s premier researcher on the interaction of cancer and medications. He has developed molecular tools to define the drug-resistance genes found in individual cancers, information that is used to predict a patient’s response to therapy.

Gottesman’s scientific breakthroughs have opened the door to designing medicines to be more effective in prolonging and saving lives, something now being tackled by pharmaceutical companies.

“His body of work identified the intricate processes by which cancer cells resist a variety of anti-cancer drugs, demonstrating a need for new approaches for the development of better drugs,” said Dr. Harold Varmus, the director of the National Cancer Institute.

Gottesman said it had been a mystery as to why cancer cells become simultaneously resistant to multiple anti-cancer drugs.

“We found that cancer cells were using a mechanism that nature had already devised to protect the body and were using it to protect themselves,” said Gottesman. “We opened a whole new area for pharmacologists around the handling of anti-cancer drugs.”

In addition to this significant research, Gottesman for the past 19 years has had a dual role as deputy director of the NIH Intramural Research Program, the world’s largest biomedical research operation. This multi-faceted program includes 1,200 principal investigators and more than 4,000 postdoctoral fellows who conduct basic, translational and clinical research at 23 NIH centers.

“Michael has a rare combination of scientific insight, administrative acumen, unselfishness, patience and boundless optimism that have allowed him to blend science and administration in a manner that has increased scientific and organizational innovativeness and accomplishment,” said Varmus.

In his administrative role, Gottesman said he is a like a senior dean at a university overseeing and coordinating all of NIH’s internal research, recruiting highly-skilled scientists and training the next generation of biomedical and behavioral investigators.

During Gottesman’s tenure, NIH research has been responsible for numerous scientific accomplishments, including the HPV vaccine, new treatment and insights into multiple sclerosis, more effective imaging for early detection of heart disease, basic research that will lead to development of a universal vaccine for influenza, and the creation of the Undiagnosed Diseases Program. During this period, Nobel Prizes have been awarded to seven scientists who trained or worked at NIH.

“By his leadership and thoughtful, gentle hand on the tiller, Michael has established high standards that all employees try to achieve in terms of scientific excellence and in dedicating their lives to finding answers to medical problems,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of NIH. “The scientists look up to Michael because he defines the culture of the NIH.”

Gottesman also has developed and championed programs to encourage women and minorities to pursue science and come to NIH. Under his leadership, Asian scientists in tenure track positions increased from 10 to 30 percent, while the number of women in the clinical investigator tenure track rose from 28 to 38 percent.

With NIH’s emphasis on high-risk, high-reward research, Gottesman’s administrative role includes managing a rigorous scientific review of each research project every four years, which he said amounts to roughly one review a day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Gottesman’s job is to “make sure there is consistency of quality” in all of the research done at NIH. “He sets the standards,” said Fauci.

“It is an opportunity to make a real difference in the way fellow scientists are conducting research,” said Gottesman.

Varmus credits Gottesman with increasing the stringency of the scientific reviews, resulting in the reduction or closure of under-performing projects, and allowing the reallocation of increasingly scarce resources to high-priority projects.

“This process, although painful at times, increases scientific returns for taxpayer-derived funding and enables more aggressive approaches to scientific discovery and subsequent benefits for patients,” said Varmus.

Gottesman also has created special programs that annually train 6,000 individuals, ranging from high school and college students to post-baccalaureate and post-doctorate fellows. Many of his programs are recognized as a primary source for increasing the diversity of students entering biomedical research at NIH and throughout the country.

“I am most proud of maintaining an environment that is conducive to high-quality science that is sustained over many years,” said Gottesman. “NIH is a crown jewel in the government, and we want to make sure the jewels are shining brightly.”

Below are is an interview with Tom Fox, from the Partnership for Public Service and Michael M. Gottesman on his innovative work over the years.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO

Content is from the Sammies website and more information can be found here.

Application of Design Thinking to Grants

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ing-to-grants/

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is working to improve both grantee program implementation and workplace collaboration. This will enable ACF to better meet the needs of the low income populations they serve through the creation of low cost, replicable organizational strategies.

The Administration for Children and Families’ Office of Family Assistance provides $235 million in discretionary grants annually to improve the lives of low-income families by promoting economic self-sufficiency, responsible fatherhood, healthy marriages and family strengthening. Several issues arise with monitoring awarded grants:

  1. Service delivery does not always align with the day-to-day realities and challenges faced by low-income individuals and families, interfering with clients’ abilities to access and benefit from the programs grantees provide;
  2. Grantees may not have the staff, time, or expertise to conduct analyses and/or develop solutions to address these barriers;
  3. Due to the private nature of communication channels like email and telephone, lessons-learned are not easily shared with other grantees or grant managers;
  4. Since grantees and grant managers are geographically distributed, they rarely get to meet face-to-face.  This can hinder their chance to build relationships with and count on one another for workplace support.

To address these issues, ACF seeks to apply approaches such as design thinking strategies and collaboration best practices to create low-cost, replicable approaches to assess client problems, modernize interactions with grantees, facilitate better knowledge sharing, and build a stronger support network for grantees.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR

Jared Goralnick
Amy Ng

WATCH RELATED VIDEO

 

Automate Blue Button Initiative

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...-in-residence/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...on-initiative/

The Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) launched the Standards and Interoperability Framework for the Blue Button Initiative to develop standards that allow patients to privately and securely download their health information in a common, machine-readable format, as well as automate the exchange of that data from their health care providers to other third party apps and services.

The S&I Framework is a collaborative community of participants from the public and private sectors who are focused on providing the tools, services and guidance to facilitate the functional exchange of health information. The S&I Framework uses a set of integrated functions, processes, and tools that enable execution of specific value-creating initiatives. Each S&I Initiative tackles a critical interoperability challenge through a rigorous process that typically includes:

- Development of clinically-oriented user stories and robust use cases
- Harmonization of interoperability specifications and implementation guidance
- Provision of real-world experience and implementer support through new initiatives, workgroups and pilot projects
- Mechanisms for feedback and testing of implementations, often in conjunction with ONC partners such as NIST

More information on the S&I Framework can be found here.

Blue Button Project

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/president...ation-fellows/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...utton-project/

Blue Button aims to empower all people in America with access to their health records in a secure, electronic format.

Originally a round one project for the Presidential Innovation Fellows, round two fellows are focusing on  growing the Blue Button Initiative across the public and private sectors – patients can download their own health information from a growing array of organizations (the Department of Veterans Affairs’ health system, private-sector health care providers, etc.) and securely share their medical histories with caregivers, import their prescription histories into mobile reminder apps, and more.  Fellows are creating and testing different senarios where personal health data will be used.

Blue Button was launched in 2010 by the Department of Veterans Affairs, with White House support, to give veterans the ability to access and download their medical records from an online patient portal. Since then, Blue Button adoption has expanded to other federal agencies, including the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the private sector.  Today, we estimate that more than 100 million Americans have increasing amounts and types of electronic access to their personal health information from a variety of sources, including healthcare providers, healthcare insurance companies, labs, state health information networks, and others.

Presidential Innovation Fellows

Adam Dole

Nayan Jain

More information on the Blue Button Initiative

http://www.healthit.gov/bluebutton

http://bluebuttonplus.org/.

Bridging the CHASM of Health Disparities

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...h-disparities/

The United States Public Health Service’s (USPHS) Community Health and Service Missions (CHASM) bridges the chasm of health disparities by providing essential human services for those who are least able to help themselves. CHASM improves emergency response capacity by fostering collaborations among local, state, tribal, and nongovernmental organizations.

The United States Public Health Service’s (USPHS) Community Health and Service Missions (CHASM) bridges the chasm of health disparities by providing essential human services for those who are least able to help themselves. CHASM improves emergency response capacity by fostering collaborations among local, state, tribal, and nongovernmental organizations.

CHASM is an innovative avenue for efficiently utilizing the U.S. Public Health Services Commissioned Corps (USPHS), a highly mobile cadre of multi-disciplinary subject matter experts from across federal agencies, to partner with local communities. USPHS response teams are deployed to underserved areas where officers provide expertise and participate in subject matter exchange in environmental health, epidemiology, toxicology, program administration and development, dental, veterinary, nursing, primary care, mental health, preventive medicine, and applied public health care.

Since the establishment of CHASM in 2010, $2.85 million worth of health-related services have been provided. For every dollar invested in a project, at least two dollars of services are rendered. This makes the return on investment significant particularly when communities and government are under tight budgetary constraints.  Even more valuable, is the lasting impact the missions have on the community through newly acquired skills. CHASM fosters local participation and community ownership leading to long term public health improvements.

Bringing Clarity to Health Information: CDC Vital Signs

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...c-vital-signs/

Americans want trustworthy health information they can use, but are often bombarded with largely unusable or incorrect information. To help remedy this, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs was developed to translate the latest scientific and surveillance data into recommended actions using plain language that is easy to understand.

Americans want trustworthy health information they can use, but are often bombarded with largely unusable or incorrect information. To help remedy this, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vital Signs was developed to translate the latest scientific and surveillance data into recommended actions using plain language that is easy to understand. Specific recommendations are directed to individuals and key institutions, including state and local health officials, employers, hospital administrators and school officials.

CDC Vital Signs releases separate material to two audiences. Information for scientists is written in language used in technical journals, while information for the public is written in clear easy-to-understand language. Town Hall teleconferences are also held monthly so that nearly 200 state and local health departments, clinicians, and others can share their own experiences in their community.

In the first year (ending June 2011), monthly topics covered cancer prevention, obesity, tobacco, binge drinking, access to healthcare, HIV/AIDS testing, motor vehicle passenger safety, preventing cardiovascular disease, healthcare-associated infections, teen pregnancy, asthma, and food safety. Podcasts and fact sheets are available for all of these topics.  The initiative demonstrates the effectiveness of different techniques for using and presenting sound data in the service of disease prevention.

RELATED WEBSITE

CDC VitalSigns

Building Health Resilience Technology to Withstand Natural Disasters

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ral-disasters/

The Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response of HHS and the Federal Emergency Management Agency are developing innovative solutions that will allow individuals with access and functional needs to continue to use their durable medical equipment (DME) during prolonged power outages.

The  Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) are working to enhance community and individual resilience—part of the core missions of the two organizations—and have a profound impact on future disaster responses, by helping to identify potential solutions that will allow individuals with access and functional needs to continue to use their durable medical equipment (DME – includes medical devices powered by electricity, such as oxygen concentrators, ventilators, and intravenous infusion pumps) at home during prolonged power outages, thereby decompressing the burden on the health care system.

External Entrepreneur Frank Sanborn has developed a solution by using the Raspberry Pi to develop a device that has the ability to connect to the Philips Portable Oxygen Concentrator, which allows for signals to be sent from durable medical equipment to a local server allowing medical professionals and emergency response workers to have accurate information as to the status of a patient. As part of the next step of development, Frank and Internal Entrepreneurs Nicole Lurie, Pill Ferro, Patrick Heart, and Ted Okada are running a series of code-a-thons and challenges to assist with the software coding.  More information on the code-a-thons and updates on the project can be found on the IDEA Lab blog.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS

Frank Sanborn

CDCOLOGY: A Microtasking Project

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/cdc-ology/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention built and piloted a web-based crowdsourcing platform that cultivates student engagement with CDC. Students become “CDCOLOGISTs” and learn about the importance of public health through the completion of short challenges posted by CDC staff. The platform, the first of it’s kind in HHS, became known as CDCOLOGY. By allowing fresh, creative solutions to influence CDC’s programs and providing personalized educational feedback, CDCOLOGY provides for a unique student-staff interaction.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


CDCOLOGY™: Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

The Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health estimates that 250,000 more public health workers will be needed by 2020. A study published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research indicated that participatory health initiatives are becoming a part of the public health ecosystem.

CDCOLOGY is a mechanism for CDCOLOGY Faculty (employees) to post unclassified, two-minute to seven-hour long microtask challenges that can be solved by university students. Tasks span multiple fields and skill sets, including: preparedness, lab sciences, graphic design, policy, research, and data analysis. There is no burdensome application process or eligibility requirements as all students with .edu email addresses are welcome to participate.

The pilot was launched on December 4, 2012. Just six days after launch, the site had drawn 268 participants with another 443 awaiting the second round of invitations to register. As of February 01, 2014, the site had drawn 1,344 participants with at least 75 of those participants being CDC staff engaged in the project.

CDC benefited from the CDCOLOGY™ pilot by encouraging employees to rethink project management, reduce administrative burden, and provide collaboration for public health solutions.

Universities benefit during the pilot though engagement with CDC and by offering their students an out-of-classroom opportunity that has real social impact. During the Ignite pilot, thousands of students for the first time were able to engage the scientists and analysts at CDC virtually, completing small tasks which produce meaningful work for national and international public health. Faculty and staff have indicated possible incorporation of CDCOLOGY™ into syllabi as a course component or extra credit assignment.

Initial findings of the pilot, having accessed over 75 CDC staff and over 1300 university students, has  suggest increase in the number of interdisciplinary undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate students interested in public health professions.

This Ignite team received positive feedback from programs about both student and faculty interest, and the team is looking forward to exploring other potential uses for the pilot both within and outside the classroom. One specific future enhancement and use of the website within CDC could be to capture real-time information during disasters to drive behavior changes. For example, why not ask students in affected areas to provide a list of local college rumors about why students are reluctant to get novel H1N1 vaccine for free? The results of challenges like these and others can help to inform our program strategies and tactics attempting to drive the behavior changes for which CDC aspires. This same concept can be applied to CDC’s ability to provide technical assistance to its state and local grantees, all through the agency’s ability to access the public and in many cases, the end users for our programs.

TEAM MEMBERS

Diana Yassanye (Project Lead), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Chelsea Cipriano, Department of Health and Human Services
James Rajotte, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Jacinta Smith, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Serena Vinter, Public Health Analyst, Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Additional Information

CDCOLOGY™ Platform: http://cdcology.sparked.com/

CDCOLOGY™ Wiki site: http://code.phiresearchlab.org/confluence/display/MIC/CDC+Ology

CDCOLOGY™ ASPPH Webinars: http://www.aspph.org/meetingsevents/webinars.cfm

Cloud-Based GIS Maps Displaying Aggregate Data on Medical Malpractice

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...l-malpractice/

The Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) is building a Geographic Information System (GIS) application and dashboard to display data on medical malpractice and adverse actions taken against health care practitioners. The new data visualization tools will present summarized data in new and interactive ways to make this resource more accessible to a wider audience.

HRSA operates the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), a web-based system that implements important patient safety and anti-fraud legislation.  The NPDB system maintains over 1.1 million reports of health care practitioners, providers, and suppliers with a history of malpractice, incompetence, fraud, license suspension, criminal conviction, or unprofessional conduct. Individual data reports against practitioners, providers and suppliers are kept confidential by law.

While aggregate data are currently available to researchers and other interested parties, these data are not easily digestible for non-technical users. Therefore, the goal of this project is to make NPDB trend data more accessible, open, and transparent to researchers and the general public. Additionally, the External Entrepreneur is  partnering with the internal team to enhance the current data and  recommend opportunities  for process streamlining.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR

Krishna Malyala

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


CMS Coordinated Press Response Strategy

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...dinated-press/

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) prototyped an internal tool for organizing cleared statements and other information in order to provide more effective communications to the public through improved response time to reporters.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


CMS Coordinated Press Response Strategy:
Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

The press response strategy within HHS is often individually responsive and does not follow a coordinated and streamlined process; rather, statements are approved for individual reporters ad hoc and lost shortly after response to the reporter. This process relies on individual staff members to maintain personal databases of previously cleared statements and knowledge of reporters past interest in subject matter.  It relies heavily on maintenance of email archives and does not capture the work of the staff.  When there is a change in staffing, this knowledge is often lost.

This project used several models of pilot testing.  First, the team tested a variety of platforms to store and track press statements.  They tested each site for functionality, familiarity, and ease of use.  Once a prototype was settled the team released the platform in waves in order to watch and correct for usage and errors in design. The team also explored models of encouraging staff to utilize the platform through incentives, rewards, and directives.

While simply building an application for storing and retrieving reporter inquiries is relatively straight forward, designing it into the workflow of a fast-paced office environment is challenging. Therefore, this team is using lean methodologies and light-weight technologies to iterate towards a small but viable tool that can get buy-in from their office staff before scaling.

To monitor whether their effort has a positive impact on their stated objective, the team has identified the following key performance indicators:

  • Time (hours) spent between report inquiry and official response to the inquiry
  • Attitudes of the press officers (via survey)

The team saw a 52% decrease in the response time for reporter inquiries and a generally positive view from staff of the design. In order to continue the testing and implementation, CMS would like to see increased utilization throughout the department achieved through greater exploration of this workflow model with communications specialists across HHS that are working directly with media.

TEAM MEMBERS

Emma Sandoe (Project Lead), Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Keya Joy-Bush, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Rachel Maisler, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Tony Salters, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Brian Cook, Director, Media Relations Group, Office of Communications, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Additional Information

CMS Newsroom

Connecting Kids with Dental Care

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...h-dental-care/

Finding dental care for children is important but was difficult at times until the Health Resources & Services Administration, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the States’ Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) created a web-based locator tool to match kids enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP with oral health providers who will treat them.

In 2007, 12-year-old Deamonte Driver died from complications of an abscessed tooth.  His mother could not find a dentist who accepted Medicaid.  This tragedy spurred Congress to include language in the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009, which required easily accessible contact information for the Medicaid and CHIP participating dental providers in every State on the Insure Kids Now! (IKN) website.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), which administers the Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) programs, partnered with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), which focuses on improving access to care and runs the IKN hotline.  Together, with at least 150 State Medicaid and CHIP agencies and their managed care organizations, they collected the dental provider data and developed Find Dental Providers.

HRSA and CMS devised an easy-to-use electronic submission capability and automated validation tool to improve data quality and reduce administrative burden on States. This “bridge” brings the dental information from the State’s platform to the IKN platform and updates the data hourly.  Geospatial and analytical processes transform the provider data for use in a locator tool so that, for the first time, a parent or guardian can search for an oral care provider by name, benefit plan, zip code, map location and driving instructions via a simple click.

TEAM MEMBERS

Terri Lynn Cohen, Health Resources and Services Administration
Nancy Goetschius, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
James Resnick, Health Resources and Services Administration
Sanjoy Chakraborty, Health Resources and Services Administration
Keith Adams, SAIC
Barbara Gandy, SAIC

Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-alzheimers-2/

Tens of thousands of volunteers are needed—right now—for research to combat Alzheimer’s disease. Through the Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s Initiative, researchers teamed up with a network of community organizations that work with older people and caregivers every day. Together, they found fast, cost-effective ways to identify volunteers, speed up the science, and provide valuable information about services.

Without a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, about 13.2 million older Americans are expected to develop this disease by 2050. Researchers are making strides to understand the disease and test better treatments, but at least 50,000 volunteers (with and without Alzheimer’s) are needed to participate in hundreds of clinical trials.  People with Alzheimer’s disease, their families, and those who serve them rarely know how to participate in clinical trials, so recruiting research participants is costly and time consuming. This innovation bridges this critical gap.

Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s brings together National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Centers (ADCs) that conduct research with the Administration for Community Living’s (ACL) aging services agencies, which  annually reach over 10 million older people and family caregivers. With the National Alzheimer’s Plan as a spark, ACL and NIH collaborated across disciplines and learned about each other’s work. Activities have included free webinars and presentations for both the research and aging services communities. The Initiative has helped inform and connect more individuals to the services provided by ACL and help spur a 25 percent increase in prospective research participants. These efforts continue to inspire collaborations at the state, local, and grassroots levels.

TEAM MEMBERS

Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez, Administration for Community Living
Jennifer Watson, National Institutes of Health
Nina Silverberg, National Institutes of Health
Kate Gordon, RTI International

Creating De-Identified Claims Data

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/crea...d-claims-data/

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) want to develop statistically de-identified Medicare claims data to meet the growing demand for access to Medicare data.

Medicare claims data are collected and assembled by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) as a byproduct of Medicare program administration. These data provide an unparalleled source of information on the costs and quality of health care in the United States. Each year hundreds of researchers, providers, and contractors request and receive sensitive Medicare data as part of their research studies and health care operations activities. However, regulations and policies have limited access to identifiable data (data that connects to the beneficiary’s identity) to protect beneficiary privacy. Data releases for program evaluations, demonstrations, and research projects have been supported, whereas releases for analytic and public reporting purposes have been more limited and use for commercial purposes has been prohibited.

To support the use of Medicare claims data by a variety of users in a manner that protect beneficiary privacy, CMS is interested in adding statistically de-identified Medicare claims data to its product portfolio. Statistically de-identified data would include actual beneficiaries with their associated diagnoses, treatments, outcomes, and costs. This beneficiary experience represents the real world of health care in the Medicare program and although the removal of identifiers and geography may limit some research objectives, de-identified data can still provide a rich resource to support a wide range of desirable health care system analytics. For example, these data could provide information for commercial and nonprofit companies for the evaluation of treatments and drugs, examination of trends in health care cost and service utilization, and development of new analytic methods and tools.

ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION: 

CMS is looking for an entrepreneur with a background in statistics and mathematics. Below are a list of specific skills and qualifications desired:

  • Statistics/Mathematics: data expert with knowledge and experience in data de-identification.
  • Experience with health, health care, and/or insurance data
  • Knowledge of Medicare and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) beneficial but not required.
  • Ability to teach others methodologies for statistical de-identification.
  • Past project management experience, especially in design, implementing and measuring the success of pilots
  • Ability to engage with various stakeholder communities and create meaningful change
HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?

As an entrepreneur you have the chance to make a meaningful difference in lives of millions of Americans. Creating statistically de-identified data is no easy feat, but the outcome of doing so can lead to many opportunities down the road. You will have the chance to network with individuals across government as well as the private sector.

APPLY NOW

If this opportunity sounds like a perfect fit you, apply now or share the opportunity with  someone.  Applications will be open from May 5, 2014 – July 16, 2014.

Creating a Polio-Free World

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/sammies/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...io-free-world/

Hamid Jafari of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was awarded the 2013 National Security and International Affairs Recipient for his work in directing the global initiative that eradicated polio in India and is leading the effort to eliminate this crippling and potentially fatal disease in the final three countries where it persists.

The elusive goal of ridding the world of polio is closer than ever now that the crippling disease has been halted in India, the largest of the four countries in which the virus continued to exist.

Critical to this impressive achievement was Dr. Hamid Jafari, a medical officer from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Jafari managed a public health initiative between the government of India and the World Health Organization (WHO), directed a staff of more than 2,300 people and oversaw the delivery of about 1 billion doses of the polio vaccine to 172 million young children each year between 2008 and 2011. Many of these children were from migrant families or were living in hard-to-reach and high-risk areas.

“India was long thought to be the most difficult country to eradicate polio in the world, but Hamid’s technical and leadership expertise was able to prove the skeptics wrong,” said Dr. Bruce Aylward, WHO’s assistant director general. “He worked with the government to ensure it committed the resources, and he provided an innovative strategy, technical expertise and was a natural diplomat.”

Reports ranged from 559 to 874 cases in India annually between 2006 and 2009, comprising 43 percent of the confirmed cases worldwide. That number reached zero in January 2011 and a year later, India completed a designated 12-month period without a single occurrence. The next month, India was removed from the list of polio-endemic countries.

Polio is a contagious viral illness that mainly affects children and can cause paralysis, difficulty breathing and sometimes death. In the late 1940s to the early 1950s, polio crippled about 35,000 people each year in the United States alone. With the widespread use of vaccines developed in the 1950s, the United States became polio free by 1979.

Dr. Rebecca Martin, director of the Global Immunization Division at CDC, said Jafari, who was on loan to WHO, brought energy and fresh thinking to the National Polio Surveillance Project in India during his five year tenure that ended in March 2012.

“Hamid had innovative solutions such as vaccinations at bus stops and on trains, and he found ways to reach the children of migrant workers. He identified where the populations were and made sure they were vaccinated,” she said.

Martin said the multi-faceted approach included targeting high-risk areas for vaccination campaigns, routine immunization, mobile vaccination teams, research that led to development and use of more effective polio vaccines in a setting of poor sanitation and high rates of diarrhea. She said these strategies are now being used in Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan, the three countries where polio still persists.

Jafari said he looked closely at the problem of children missed by vaccination teams and decided the best way to tackle it was by “weaving a tight net that did not allow children to slip through the program.” To reach the critical population of newborn babies, for example, he had workers routinely register the babies house to house to make sure they were vaccinated.

Jafari said there also was a huge problem in the state of Bihar, a very poor region that was “the last refuge of the virus.” He said large areas of the state flooded every summer from snow melting in the Himalayas. Operations had to be adapted to enable supervision and access. Teams used boats and, motorcycles and waded through water to reach children.

Besides clinics, trains and transit points, Jafari said the program involved visits to more than 60 million houses several times a year and some 2.3 million vaccinators. Surveys confirm that 99 percent of children in the hardest to reach and highest-risk areas are now protected from polio.

“Polio has circulated for millennia in India,” said Anne Schuchat, director of the CDC’s Center for Global Health. “Hamid led the program in India that stopped the spread of poliovirus.”

Content is from the Sammies website and more information can be found  here.

Data-Driven Website Optimization Using Multivariate Testing

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/website-mvt/

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs is testing a new technology and approach to understanding user-behavior for improved communications through enhanced website usability.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


Data-Driven Website Optimization Using MVT:
Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

Digital technologies and best practices evolve rapidly and modern web programs must have the ability to adapt quickly in this changing environment. However, new tools must be systematically and rigorously evaluated to ensure that they are adding value to the larger program. Multivariate testing (MVT) is an established protocol for sites that are designed to optimize sales or where conversations are clear and unambiguous. However the usefulness of MVT on sites that are largely informational in nature is still an open question. Moreover, MVT must be an efficient use of resources and compare favorably with other user experience approaches to justify its incorporation into the overall digital program.

Multivariate testing (MVT) is testing several elements within one webpage to determine which versions of those elements, put together, would best achieve the objective of the webpage.  Adding it into our digital strategies integrates a lean and flexible approach to dealing with what could be only one flaw or error in design (what the website looks like), site architecture (how the webpages are organized), or content curation (how the content is presented).

This project is testing whether incorporating MVT to our digital process leads to efficiencies in how a website is optimized for communications. To calculate the impact of MVT, the team is tracking the following key performance indicators:

Total reach for each page version

  • Change in traffic for final version (Has traffic increased or decreased since the winning version of testing been published?)
  • Findability  of page version (How is the page version likely to perform in search?)
  • Total conversion rate  for each page version (Is the user accomplishing the task?)
  • Total effort hours spent on project by site improvement method
  • Total cost of testing tools
Team Members

Achaia Walton (Project Lead), Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs
Nicholas Garlow, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs
Beth Liu, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs
Karen Silver, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Andrew Wilson, Content Manager, Digital Strategy Group, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs

Designing the Infrastructure for Medicaid & CHIP Eligibility

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...p-eligibility/

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services are developing an electronic infrastructure that States can integrate to implement the Modified Adjusted Gross Income method for determining eligibility for Medicaid & CHIP required under the Affordable Care Act.

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), an estimated 30 million additional Americans will gain access to affordable insurance coverage by 2014. The ACA sets the income eligibility threshold for Medicaid to 133% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) in all States and territories. Currently two-thirds of the non-elderly uninsured are low-income, therefore this standardization of the FPL eliminates the gaps in eligibility for individuals under age 65.  By January 2014, States must convert existing methods for determining eligibility for affordable insurance programs to the Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) approach, which determines income, household composition and family size to comply with ACA.

In partnership with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s State Health Reform Assistance Network, External Entrepreneurs Zac Jiwa and Chris Lunt and Internal Entrepreneurs Julie Boughn, Jessica Kahn, Henry Chao and Elaine Olin from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services,  have developed the “MAGI in the Cloud”, an open source tool that States can use to facilitate Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) eligibility determination.  This is a huge step in providing the necessary infrastructure to States in implementing key requirements of the Affordable Care Act, which sets a new baseline for eligibility. The new “MAGI in the Cloud” platform reduces the risk of States missing the January 2014 deadline and maximizes resources by minimizing duplication of effort among States.  This project also provides an example of how it is possible to go outside of government to partner with another organization to solve a problem and develop a solution outside of government constraints. 

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS

Zac Jiwa
Chris Lunt

Digital Media, Aging, and Disability: What Works & Why?

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...hat-works-why/

The Administration for Community Living (ACL) wants to explore how the aging and disability communities are using technology and new media to learn about and manage services.

ACL brings together the efforts and achievements of the Administration on Aging, the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the HHS Office on Disability to serve as the Federal agency responsible for increasing access to community supports, while focusing attention and resources on the unique needs of older Americans and people with disabilities across the lifespan.

ACL recognizes that digital media has changed the way people communicate. ACL wants to explore how the aging and disability communities, including their families and caregivers, communicate using technology and new media. We believe that there are successful examples of how people use mobile media and social media to inform and enable choices in services beyond which ACL’s current tools, such as the Eldercare Locator, currently support.

ACL will undertake a project to survey the current state of communications in the aging and disabled communities and will develop at least one pilot system to demonstrate the ways in which technology and new media can improve communication and decision making in the aging and disability communities.

ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION

ACL is looking for a strong entrepreneur with a background in technology, specifically the development and implementation of consumer service platforms. Below are a list of specific skills and qualifications desired:

  • Technology background – has experience with developing and implementing consumer service platforms (wikis, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and new media (mobile media, social media, etc.)
  • Ability to develop applications using agile development and technologies such as CSS, HTML5
  • Past project management experience, especially in design, implementing and measuring the success of pilots
  • Ability to engage with various stakeholder communities and create meaningful change
HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?

As an entrepreneur you have the chance to make a meaningful difference in lives of millions of Americans, especially as our population ages and we provide more and better services to persons with disabilities. This is an emerging market and offers the chance to develop a unique technological solution for the problem of finding and managing services for the older Americans and Americans with disabilities. You will have the chance to network with individuals across government.

APPLY NOW

If this opportunity sounds like a perfect fit you, apply now or share the opportunity with  someone.  Applications will be open from May 5, 2014 – July 16, 2014.

INTERNAL ENTREPRENEURS

Scott Cory, Administration for Community Living
Jason Bennett, Administration for Community Living

Developing a Data-Driven ACF Workforce

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ven-workforce/

In response to a need to improve the use, understanding, and application of child welfare data, a team from the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) pilot tested the application of advanced visual analytics and short training videos for Children’s Bureau regional office staff. Survey results were overwhelmingly positive: Regional office program specialists felt that the new visual tool increased job productivity, and the short training video proved an effective training method.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


Developing a Data-Driven ACF Workforce:
Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

Regional child welfare program specialists work closely with states and tribes to improve services to children and their families in the child welfare system.  One area that has become increasingly more critical to their work is using data to identify, explore, and better understand state performance in child welfare outcomes. This task requires easy access to intuitive and relevant data, knowledge and understanding of key outcomes and data sets, and analytic skills.

However, the way we typically present and report on data to child welfare staff is cumbersome and difficult to digest. For example, the most prominent data report for staff, the Children and Family Services Review Data Profile, is presented in a Word document consisting of 16 pages of text, 25 footnotes, and tables with almost 700 individual cells of data. Further, trainings offered to staff seeking to better understand the data tend to be provided in one or two-hour blocks of time via webinar format and are not recorded for later viewing.  Regional office staff overwhelmingly reported in our baseline survey that this training format is not conducive to increasing their understanding and use of data.

Our HHS Ignite project set out to test out a more intuitive way to present our data – a way that allows users to quickly see trends and areas needing improvement. Using an agile development approach and bi-weekly feedback from a Steering Committee composed of regional and central office staff, we used Tableau software to create a data tool that was intuitive, easy to use, and allowed staff the flexibility to drill down into the data and analyze performance by geographic dimensions and various child characteristics. Equipped with this information, staff can make more informed decision and recommendations. In fact, 100% of survey respondents said that this new data tool would be useful in their work. In addition, they indicated that the tool would make it easier to do their job, increase their productivity, and make it easier for them to make connections between data and child welfare practice. Many expressed eagerness to have the tool available for everyday use.

In the second part of our project, we created two short videos. The first video was an introduction to our project that provided basic information and context. The second video was a short, focused training video. The training video walks the user through the data tool functionality while building on a common scenario they face in their everyday work with state child welfare agencies. As a result, the video helps staff understand how to use the new tool itself, as well as how to better understand and use the data. Regional staff also reported that the video tutorial was easy to use, helped them better understand how to use the new tool, and was an effective training method.

The excitement from the staff about our pilot project has truly been remarkable. Not only did they say that this would drive them to integrate data into their everyday work, but they also really enjoyed working with the new tool. We received feedback through comments such as, “LOVE it!! It is VERY easy and intuitive”, “Slicing and dicing the data was delightful”, and “WAY COOL!!! A wonderful way to work with the data”. Staff told us that this tool is now essential to their work and they were already using it to prepare for meetings with states. Using these results and findings we are moving forward in exploring ways that we can scale-up our project and build on our success.

Team Members

Heather Swope (Project Lead), Administration for Children & Families
Valeria Fajardo, Administration for Children & Families
Kurt Heisler, Administration for Children & Families
Melinda Baldwin, Administration for Children & Families
Paul Kirisitz, Administration for Children & Families

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Brett Brown, Social Science Research Analyst, Administration for Children, Youth & Families, Administration for Children & Families

Additional Information

Video: Project Summary and Overview

Education Through Wireless SMS

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-wireless-sms/

As a tool developed to help new parents, Text4Baby leverages wireless technology to educate new mothers about their health and the health of their babies.

Each year in the US, over 500,000 babies are born prematurely and an estimated 28,000 children die before their first birthday. Identifying and promoting promising innovations in health communication is a critical part of the HHS priority.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) partnered with the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition; Voxiva, a technology company; CTIA-The Wireless Foundation; and other Federal and non-Federal organizations to create and launch text4baby, a free mobile (cell-phone) text message service that provides pregnant women and new mothers information about their health and the health of their babies.

The text messages cover the entire period of pregnancy and the first twelve months of life, and address important health issues such as smoking, immunization, nutrition, mental health, and safe sleep.

Since the February 2010 launch, more than 56,000 individuals have signed up for the program and receive three text messages a week.  Collectively, over 2 million text messages have been sent to program participants.  Over 300 outreach partners, including state and local governments, major health insurers, and academic organizations, have signed on to promote the service.

RELATED WEBSITES

Text4Baby

Electronic Health Records in Action

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...rds-in-action/

In response to the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Indian Health Service leveraged its existing electronic health record to rapidly develop, validate, and implement a national electronic surveillance system to provide timely information on influenza-like illness, influenza vaccination rates, and potential adverse events following vaccination.

Expanding the use of health information technology, specifically the electronic health record (EHR), is a pillar of the Affordable Care Act. EHR systems can help detect and monitor public health emergencies and focus responses by integrating patient care and public health.

In response to the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Indian Health Service (IHS) used its existing EHR, through collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to rapidly develop, validate, and implement a national electronic surveillance system covering over 60% of its facilities serving the historically vulnerable American Indian and Alaska Native population.

This new surveillance system, the IHS Influenza Awareness System (IIAS), provided timely information on influenza-like illness, influenza vaccination rates, and potential adverse events following vaccination. Its results allowed for strategic allocation of limited resources during the pandemic. Because it used existing, routinely collected EHR data, the system accomplished these outcomes at minimal cost.

IIAS reports are posted weekly at http://www.ihs.gov/flu. IHS is currently expanding this scalable system to include other health conditions. The IIAS highlights how EHR systems can improve public health responses by providing timely health information to both clinicians in the field and agency decision makers.

Electronic Patient Tracking in Disasters

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-in-disasters/

Having the most up-to-date information during disasters is essential in providing the best care. Through its novel use of technology, the Bethesda Hospitals’ Emergency Preparedness Partnership Patient Tracking and Locating System empowers hospital emergency management staff with real-time information, assuring key decision makers have the information necessary to make timely decisions.

This unique innovation, a collaboration of public and private institutions, overcomes traditional challenges hospitals face during disasters, where large surges of incoming patients place a major burden on limited hospital resources. Through its novel use of technology, the Bethesda Hospitals’ Emergency Preparedness Partnership (BHEPP) Patient Tracking and Locating System empowers hospital emergency management staff with real-time information about incoming patient counts, severity status, and location, assuring key decision makers have the information necessary to make timely decisions critical to patient care.  Early successes include 100% accountability for patient transfers between hospitals, and a reduction of a historically 30 minutes to an hour, paper-based discharge process to a matter of minutes.  The destination hospital now has immediate access to electronic patient data on the portal and time to prepare for the transferring patients’ arrival.

The BHEPP Patient Tracking and Locating System directly supports HHS’s goals for protecting American’s health and safety during emergencies and promoting adoption and meaningful use of health information technology.  It is a cost-effective, exportable model that promotes the re-use of existing hospital investment in technology and can be used to manage the flow of patient and information in diverse situations.

Electronic Tracking & Transport of the Nation’s Organ Transplant System

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...splant-system/

The Health Resources and Services Administration is working to revise the existing organ transplantation system and include electronic components for identifying organs and tracking their movement, to minimize the potential for misdirection or other delays in organ transportation and reduce the chance of incorrect transplantation.

The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) collects more than 8,000 organs from deceased donors each year, and more than 22,000 organ transplants are completed annually. Use of electronic information capture provides a means of improving safety by eliminating the risk of manual transcription error, and speeding up the information transfer process.   It is the Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) belief that a revision of the OPTN organ identification, labeling, packaging, and transport system to include electronic components for identifying organs and tracking their movement will minimize the potential for misdirection or other delays in organ transportation and reduce the chance of incorrect transplantation. Among the key electronic elements that are being considered during the revision are: (1) digitized organ identification and organ container labeling using a system such as bar codes or Quick Response (QR) matrix bar codes, and (2) organ container tracking/tracing process through technologies such as Radio Frequency Identification Devices (RFID) and Geo Position Satellite (GPS) tracking.

An electronic organ tracking system will have several important public health benefits, including: minimizing the potential for misdirected or delayed organ transport, reducing the chance for incorrect transplantation, eliminating manual transcription errors, accelerating information transfer about the organs to key program stakeholders, and capturing extensive organ transport data and logistical information that will provide invaluable to the OPTN for optimizing organ allocation and minimizing geographic variability in organ access for people waiting for transplantation. External Entrepreneur David Cartier and Internal Entrepreneurs Joyce Somsak and Richard Durban are working with OPTN to update the current system.

To date, David has been field testing the electronic tracking system that has been developed at various sites to improve the product.  Additionally, David has briefed the OOPTN Board of Directors on progress being made through the project and the plans to have a fully deployable application built by 2014.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR

David Cartier

Fast-Screening CE-MS Method for Bacteria Through Protein Pattern Recognition

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ast-screening/

A team from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stationed in the port of San Juan, Puerto Rico tested a fast-screening method to identify bacteria in food samples. The method, already established academia, was validated in their government labs. Once expanded, this process could greatly shorten the time it takes to identify bacteria in food samples.

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Fast-screening CE-MS method for Bacteria through Protein Pattern Recognition: Watch the 5 minute pitch

Project Summary

The FDA tests samples of food for contamination of bacteria to help ensure the safety of our food system. In 2012, the FDA oversaw 11,136,599 shipments of food coming into ports across the country. Of these, less than 2% were actually able to be examined. (View source)

From the day a shipment of food arrives in a port, the FDA has only 4 days to test whether this food is safe to eat. If they are not able to test the food for microbes within this timeframe, the food is released into the food system anyways. However, the conventional microbiological procedures used are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Further, this team, based in San Juan, Puerto Rico, must send samples of the food to Atlanta for analysis.

This team is exploring whether a “fast-screening” methodology for microbe identification that has been used in academia can be used in FDA operations. The methodology uses capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) to develop protein pattern recognition by an electropherogram for bacterial samples in food without sample preparation. With the fast-screening method of CE-MS protein-pattern recognition, samples could be analyzed in as little as 30 minutes to determine the presence of bacteria. The use of this method could greatly shorten analysis time and result in a safer food system.

For their Ignite project, this team validated with prepared samples the capillary electrophoresis step in this coupled process. Their next steps include validating the process using actual food samples (instead of prepared samples) to measure bacterial recovery before expanding their testing to include mass spectometry.

This proposal builds on a previous effort of the CDC that successfully identified a specific type of tuberculosis. If successful, this idea might also be applied to other pathogenic organisms such as shigella, bacillus, anthrasis, and also viruses in the future.

Team Members

Jose Moreno (Project Lead), Food and Drug Administration
Jose Velez, Food and Drug Administration
Fernando Gonzalez, Food and Drug Administration
Hector Espinet, Food and Drug Administration
Osvaldo Rosario, Food and Drug Administration
Joseph Bloom, Food and Drug Administration

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Adaberto Cajibas, Supervisory Chemist, Office of Regulatory Affairs, Food and Drug Administration​

IMAGES

FDA-iRISK: A Fast Tool for Food Safety

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...food-safety-2/

Which foods and contaminants are public-health priorities? Collaborating with many partners, the Food and Drug Administration developed FDA-iRISK to address that question. The online system simultaneously ranks public-health risks from multiple contaminants, in multiple foods and calculates how contamination and illness from each would change with changes in food-production practices.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) created a new tool to answer a key question: Which foods and contaminants are public-health priorities?  Collaborating with many partners, the agency developed FDA-iRISK into an on-line system that can

1. Simultaneously rank public-health risks from multiple contaminants, in multiple foods;
2. Calculate how contamination and illness from each would change with changes in food-production practices; and
3. Do it faster, via pre-built mathematical functions and templates.

Risk models that estimate public-health outcomes of food contamination and effectiveness of interventions provide crucial information for policy and prioritization decisions.  FDA-iRISK automates the time- and labor-intensive process of developing mathematical models to simulate risk and intervention in food-production chains, giving regulatory and industry decision-makers a systematic, faster way of comparing and ranking risks in the food supply and predicting best solutions.

FDA collaborated with the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied NutritionRisk Sciences International, and others to make FDA-iRISK widely available, for free, including to food-exporting countries. Since its October 2012 release, the FDA-iRISK site has garnered more than 1,000 visits representing every continent.  FDA-iRISK also fills the need for a systematic repository and knowledge base of risks and solutions in the global food supply.

RELATED WEBSITE

FDA-iRISK

FDA-TRACK Gallery Submissions

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...y-submissions/

As part of President Obama’s Open Government Initiative, the Food and Drug Administration created FDA-TRACK, the first federal agency-wide performance management program. FDA-TRACK analyzes and reports monthly performance on 114 offices and 8 key initiatives.

As part of President Obama’s Open Government Initiative, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) created FDA-TRACK, the first federal agency-wide performance management program. FDA-TRACK analyzes and reports monthly performance on 114 offices and 8 key initiatives. Each quarter, the FDA-TRACK team utilizes statistical models to analyze monthly performance data from each office/initiative. Over 20 briefings are conducted each quarter whereby responsible office directors present their data to FDA executive leadership, bringing together the most senior officials face-to-face and facilitating communication and decision making. Results are posted to the FDA-TRACK website, allowing stakeholders to monitor progress on over 650 performance measures and 100 key projects. In less than a year, the website has attracted over 250,000 visitors and 7,500 monthly subscribers, and was selected as a flagship initiative for the HHS Open Government Plan.

FDA-TRACK is also used for the reporting of our most high priority goals. Interested parties will be able to see our agency’s measures and progress towards work in critical public health programs such as expediting egg farm inspections and availability of the H1N1 vaccine, as well as operational support initiatives to improve the time to hire new employees and response time to emergency calls into our call center network.

RELATED WEBSITE

FDA-TRACK

WATCH RELATED VIDEO

FDA’s Anti-Counterfeit Device

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...terfeit-device

Traditional methods of detecting counterfeit products are effective but require expensive, sophisticated and frequently bulky instrumentation. To make this process more efficient, the Food and Drug Administration developed the Counterfeit Detection Device (CDx) and methodology to screen for counterfeit pharmaceutical dosage forms and packaging in a real-time non-destructive manner.

The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Office of Regulatory Affairs, Forensic Chemistry Center developed the Counterfeit Detection Device (CDx) and methodology to screen for counterfeit pharmaceutical dosage forms and packaging in a non-destructive manner.  Although traditional methods of detecting counterfeit products are effective, they require expensive, sophisticated and frequently bulky instrumentation, with testing performed in a laboratory by highly trained operators.

The CD3 is an inexpensive, rugged portable, hand-held, electronic device allowing ‘real-time’ rapid screening results in the field. It is simple to use and does not require special technical training.  The CD3 is being used at a number of points of entry, where inspectors screen drugs, associated packaging, and cosmetics to identify counterfeit, falsified and unapproved products. The battery-operated device emits wavelengths of light from ultraviolet to infrared.  The CD3 is used to examine tablets, capsules, powders, and packaging (inks, papers and covert markings). It has also demonstrated utility in examining products that have been tampered, re-labeled or re-glued. The CD3 is used to analyze numerous counterfeit products including drugs people take daily. The use of the device is being scaled to help improve the quality of medicines in areas with the greatest counterfeit drug problems, where bad products have been directly linked to adverse health consequences.

TEAM MEMBERS

Nicola Tanieri, Food and Drug Administration
Diane Lirhus, Food and Drug Administration
Elizabeth MacCorkell, Food and Drug Administration
Marcus Fairconnetue, Food and Drug Administration
Mark Witkowski, Food and Drug Administration
Elsie Figueroa, Food and Drug Administration
Fred Fricke, Food and Drug Administration

Forming Partnerships to Develop Lifesaving Technologies

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/projects/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/projects/

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From Outer Space to the Eye Clinic

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...he-eye-clinic/

Collaboration between NASA and the National Eye Institute led to the development of a clinical device for much earlier detection of cataracts that measure changes in alpha crystalline proteins in the lens of the eye which was adapted from a device created for use in outer space.

Cataract remains the primary cause of blindness in the world today. The ability to detect a pre-cataractous lens would allow those at risk to modify environmental risk factors, such as sunlight exposure, cigarette smoking, diabetes control, and alcohol consumption, to avoid or prolong the need for surgery.  Early detection would also be helpful in identifying patients for clinical trials evaluating drugs to prevent cataract formation.  However, until now, the only way to detect alpha crystallin levels and protein aggregation in the pre-cataractous eye was to remove the lens and perform chemical analysis.

Dr.  Manuel Datiles of the National Eye Institute (NEI) from theNational Institutes of Health and Dr. Rafat Ansari of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-Glenn in Ohio collaborated to develop a diagnostic tool using dynamic light scattering (DLS) technology used in the Space Station to non-invasively detect pre-cataractous changes in the lens.  Nuclear senile, or age-related cataract, the most common type of cataract, results from damage to lens proteins through oxidative stress.  Over time, the damaged lens proteins aggregate, causing the lens to cloud.  In the last few years, NEI investigators have shown that the molecular chaperone, alpha crystallin, prevents lens proteins from aggregating.  Specifically, alpha crystallin binds to the unraveled tips of damaged lens proteins. The bound proteins cannot then stick to one another, thus preventing protein aggregation and cataract formation.  Humans are born with a fixed amount of alpha crystallin. Cataracts begin to form as the supply of alpha crystallin is exhausted.

The DLS device measures the amount of unbound alpha crystallin in the lens to monitor lens health and cataract risk. The development of this device now makes it possible to monitor pre-cataractous changes in the lens to identify at-risk patients and test new anti cataract drugs. In addition, oxidative stress  (which cause the loss of alpha crystallin protein) is believed to cause aging and related ilnesses as well as radiation injury. Hence, Drs. Datiles and Ansari are collaborating with Dr. Walter Stark of Johns Hopkins Hospital and NASA physician-scientists to use the DLS to study aging related cataract and related illnesses like Alzheimer’s disease, as well as radiation injury in astronauts.

TEAM MEMBERS

Manuel Datiles, National Institutes of Health
Rafat Ansari, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
J. Samuel Zigler, John Hopkins University
Frederic Ferris, National Institutes of Health

RELATED PUBLICATION

JAMA Ophthalmology Publication

Getting more out of Video: NLM Video Search

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/nlm-video-search/

Finding the latest health recommendations that are both science-based and easy to understand can often be difficult. The recently developed National Library of Medicine Video Search is a new tool that lets you quickly search for words and phrases in Section 508-compliant historical medical and public health films created by the U.S. government.

National Library of Medicine (NLM) Video Search is a new tool that lets you quickly search for words and phrases in Section 508-compliant historical medical and public health films created by the U.S. government. NLM Video Search accurately and quickly searches digital videos with embedded transcripts. In addition to offering a full-text search of a film’s transcript, the tool graphically displays where a search word or phrase occurs within the timeline of a film. Clicking the timeline takes the user immediately to the part of the film where the word or phrase appears.

NLM Video Search is based on a combination of open-source and inexpensive commercial multimedia tools enhanced with speech recognition technology. It is easily integrated and customizable to fit any digital content, repository or web application. NLM Video Search holds tremendous potential for enhancing collaboration among government agencies by making videos of current lectures, conferences, governance committees, training meetings, and official observances more accessible.

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Health Data Consortium Affiliates Network

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...-in-residence/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...iates-network/

The Health Data Consortium’s Health Data Initiative Affiliates Network has established regional chapters across the country to work with state and local governments to liberate health care data, and replicate the success of the national Health Data Initiative in engaging entrepreneurs and the business community around the new data.

The Health Data Consortium, a collaboration among government, non-profit, and private sector organizations working to foster the availability and innovative use of data to improve health and health care, which HHS is a member of has established a regional network of affiliates. In the first year of development, the Innovator-in-Residence organized and expanded the Health Data Consortium Affiliate network.

The regional affiliates work to promote the ideals of open data in health around the country. They host events and build local networks of groups including startups, entrepreneurs, health companies, universities, government agencies, and other innovators to create an ecosystem around using open data to improve health outcomes for individuals and communities. Under the tenor of the Innovator-in-Residence, two affiliates held local datapaloozas.

More information on the Health Data Affiliates can be found here and more information on the HHS Health Data Initiative can be found here.

Health Information Exchange Accelerators

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-accelerators/

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) is working to accelerate health information exchange (HIE) by developing new tools that can reduce HIE implementation effort and cost for a wide range of health care entities including those that are not eligible for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Records (EHR) Incentive Program.

Health information exchange (HIE), such as sharing a patient’s medical information for the purposes of care coordination, is a critical success factor in achieving the quality improvement and efficiency objectives of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the HITECH Act. Thus, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has a strong policy interest in rapidly driving broad participation in secure health information exchange. To address this need, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) proposes to develop targeted, open source toolkits that can be rapidly and cost-effectively deployed by a wide range of health care entities including those that are not eligible for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) electronic health record (EHR) incentive programs (e.g. long-term care centers, skilled nursing facilities, surgery centers, home health agencies, imaging centers, public health departments).

The HHS Entrepreneur will work with the community of implementers to develop a standards based HIE platform built entirely from open source components.  The platform aims to disrupt the economics of directed HIE by demonstrated how standards based exchange leads to scalability and how open source components allow for inexpensive setup.

The platform will be piloted by a group of Accountable Care Organizations that have risk-based incentives to improve care efficiency across federate boundaries.  The initial use case will be sending “ADT Alerts”.   An “ADT alert” is a real-time notification of an admission, discharge, or transfer encounter sent to a care coordinator or primary care physician (PCP) that is used to effectively intervene in the care pathway.    Organizations using ADT alerts have shown reduction 30-day readmissions, improved outcomes and qualifying the PCP for higher Medicare reimbursements under the transitional care management CPT codes.  Other organizations have demonstrated that ADT alerts can be used to reduce the number of ED to inpatient transitions.  Effective interventions include activities such as scheduling a follow-up appointment after discharge, ensuring the patient understands discharge instructions, calling the ED to direct a patient to a less expensive admission and several other meaningful opportunities to affect the care pathway.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR

Mark Monterastelli

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


Healthcare Practitioner Credentialing Portal

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/heal...ialing-portal/

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is building a healthcare practitioner credentialing portal to streamline and simplify the credentialing of health care professionals.

Credentialing departments in hospitals, health plans, Federally Qualified Health Centers, long term care facilities, ambulatory surgical centers and others must obtain information on health care practitioners before granting privileges or membership. State licensing boards also obtain information prior to issuing a license or certification. Health care entities are required to obtain primary source verification, requiring them to reach out to multiple collection system to obtain the necessary credentialing information. Maintaining multiple, disconnected repositories of pertinent data used to credential health care professionals is expensive and ineffectual.

HRSA is engaged in a collaborative initiative to create a central portal (a one stop shop) for stakeholders, e.g. health care licensing boards, hospital credentialing departments and health care professionals to access and obtain necessary credentialing information. The project involves consolidating  or synchronizing relevant systems, which include HRSA’s National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB), the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) National Plan and Provider Enumeration System (NPPES), the CMS Provider Enrollment, Chain, and Ownership System (PECOS), and the Office of the Inspector General’s List of Excluded Individuals/Entities (LEIE). Consolidating the credentialing portion of these systems will provide ready access to pertinent data, achieve time and cost savings; service customers more fully, enhance the integrity and quality of the collective data and achieve economies of scale, and provide a platform to pass greater savings onto users.

ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION

HRSA is looking for two entrepreneurs with backgrounds in technology and data analytics, specifically the development and implementation of consumer service platforms. Following are desired skills and qualifications:

  • Visionary leader in business intelligence and data analytics who can solve sophisticated business problems with data searching, matching, etc.
  • Large-scale data mining and data/system integration experience
  • Experience with the planning, design and development of web portal with centralized reporting and analytical capabilities of multiple disparate transactional information systems
  • Extensive understanding of enterprise data management and methodologies for addressing challenges with data standardization, data architecture, data matching algorithms, and data modeling skills, both in detailed data modeling as well as object and entity modeling
  • Expert in portal technology (encompassing COTS software, the availability of technical experts, and component strength and weaknesses)
  • Knowledge of and experience with extraction, transformation and loading technology, system component and data integration
  • Knowledge of information technology security related to the protection of Personally Identifiable Information (PII)
  • Past project management experience, especially in design, implementing and measuring the success of pilots
  • Ability to engage with various stakeholder communities and create meaningful change
HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?

As an entrepreneur you have the chance to make a meaningful difference in lives of millions of Americans. This project will revolutionize how healthcare credentialing occurs. You will have the chance to network with individuals across government and health care sectors.

APPLY NOW

If this opportunity sounds like a perfect fit you, apply now or share the opportunity with  someone.  Applications will be open from May 5, 2014 – July 16, 2014. 

IHS Workforce Development: Going Lean to Understand Needs

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...e-development/

Providing the Indian Health Service (IHS) workforce with training and education in important clinical and public health topics is critical in meeting the needs of a population suffering from significant health disparities. Through interviews with multiple frontline staff including nurses, behavioral health professionals, physicians and emergency management specialists, this team deployed the Lean Startup methodology to develop a website prototype that allows professionals to rate and review training and educational material which can be accessed by their colleagues.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


IHS Workforce Development: Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

Providing the Indian Health Service (IHS) frontline workforce with health training and education is critical in meeting the needs of a population suffering from significant health disparities. The Nashville Area Office of the IHS has professionals working in small, rural, Tribal and IHS facilities across the eastern half of the United States. When these professionals seek information, their problem is not that they are unable to find information, it’s that there is too much information.

This team used Lean Startup methodology to better understand the problem and build towards solution. Through interviews with multiple frontline staff including nurses, behavioral health professionals, physicians and emergency management specialists, the team found that staff is often unsure whether or not certain trainings are worth the time and effort to attend. The team developed a web-based solution that creates a feedback loop from frontline staff to Area Office staff. More specifically, the solution would allow staff to rate and review training and education material shared by Area Office staff. It also provides a mechanism to assess value of information as staff can see the ratings and reviews from their colleagues.

Having completed their prototype, the website is currently under construction with the resources offered by the Digital Services Innovation Center in the General Services Administration. The project will continue to progress and we will pilot test the website with a small group of users with a narrow focus of topics including tobacco cessation, blood pressure, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Team Members

John Shutze (Project Lead), Indian Health Service
Bruce Finke, Indian Health Service
Scott McCoy, Indian Health Service
Harry Brown, Indian Health Service

Tim Ricks, Director, Nashville Area Office, Indian Health Service

Additional Information

Project’s Lean Canvas

Improving Beneficiary Access to Health Information

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/impr...h-information/

My Note: Page Not Found

Improving Health & Stability in Food Choices

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/projects/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/projects/

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Increasing Efficiency in Rule Making with Natural Language Processing

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...in-rulemaking/

The current manual process for sorting public’s comments to proposed regulations is costly, inefficient, and burdensome. This team used lean startup methodology to map out and identify the inefficiencies in current processes, and then tested a tool that used natural language processing to auto-categorize the public’s comments. This test validated the approach of using this natural language processing tool: The tool showed successful results in its first testing phase. Were this effort to be expanded, the team projects thousands of employee hours and millions of dollars in savings.

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Increasing Efficiency in Rule-Making:
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Product Summary

The goal of this project was to increase efficiency in the processing of public comments on regulations. Currently, the public submits comments on proposed regulations on the Regulations.gov website. For certain regulations, comments can number in the thousands. After the public submits its comments, agency staff and/or contractors then process the comments to get them to the subject matter experts. The subject matter experts then review the pre-sorted comments to determine which comments apply to their portion of the regulation. The agency then addresses the comments in the final rule.

The current method is in need of reform, as it varies from office to office, is costly and inefficient, and is burdensome on staff. For example, for a sample Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services rule, it took over 1,000 hours just to sort the public comments before the comments were even addressed. The process is also duplicative at times: When working under tight deadlines, contractors and agency staff may be performing the same sorting tasks in an effort to make sure the categorization is complete and accurate.

This project tested a tool that categorizes the comments to decrease the amount of time that contractors and staff spend sorting them. The tool specifically was “Content Analyst Analytical Technology tool (CAAT)” which sorted comments after agencies pull the comments from FDMS.gov, the docket management system used to collect public comments. Currently there is no such tool to our knowledge being used across the federal government.

The CAAT tool has two potential methods to sort comments. One is a user-defined function where the user trains the software (“the brain”) with related sample documents; defines the categories and provides examples; feeds the comments into the tool; and runs the categorization. The second is an auto-categorization function where the tool creates the categories without user input.

The categorization tool project has produced successful results in its first testing phase with HHS Ignite support, demonstrating savings of millions of dollars for just one pilot agency. The tool demonstrated the potential to save time and money, increase staff satisfaction, and do so with calculated accuracy rates. This project can be replicated and scaled not only across HHS, but also across the whole federal government.

Team Members

Oliver Potts (Project Lead), HHS Office of the Secretary
Katerina Horska, HHS Office of the Secretary
Sheila Bayne, HHS Office of the Secretary
Emma Di Mantova, HHS Office of the Secretary
Mindy Hangsleben, HHS Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT
Jim Wickliffe, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Martique Jones, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Craig Lafond, HHS Office of the Secretary
Kristin Tensuan, Environmental Protection Agency
Bryant Crowe, Environmental Protection Agency

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Jennifer Cannistra, Executive Secretary, Immediate Office of the Secretary, HHS Office of the Secretary

Innovative Design, Development and Linkages of Databases

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-of-databases/

As the largest funder of biomedical research in the world, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) directly and indirectly generates massive amounts of scientific data through research, grants, and contracts. The HHS Office of the Chief Information Officer and the HHS IDEA Lab want to build an innovative strategy to design, develop and link public-facing research database applications for the HHS.

The goal of this project is to create a solution to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS)  current problem of multiple, disparate data sources that simultaneously meets the requirements of two new White House memoranda (Increasing Access to Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research and Open Data Policy – Managing Information as an Asset).

Creating an HHS-wide repository of research data will be beneficial not only to HHS researchers, but to the scientific community as a whole. The power of linked data has already been demonstrated in other domains. For example, collecting data about where traffic accidents happen and then linking it with geospatial data provides cyclists with a way to avoid potentially dangerous routes.  Similar data linkages can happen with medical data, as has been demonstrated by the Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) Catalog and resultant biomedical research leading to new cures and diagnostics. There is tremendous potential to capitalize on the linked data capability with research data as well.

With this project, leads from Chief Information Officer (OCIO) and the HHS IDEA Lab hope to work with staff from the relevant research agencies (e.g. the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) to create a business plan mapping out the way in which HHS can effectively develop data linkages across the organization.

ENTREPRENEUR DESCRIPTION

OCIO and HHS IDEA Lab are looking for a strong entrepreneur with a background in technology, specifically the development and implementation of consumer service platforms. Below are a list of specific skills and qualifications desired:

  • Significant work experience using information systems and/or information technology in designing, developing and implementing databases. Candidate should have a proven track record of overseeing the building of databases, data linkage, and successes working with large sets of disparate data.
  • An advanced degree in information systems and/or information technology is preferred, but not required.
  • Understands of enterprise architecture and IT systems/design.
  • Experience in business development, and lean/agile methodology.
  • Demonstrates leadership and communications abilities to bring together a multitude of stakeholders with various interests in the process.
  • Embodies the entrepreneurial spirit with the capacity to lead and quickly innovate in a large bureaucratic environment.
  • Familiarity with the scientific publications process is desired, as this is where most of the unlinked data resides.
  • Familiarity with the HHS research agencies or biomedical research is helpful, though not required.
  • Past project management experience, especially in design, implementing and measuring the success of pilot
HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM THIS POSITION?

As an entrepreneur you have the chance to make a meaningful difference in lives of millions of Americans, by improving the public’s access to research data. You will have the chance to network with individuals across government.

If this opportunity sounds like a perfect fit you, apply now or share the opportunity with someone.  Applications will be open from May 5, 2014 – July 16, 2014. My Note: I did apply!

INTERNAL ENTREPRENRURS

Damon Davis, HHS IDEA LAB
Cynthia Colton, Office of the Chief Information Officer

Integrating Health Insurance Marketplace Data to Visualize Efforts and Impact

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...lace-outreach/

The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services streamlined its Marketplace outreach reporting pathway and developed prototypes for data visualizations for improved decision-making at CMS and HHS.

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Integrating Health Insurance Marketplace Data:
Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Health Insurance Marketplace, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and other parts of HHS have been tasked with conducting outreach efforts to reach the uninsured. Recognizing the importance of having accessible data to drive strategy and collaboration for Marketplace outreach efforts, CMS and HHS explored ways to improve the use of outreach and enrollment information as a feedback mechanism to improve decision making as to the allocation of resources.

This project had two components: The first was a focus on improving CMS’s data collection system, RECON (a custom implementation of Salesforce) to track activities and outreach for CMS Regional and Central Offices. After interviewing end-users and watching their actual interactions with the system, an “Activity Wizard” was created for RECON to address significant data entry and quality barriers. The RECON “Activity Wizard” was piloted with lead RECON users and is undergoing refinements for agency wide use during the upcoming fall Open Enrollment period.

The second component of this project involved the development of visual data dashboard prototypes that combined RECON data and Marketplace enrollment data. The goal of these prototypes was to demonstrate how the information could be used to find possible correlations in spikes in enrollment or account creation activities. Refinements of this prototype through end-user engagement will determine the data sources needed to be incorporated and the specific visualizations desired.

Team Members

Stephanie Magill (Project Lead), Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Bob Adams, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Marni Land, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Jermaine Burkhalter, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
John Hammarlund, Regional Administrator, CMS Regions V and X

Joining Forces to Fight Childhood Obesity

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...dhood-obesity/

To advance and accelerate progress in addressing the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) formed the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR).

In the United States more than 33 percent of children and adolescents are overweight or obese.  Because most obese children grow up to be overweight or obese adults, preventing obesity during childhood is critical.

To advance and accelerate progress in addressing the nation’s childhood obesity epidemic, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) formed the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research (NCCOR).

NCCOR’s mission is to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and application of childhood obesity research in an effort to halt—and reverse—childhood obesity through enhanced coordination and collaboration.

In building on each other’s strengths, CDC, NIH, RWJF, and USDA are advancing the field through complementary and joint projects, such as a $27 million study to evaluate community programs to reduce childhood obesity.

NCCOR is a unique example of how federal agencies are working with each other and with private partners to bring synergy and innovation to address childhood obesity. This public-private collaboration spurs action, provides strategic direction and is building a strong foundation of research to guide the nation’s efforts to prevent and reduce childhood obesity.

TEAM MEMERS

Laura Kettel Kahan, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Institutes of Health
Tracy Orleans, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Molly Kretsch, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Terry T-K Huang, University of Nebraska
Todd Phillips, Academy for Educational Development

Leveraging the Public to Catch Fugitives

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...tch-fugitives/

The Office of Inspector General is pursuing 170-plus fugitives who have defrauded Medicare, Medicaid, and taxpayers of hundreds of millions of dollars. Focusing attention on these health care criminals via the Most Wanted Health Care Fugitives Website effectively harnesses a previously untapped resource: the public.

The Most Wanted Health Care Fugitives Initiative is the Department of Health and Human Service’s Office of Inspector General’s (OIG) first-ever fugitives website and the first Federal Government listing focusing solely on criminals wanted for health care fraud.

In the Initiative’s first year, 10 fugitives were captured and held responsible for stealing millions of dollars. An international fugitive even turned himself in after discovering himself on the Most Wanted list. Hundreds of stories have appeared in print, radio, and on the three major television networks. Five other Inspectors General inquired about pursuing the idea. Most important, OIG has joined forces with American citizens to more effectively rid the Federal health care system of fraud.

OIG special agents, even with the help of other federal law enforcement partners, cannot be on every U.S. street corner, so tips are essential. The Most Wanted Fugitives website is updated frequently with new fugitive photos and profiles; a 24/7 hotline collects public tips. A newly redesigned website, the use of new media, traditional media outreach, and other communication tools keep the public informed of OIG’s fraud-fighting efforts.

In an era of fiscal belt-tightening, the Most Wanted Fugitives website reassures taxpayers the Government will catch those who scam the system while deterring others from doing the same.

Lighting the Way: NIOSH Cap Lamp

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...iosh-cap-lamp/

Underground mines are often dangerous confined environments with poor visibility. While recent cap lamps have been slightly updated, the functionality of these lamps has been unchanged since the 1914. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health designed a LED cap lamp that improves worker safety by better distributing light using specialized, programmable optics.

Underground mines are dangerous environments that often include dust, confined spaces and poor visibility. Statistics show that slip, trip, and fall (STF) accidents are the second leading cause of accidents in underground mining.  A cap lamp is the most important source of light for miners who depend heavily on visual cues to detect STF hazards and strike and pinning hazards posed by mining machinery.

While recent cap lamps have begun to incorporate light-emitting diode (LED) technology, the functionality of these cap lamps has been essentially unchanged since the 1914 Edison cap lamp.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) (part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) LED cap lamp design improves worker safety by better distributing light using specialized, programmable optics. This helps workers see the immediate hazards in their surroundings more easily. Human subject test results comparing the NIOSH cap lamp to commercially available LED cap lamps show detection time improvements of up to 194% in floor hazard detection and up to 79% in peripheral motion detection, and also as much as 54% reduction in disability glare.

The knowledge gained from this research has resulted in five major changes in the international standard for cap lamps, benefitting miners world-wide.   It is also expected to crossover to other industries and benefit other workers that use personal lighting such as military, security, and search and rescue personnel.

Making the Link Between Public Health & Aging

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-health-aging/

The rapid aging of the U.S. population is unprecedented but few public health professionals possess the skills to address the health needs of older Americans. To address this need, the Centers for Disease Control developed, “Improving Older Adult Health – Opportunities & Resources for CDC Professionals,” training.

The rapid aging of the U.S. population is unprecedented.  It has far-reaching implications for our nation’s public health system as well as for aging services and long-term care needs.  However, few public health professionals possess the specialized skills and knowledge to effectively address the health and health needs of older Americans.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) developed a course entitled, “Improving Older Adult Health – Opportunities and Resources for CDC Professionals,” to equip public health colleagues with the necessary skills and knowledge to promote and improve older adult health.

The course prepares participants to address aging-related issues by incorporating an informed and targeted focus on older adults within their work responsibilities and by developing an understanding of ways these issues may impact their work.  The course also addresses a public health imperative which compels health professionals to promote and pursue strategies to enable older adults to live longer, better.

CDC’s “Improving Older Adult Health – Opportunities and Resources for CDC Professionals” can be easily adapted to ensure that other HHS employees are better prepared to meet the needs of America’s growing older adult population.

MedlinePlus Connect

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...eplus-connect/

While health professionals are working to improve the quality of care at the clinical level using data, the National Library of Medicine (NLM), created MedlinePlus Connect, a new tool that links electronic health record systems to relevant health and wellness information from MedlinePlus.gov.

With increasing use of health information technology, patients and health care providers can access consumer health information at the point they need it in an electronic health record (EHR) system.

The National Library of Medicine (NLM), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), created MedlinePlus Connect, which links electronic health record systems to relevant health and wellness information from NLM’s authoritative consumer health website MedlinePlus.gov. MedlinePlus, available in English and Spanish, includes consumer health information from NIH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, other U.S. government agencies and trusted health information providers. MedlinePlus delivers videos, news, tutorials, images, and comprehensive health information, updated daily.

MedlinePlus Connect brings patients or health care providers in an EHR to consumer-friendly information directly related to their search. MedlinePlus Connect accepts information requests based on coding systems already used by EHRs, and supports the health IT standards used by certified EHR systems as part of the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Program.

NLM worked with the Institute for Family Health (IFH), a group of community health centers, and piloted MedlinePlus Connect with IFH and Epic, an EHR provider. MedlinePlus Connect is easy-to-implement and free to any EHR system and its users.

TEAM MEMBERS

Joyce Backus, National Institutes of Health
Stephanie Dennis, National Institutes of Health
Naomi Miller, National Institutes of Health
Joseph Potvin, National Institutes of Health
Serena Burgess, National Institutes of Health
Maxine Rockoff, Columbia University

RELATED WEBSITE

MedlinePlus

Million Hearts Initiative

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ts-initiative/

Public-private partnerships can make significant impact on the state of the nation’s health. Learn how the public and private sectors are using innovative approaches to collaboration, information dissemination, and project management to prevent heart disease and stroke, two of the nation’s leading causes of death.

Million Hearts™ is a national initiative to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes in America over five years. The initiative will achieve its goal through improved clinical and community performance on four key evidence-based prevention strategies: appropriate use of aspirin, blood pressure control, cholesterol management, and smoking cessation.  As a result of the initiative, federal agencies have created a uniform set of measures to monitor clinical performance in implementing the interventions and have aligned incentives for clinicians and health systems to achieve high performance. In addition, clinical innovations to health care delivery and payment systems—health homes, patient-centered care homes, bundled payments, and accountable care organizations—will further improve focus on achieving the strategic targets. While the initiative was just launched in September 2011 and the number of events prevented is not yet known, these innovative approaches are exceeding expectations. Public and private partners are taking action to adopt the approach and interventions as their commitment to Million Hearts™.

The Million Hearts™ initiative is based on three key innovations: alignment of existing federal programs focused on the strategies, meaningful incentives for partners, and a multi-disciplinary approach to partner engagement and action. First, the initiative convened five teams (e.g., science, partnership, communication, field strategies, and management) to ensure a strategic focus for engagement and action. The result was a targeted approach to recruiting key partners to join the initiative and raise awareness of the initiative. New media technologies such as electronic pledges, Facebook and Twitter appeals, and other use of social media were key to initial mobilization of high-profile partners and alignment of efforts. In the first six months, this collaborative approach has yielded more than 4,000 pledges, 3,228 Facebook fans, more than 2,000 media mentions, and nearly 1.8 billion media impressions—a publicity value worth $1.5 million.

Second, Million Hearts™ used incentives to encourage collaboration from stakeholders. This approach included two key elements: making it easy for partners to co-brand their events and activities with the Million Hearts™ logo, and sharing core information resources among partner organizations. In the past 6 months, this novel approach has resulted in more than 35 public and private stakeholder organizations working together to deliver aligned and focused prevention strategies. The results of the model have led to an escalating number of new partners who are joining the initiative.

Third, innovative management techniques were used to enhance partner opportunities. This included alignment of federal programs for clinical care quality measures and supporting clinical quality initiatives that provides great potential to ensure maximum outcomes from preventive health care services. This approach enabled the support Million Hearts™ while minimizing the need for significant new financial resources.

RELATED WEBSITE

Million Hearts

Modernizing CDC Mortality Data and Analytic Tools

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/mode...nalytic-tools/

My Note: Page Not Found on May 23, 2014

Modernizing the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...f-all-doctors/

The Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services is working to improve one of their most in demand datasets, the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System. They are working to enhance usability, scalability and data quality.

Managed by the Center for Program Integrity (CPI) at the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services (CMS), the National Plan and Provider Enumeration System (NPPES) is the National Enumeration System responsible for assigning the National Provider Identifier (NPI) as mandated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). The NPI is the unique identifier for healthcare providers and facilitates electronic transactions including eligibility and claims status inquiries and responses, referrals, remittance advices, etc. Currently over 4 million NPIs have been assigned to health care providers and over 4.3 million changes have been accepted to their records in NPPES.  The use of the NPPES database has increased over time. On average more than 2,000 users download the publicly available file monthly and 2,000 to 10,000 users access the system on a daily basis. Now, more than ever the NPI is being analyzed by the health industry for additional uses, prompting more data requests from the industry.

Often the data in NPPES is out of date because sometimes the data entered upon the initial enumeration is rarely or never updated by the provider. The purpose of this project is to upgrade and improve the quality of data in NPPES by identifying options for innovative and cost effective methods to encourage record maintenance and verify self-reported data using internal and external sources, such as:

  1. Medical licensure information from State medical boards
  2. Geographical data to validate the address of health care providers
  3. Checks against Internal Revenue Service tax identification numbers
  4. Enabling delegation authority so others may more easily manage NPPES records on provider’s behalf
  5. Allow for two-way sharing of data in NPPES to other CMS system such as PECOS (the provider Medicare enrollment system)
  6. Create public and internal application programming interfaces (APIs) that will make the NPPES data easier to use by the public and as an internal resource for HHS and CMS.

The vision is for the internal API to assist in CPI’s core mission of preventing waste fraud and abuse in our health care system.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR

Alan Viars

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MONAHRQ – My Own Network, powered by AHRQ

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...wered-by-ahrq/

Organizations have information & data that is of interest to people at the local level but developing a way to report it can be expensive and time consuming. MONAHRQ, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality changes this. It is a free software product that helps organizations generate their own healthcare reporting website quickly and easily.

People need access to local information about health care services.   Patients and their families need to know about the quality of health care at local hospitals, the costs of elective surgery, and how to choose experienced providers.

Many organizations have the information that can support these decisions.  But developing a way to report it to the public is expensive and time consuming.

MONAHRQ was developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ) to address this problem.  MONAHRQ is a free software product that helps organizations generate their own healthcare reporting website quickly and easily.  MONAHRQ reads in local data or measure results, analyzes and packages the information, provides website customization options, and generates a fully functioning reporting website for the organization to host.  MONAHRQ can help any organization get up and running with public reporting—state and local data organizations, quality reporting collaboratives, hospital systems, health plans, and individual hospitals.

MONAHRQ directly supports the Department of Health and Human Services’ mission to improve the quality, safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans by helping provide people with information on the quality and costs of local health care.

RELATED WEBSITE

MONAHRQ

Moving Drug Addiction Science into the Mainstream

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/sammies/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...he-mainstream/

Nora D. Volkow of the National Institute on Drug Abuse was a finalist the category of Science and Environment for having demonstrated that drug addiction is a disease that changes brain function and created new strategies for treating patients with substance abuse issues.

Dr. Nora Volkow conducted groundbreaking research that has moved drug addiction science into mainstream medicine, demonstrating that addiction alters brain function and is a disease, not simply the result of poor judgment or personal weaknesses.

As director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for the past decade, Volkow has used findings from cutting-edge research to promote the study and development of more effective intervention strategies to prevent and treat drug abuse and addiction. She has made significant strides to curb the intertwined epidemic of HIV/AIDS and drug addiction, worked to stem the high rates of prescription opioid abuse and explored innovative medication strategies to treat drug abuse and addiction.

“She’s taken the National Institute on Drug Abuse and made it a neuroscience institute,” said Dr. Larry Tabak, principal deputy director at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “She was an early proponent of the concept that addiction is a disease of the brain. This has had profound implications for our ability to identify people who are most at risk and develop evidence based interventions that work.”

Dr. David Shurtleff, NIDA’s acting deputy director, said Volkow’s early work with imaging showed that the “addictive brain is different than the non-addicted brain,” and that a deeper understanding of the multiple circuits that become disrupted in addiction is the key to developing medically-based treatments.

In addition, Volkow has shown that the part of the brain called the orbital frontal cortex, which allows people to anticipate consequences, does not have the same metabolism rate in an addicted person, leaving that individual unable to put the brakes on addictive behavior, according to Joanna Fowler, senior chemist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, a Department of Energy funded research institution. Volkow’s research also has shown that addiction can impact all levels of society, from the most affluent to the most destitute.

Using this and other research as a springboard, Volkow has employed the resources of NIDA to impact drug addiction treatment in several ways.

With one million people in the United States living with HIV, and about 50,000 new cases occurring each year, Volkow has led a major initiative to identify the best strategies to implement the “Seek, Test, Treat and Retain” approach that identifies high-risk populations, including substance abusers and those in the criminal justice system, tests them for HIV, begins highly active antiretroviral therapy for those who test positive and provides the necessary support to help these individuals remain in treatment.

A 2010 Canadian study supported by NIDA showed that aggressive use of antiretroviral therapy was associated with a 50 percent decrease in new yearly HIV infections among injection drug users.

Volkow also led the support of research to provide greater access to evidence-based drug abuse treatments, including medications, and to encourage the integration of HIV and substance abuse treatment in primary care.

In another initiative aimed at addressing the growing abuse of prescription pain killers, Volkow helped create 12 Centers of Excellence for Pain Education at the NIH to develop, evaluate and distribute pain management curriculum resources for medical, dental, nursing and pharmacy schools. Under her leadership, NIDA is coordinating an NIH-wide effort to reach out to health care professionals and teach them about pain and its treatment. In addition, NIDA and the Food and Drug Administration are working together to develop an over-the-counter medication to prevent overdoses by rapidly reversing the reduced breathing that results from misuse of opioid drugs.

A third effort spearheaded by Volkow involves exploring new vaccines to aid addiction treatments. This immune-based strategy, actively being pursued through preclinical research and clinical trials, has already produced promising results that soon could translate into more effective medications to decrease drug use among patients who produce high levels of antibodies against cocaine or nicotine.

Thomas McLellan, president and CEO of the Treatment Research Institute, said Volkow has been “really influential in changing the public and governmental perceptions of the substance abuse problems from a character and pathology issue to an acquired, heritable disease that is preventable and treatable.” He said she has been pursuing a science-based strategy that emphasizes “fact over ideology,” and focuses on new ways to attack the problems.

Volkow was born in Mexico and received her medical degree from the National University of Mexico. Her father was a pharmaceutical chemist who had come to Mexico with his grandfather, Leon Trotsky, the Marxist revolutionary who was expelled from Russia by Josef Stalin in 1929 and exiled to Mexico where he was later murdered.

“In my family, I grew up immersed in a culture that taught us the importance of doing something that will improve the lives of others, and I have devoted myself to research, specifically around drug addiction,” she said.

“The issue for me was whether I could play the important role of transforming addiction from a criminal behavior to a disease of the brain. It was my studies that first documented that the brains of people addicted to drugs were different from those of the non-addicted,” she said. “That gave me a unique opportunity to use that knowledge to try and change the culture.”

Content is from the Sammies website and more information can be found here.

Moving Towards Energy Efficient NIH Laboratories

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...fficient-labs/

Laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are energy intensive facilities using five to ten times more energy per square foot than an average office building. Reducing utility consumption makes it possible to accomplish more biomedical research without spending more money. This project captured energy consumption data from a sample of NIH laboratories. Initial findings validated the hypothesis, provide short-term recommendations, and support the further collection of data in order to improve lab design standards.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


Moving Towards Energy Efficient Labs:
Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

When designing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, equipment loads are one of the major contributors to internal heat gains in conditioned spaces. Currently, the NIH Design Requirement Manual for Biomedical Laboratories and Animal Research Facilities (DRM) requires every lab to support at a minimum 8 watts per square foot of equipment load. Many universities and institutions have started using lower energy utilization indexes based on their studies. Utilizing higher energy utilization indexes can result to oversizing HVAC systems, which can translate to increased construction costs and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation.

This project tested the hypothesis that equipment load design in NIH laboratories translate to oversized HVAC systems that operate at low part-load operation. Energy use of a sample of NIH laboratories was collected and analyzed. Due to the high number circuits that needed to be measured and limited energy meters, each meter was installed for one-week duration and rotated each week to measure a different circuit.

For equipment that operates constantly such as freezers, refrigerators, incubators, and biosafety cabinets, valid conclusions can be drawn about their daily energy consumption. A database is being assembled to develop energy reduction strategies by denoting other factors associated with their condition such as age, ambient temperature, time of operation, and maintenance. Based on this project, failing to provide preventative maintenance on ULT freezers and incubators translated to the units consuming 12-25% and 15% more energy, respectively. Installing timers on A2 biosafety cabinets saves approximately $250 annually. These strategies are easy to implement with very little capital investment that can translate to huge energy savings if it were adopted throughout an entire research institution.

No larger strategy recommendation can be made at this time with high degree of confidence. Because specific lab operation can vary from week to week; a longer period of data collection is needed to ensure that the full range of energy use is represented in the metered data. To supplement the data that has already been collected more energy meters would need to measure the energy consumption for all circuits in a given lab simultaneously over a longer period of time. Interviews with the lab researcher would be needed in future studies to assess the diversity of lab equipment operation to ensure maximum operating conditions are captured during the measurement period.

The NIH DRM promulgates minimum performance design standards for NIH owned and leased new buildings and renovated facilities. The NIH distributes more than 80% of its funding to almost 50,000 competitive grants to more than 300,000 researchers at more than 2,500 universities, medical schools, and other research institutions in every state and around the world and all these labs also adhere to the NIH DRM. The NIH DRM is also used internationally as the gold standard for lab design; therefore energy saving realized from right-sizing HVAC equipment would likely be replicated and expanded internationally to both public and private sector labs.

Further studies are still needed to develop equipment load database; however, the HHS Ignite (beta) program provided the catalytic resources to launch the study.

Team Members

Leo Gumapas (Project Lead), National Institutes for Health
Rajib Chainani, National Institutes for Health
Sy Sadighi, National Institutes for Health
Don Guan, National Institutes for Health

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Susan Hinton, Division of Environmental Protection, Office of Research Facilities, Office of the Director, National Institutes for Health

NIAD FreeStuff: Stretching Tax Dollars

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...g-tax-dollars/

Why spend taxpayer money on a new microscope or chair if someone at the same government agency has that item and no longer needs it? NIAID FreeStuff provides an online forum where staff at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) can post and search for surplus equipment and supplies, resulting in waste reduction.

NIAID FreeStuff is a simple, user-friendly website where staff at theNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), can post and search for surplus equipment and supplies. The site fosters collaboration among laboratories and offices during a time of shrinking budgets. It encourages the reuse of already owned NIAD stuff rather than the purchase of new stuff.

NIAID FreeStuff promotes the reduction of operational expenses so that a higher percentage of budget dollars may be spent on mission-critical research, such as studies on HIV/AIDS, influenza, and other infectious diseases. NIAID FreeStuff has saved the institute thousands of dollars since its release in October 2011. The site is scalable and can be easily and inexpensively shared with other government agencies.  In fact, plans are underway to expand the site to all of the institutes at NIH.

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NIH RePORT: Public Access to Research

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...s-to-research/

Looking for health-related research supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)? Use the newly developed NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT), a one-stop shop for information on NIH research portfolio, serving as an effective tool to communicate with the research community, legislators, institutional officials, health advocates, and the general public.

The Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) is a one-stop shop for information on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) research portfolio, serving as an effective tool to communicate with the research community, legislators, institutional officials, health advocates, and members of the general public.  RePORT supportsDepartment of Health and Human Services’ efforts to:

1. Promote prevention and wellness by providing the public with easy access to information on NIH-supported projects and investigators, research findings, news, and clinical trials related to their personal health issues.  Through state-of-the-art tools for searching the NIH portfolio and innovative linkages to other information geared more toward consumers, we are able to communicate better the relationship of NIH-funded research to public health issues and deliver this information in terms the public can understand.

2. Accelerate the process of scientific discovery to improve patient care by allowing members of the research community to make connections with other researchers, find the latest information on past and ongoing research projects, develop ideas for new research, and obtain federal support for innovative research with a potential for high impact.

3. Promote program integrity, accountability, and transparency:  The extent of the information available through RePORT is unprecedented.  The success of, and acclamation for, RePORT has helped promote a culture of open government at NIH.

TEAM MEMBERS

James Onken, National Institutes of Health
Salley Rockey, National Institutes of Health
Radha Allam, NETE Solutions
Sanjay Naik, NETE Solutions
Sandeep Somaiya, NETE Solutions

Online Food Handler Training Project

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ining-project/

How do you train over 3,500 people each year in food sanitation when contending with a twenty percent reduction in staff? The Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Environmental Health Services’ solution to this problem is an online training designed to be efficient and culturally-relevant, involving multiple Federal and Tribal partners.

Recognizing the immense demand for food handler certification, conducting over 100 food sanitations trainings annually, the Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service (AAIHS), Division of Environmental Health Services (DEHS) didn’t have an option of hiring new staff.  In fact, they experienced a 20 percent drop in staff while high demand for their Food Handler Certification persisted.  To address the demand while not reducing services, the AAIHS and DEHS staff explored alternative methods for delivering services to tribal customers. In doing so, the Online Food Handler Training was developed.

The Online Food Handler Training provides food sanitation training in a format that is convenient for customers while also being low maintenance for DEHS staff.  Adult-learning techniques and cultural considerations were incorporated so the message would resonate with tribal customers, potentially leading to increased knowledge and improvements in food safety in tribal facilities.  For example the training scenarios involve workers in the fictional restaurant to illustrate food sanitation concepts in a way that is more relatable for food service workers; the names of the restaurant employees are based on bacteria and viruses that cause food borne illness.  The Online Food Handler Training application is capable of collecting feedback from users, allowing services to be continually improved.  While in-person trainings will continue to be provided, a conservative estimate is the Online Food Handler Training will be utilized by at least 10-20% of trainees, reducing the number of classroom trainings conducted by staff, ultimately reducing cost for the Department of Health and Human Services.

TEAM MEMBERS

Robert Bates, Indian Health Service
Tom Candelaria, Indian Health Service
Jeff Dickson, Indian Health Service
Debra Grabowski, Indian Health Service
Katie Hubbard, Indian Health Service

openFDA

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/president...ation-fellows/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/openfda/

openFDA, a new initiative to provide unprecedented access to FDA data and highlight projects in the public and private sector that use these data to further scientific research, educate the public, and save lives.

openFDA is an initiative of FDA’s Office of Informatics and Technology Innovation to provide a new level of access to a number of public high-value FDA datasets via RESTful APIs and structured raw file download. Currently, the project is in an early-development stage, with an alpha release of two datasets planned for spring 2014 and a larger public release later in the year. Additionally, openFDA will provide a platform for the community to interact with each other and FDA domain experts with the goal of spurring innovation around FDA data and creating new partnerships and opportunities between the public and private sector.

Presidential Innovation Fellow: Sean Herron
More information on openFDA

http://open.fda.gov.

Stopping a Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/sammies/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...itis-outbreak/

J. Todd Weber and the CDC Multistate Outbreak of Fungal Meningitis and Other Infections Response Team was a finalist in the category of Citizen Services Medal for having quickly identified contaminated medicine as the cause of a major meningitis outbreak in 2012, and led the national public health response, alerting 14,000 potentially exposed patients and providing treatment information to the medical community.

In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began receiving reports from health officials in Tennessee about patients diagnosed with a rare form of meningitis. This worrisome information set off alarm bells at the CDC, which quickly launched an emergency response team led by Dr. Jonathan Todd Weber, chief of CDC’s Prevention and Response Branch.

Weber and his team ultimately linked the outbreak to injections of a steroid, which had been produced by the New England Compounding Center in Massachusetts and distributed to 76 facilities in 23 states. While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Massachusetts Board of Pharmacy investigated the firm and halted further shipments of what turned out to be contaminated medication, the CDC worked with state and local health departments and clinical facilities to notify, in record time, approximately 14,000 potentially exposed patients.

They also helped identify the pathogen and developed tests to detect it; put an epidemiology team to work tracking the course of the outbreak; alerted doctors and health care facilities across the country to stop using supplies of the dangerous drug; provided guidance to physicians on the limited treatment options; and offered a steady stream of information to the public.

“This was the most successful outbreak response we have ever conducted,” said Dr. Ileana Arias, the CDC’s principal deputy. “More quickly than ever before, the CDC team identified what the problem was and where the problem came from, and assured rapid, direct notification of thousands of people who were potentially affected.”

As of April 8, 2013, there were 733 reported cases of patients with infections attributed to the tainted steroid, including 53 deaths in 20 states. Most of the deaths occurred early on during the outbreak, and dramatically decreased after Weber and his CDC team intervened.

Dr. Rima Khabbaz, the CDC’s deputy director for infectious diseases, said it is tragic that people died and were sickened because of the contaminated medication. But she added that the rapid response by Weber and his CDC team made a big difference.

“There is no question that they saved lives,” she said. “This was public health at its best; a quick and decisive response.”

Without early and prolonged treatment, fungal meningitis can lead to stroke and death. Many months of one or more antifungal drugs are required for treatment. Patients exposed to the tainted steroid, which was used to treat back, joint or neck pain, experienced headaches, fever, stiff neck, back pain, dizziness, weakness and loss of balance. This made it essential to track down and assess all those who were exposed, as soon as possible.

Dr. Beth Bell, director of the CDC’s National Center for Emergency and Zoonotic Diseases, said Weber ran CDC’s emergency operations center, “juggling many, many balls in the air while at the same time keeping track of the big picture.”

She said “the outbreak was very complicated,” and required engaging a wide variety of experts.

“They were trying to come up with guidance when information was very, very limited. In a situation like this with a lot of unknowns, there was a need to marshal a lot of people with different expertise,” said Bell.

She said Weber was “a central point of reference,” the individual responsible for coordinating multiple and simultaneous activities in short time frames with the CDC’s chief health officer and the epidemiology, clinical, laboratory, policy, legal and communications teams.

This included the work of CDC’s laboratory scientists, who identified the pathogen causing the illness and in just two days developed tests for its detection. The CDC scientists also identified the specific organisms found in the contaminated medication vials and rapidly tested more than 800 specimens.

Weber’s team provided frequent updates for more than 240 clinical and professional organizations, held clinician conference calls that reached 5,300 participants, released multiple health advisories, and provided regular updates for the press on the CDC’s websites that were accessed more than a million times.

While the response had many moving parts, Weber said the bottom line was protecting public health.

“It was a new infection that had really never been seen or studied before. We had the potential for a new disease infecting many thousands of people in many different states,” Weber said. “Our goal was to get those people notified and help them get properly diagnosed and receive care.”

James Blumenstock, chief of the public health practice at the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, said the CDC’s public health response represented “skillful and artful execution.”

“The CDC team had the spirit of collaboration, commitment and discipline to maintain 24-hour communication and coordination. There was the field investigation and data sharing between federal and state governments. It had every twist and turn you can think of,” said Blumenstock.

Below are is an interview with Tom Fox, from the Partnership for Public Service and J. Todd Weber on his  and his team’s innovative work .

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Content is from the Sammies website and more information can be found  here.

Piloting Green Laboratories

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...-laboratories/

Two microbiologists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were concerned about the landfill waste being generated from the plastic containers used in lab experiments. To make their labs green, they developed a procedure that autoclaves and sterilizes the plastic making it safe to recycle, resulting in 13,772 pounds of recycled plastic.

Concerned about the landfill waste being generated from the plastic containers being used in lab experiments, two microbiologists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed a new procedure to make lab containers, which formerly held bio-hazardous material, safe for recycling.

They worked with the CDC’s Biosafety Office to create a procedure that would autoclave and sterilize the plastics so that they would no longer pose a biosafety threat.

Implementation of the sterilization process was an innovative step that allowed large amounts of lab plastics to be recycled rather than sent to landfills.

In a 16-month period, a total of 13,772 pounds of solid plastic waste was recycled from the first four laboratories.  Through the laboratory recycling program, 6.7 percent of laboratory waste is now being diverted from the landfill.  Currently, the program is being expanded to six new laboratories.

Superbug Code Breakers

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/sammies/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...code-breakers/

Tara Palmore, Julie Segre and Team of the National Institutes of Health were awarded the 2013 Federal Employees of the Year designation for their work in stopping the spread of a deadly hospital-acquired infection through the first-ever use of genome sequencing to identify the source and trace the transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, creating a groundbreaking model for the health care industry.

During a nerve-racking 12-month period in 2011 and 2012, a rare, deadly strain of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was spreading through the nation’s premier research hospital.

Every effort to halt the outbreak was failing until a team of biomedical detectives led by Drs. Julie Segre and Tara Palmore at theNational Institutes of Health (NIH) used a revolutionary new technology to track and contain the infection.

In the end, 18 seriously ill patients acquired the bacteria and seven died from the infection—a tragedy for the patients, their families and the NIH. But the frightening episode prompted the NIH for the first time to sequence the bacteria’s DNA to decipher how the pathogen spread from patient to patient, which then allowed the doctors to detect the origins of the infections, trace the transmission path and implement robust measures to put an end to the outbreak.

This use of genomics could radically transform the way hospital-acquired infections are identified and halted, leading to quicker response times and saving tens of thousands of lives. There are nearly 100,000 deaths a year in the U.S. attributed to these infections.

“It is a groundbreaking advance in one hospital that will now have an impact across the world and will become the standard,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the NIH. “It is a fantastic example of taking a challenging medical problem and applying technologies in a new way to come up with a remarkable result. We now have a new weapon in the battle to stop the spread of drug-resistant organisms.”

Dr. John Gallin, director of the NIH’s Clinical Center, said the breakthrough by the NIH team is “a magnificent demonstration of how a hospital can contain these infections when they occur.”

“With this new genomic approach, we can now with exquisite precision track the evolution of an infection in a hospital and from one hospital to another, one city to another and one country to another,” he said.

When the cluster of infections began at the elite 243-bed research hospital, Palmore, along with Dr. David Henderson, led the infection-control team. Segre, who has been involved in the Human Genome Project for 20 years, and colleague Evan Snitkin worked on the bacterial sequencing.

The deadly multidrug-resistant bacteria strain known as Klebsiella pneumoniae first entered the NIH’s Clinical Center in June 2011 from a patient who had been transferred from a health care facility in New York. The NIH hospital thought it had taken steps to prevent patient-to-patient transmission, but another patient soon acquired the bacteria, followed quickly by multiple other cases.

After the second case, Palmore said she and her team “took rigorous outbreak control measures in escalating fashion” to stop the infection from spreading. Despite their best efforts, there still was no clear explanation of how the bacteria were spreading or where it all started. That’s when Segre stepped in.

By sequencing the DNA from bacteria from each of the infected patients, Segre was able to definitively trace the strain to a single source, the New York patient.

When combined with traditional epidemiology tracking data, the genome sequence results showed the New York patient’s bacteria were transmitted to other patients on three separate occasions. The sequencing allowed Segre and her colleagues to track the exact route of the infections as the microbes hopscotched around the hospital in ways that were somewhat unexpected.

Using the sequencing results, Palmore undertook intense infection control measures and vigilant hospital-wide surveillance to break the chain of transmission and stem the outbreak.

With a limited number of antibiotics available to fight these highly resistant bacteria, Palmore and Segre are hopeful that using this technology will become a standard approach for hospital infection control.

“We have demonstrated a new approach to hospital infection control based on innovation and genomic technology,” said Segre.

Below are two interviews with Tom Fox, from the Partnership for Public Service and Julie Segre and Tara Palmore on their innovative work.

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Content is from the Sammies website and more information can be found here.

Portal System: Linking Healthcare Clinics

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...hcare-clinics/

The Indian Health Service/California Area Office needed a better way of providing training and technical assistance to the 46 tribal and urban Indian health care programs in California, so they developed the IHS/CAO Portal System, a cost-effective, novel and easily accessible tool that enables health care staff at remote locations to access discipline specific online communities.

The California Area Office (CAO) of the Indian Health Service (IHS) is tasked with providing training and technical assistance to the 46 tribal and urban Indian healthcare programs scattered throughout an enormous geographic area.  These healthcare programs provide a myriad of services including; primary and specialty medical care, dental care, behavioral health, pharmacy, and outreach.  A cost-effective and efficient system needed to be developed to support customers who are not within the federal security boundary.

After serious consideration and analysis, the development team concluded that the problem is solved by the IHS/CAO Portal System, a collection of discrete online communities that are connected to each other and the IHS website through a common management framework. What differentiates the system from other available technologies is that it requires no licensing or expensive client access licenses; it reaches beyond federal intranets; and it supports the required level of customization.

The CAO Portal System is innovative because it:

  1. Re-purposes open source software to extend its functionality, specifically with the iterative Ticket Management System
  2. Fills a gap between federal information systems and our public website
  3. Creates a collaborative environment which can include both federal and non-federal stakeholders and subject matter experts
TEAM MEMBERS

Robert Gemmell, Indian Health Service
Kelly Stephenson, Indian Health Service
Steve Riggio, Indian Health Service
Beverly Miller, Indian Health Service

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Supporting Tribal Grantees: ACF Makes it Simple

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...kes-it-simple/

Navigating grant requirements can be challenging, particularly when forms are complex and staff turnover is high. The Tribal Child Welfare Team within the Administration for Children and Families Region VI Children’s Bureau has made it easy by creating a solution for improved accessibility to title IV-B grant funds.

The Tribal Child Welfare Team within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) Region VI Children’s Bureau created a solution for improved accessibility to title IV-B grant funds (non-competitive grant to serve Indian families and children who are at risk of abuse and neglect). This process included developing improved relationships with Tribal grantees to better understand how the processes and forms could be improved to match their needs.

Without this streamlined procedure to apply for title IV-B funds, many Tribal directors would not have the time or resources to apply. The new templates are user-friendly, are written in clear and concise language and have helped improve transparency in the application process.

The new templates also allow Tribes to make updates into the same document each year. This process allows for any new directors to review an entire five year cycle and update the document with information about what has happened in their program each year. This new approach minimizes the risk of losing funding because of staff turnover.

Since implementation two years ago, nearly all of the 67 recognized Tribes within the states of Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico are taking advantage of title IV-B funding.

Preparing for the Zombie Apocalypse

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ie-apocalypse/

Getting people motivated to be prepared for emergencies can be difficult, but a team from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stepped outside the box with their zombie preparedness blog resulting in some unprecedented results!

Using the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions’ (CDC) blog, Public Health Matters, the self-proclaimed “Zombie Task Force” crafted a witty but educational blog post about zombie preparedness, while regularly referring to real emergencies like hurricanes, floods, or earthquakes. Communicators stated that if people were prepared for a zombie apocalypse they were prepared for any emergency. Readers were told how to make a plan and emergency kit and how to stay informed using CDC’s emergency website, which provides up-to-date information on emergencies, tools for preparing, and training resources.

Stepping outside the box proved a success.  The blog went viral and trended on twitter; the traffic was so overwhelming that it crashed the CDC blog server.  Although only $87 was spent, the campaign achieved an estimated 3.6 billion impressions and had an estimated marketing value of $3.4 million. This campaign increased awareness of preparedness activities, involving new audiences that weren’t previously engaged. The success of this campaign demonstrates the importance of listening to your audience and harnessing the power of social media to deliver your message globally.  The success of the initial blog post has spurred many other products and partnerships, allowing CDC to reach a broad section of the population with an engaging and important topic.

The 100k Genome Project

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...to-its-source/

One in six Americans is sickened by foodborne illness each year. To help find the source of an outbreak to prevent further contamination and illness, the 100K Genome Project, developed through an innovative partnership among government, business and academia, is sequencing the genetic codes (genomes) of 100,000 strains of important food pathogens and making them available in a free and public database.

One in six Americans is sickened by foodborne illness each year, leading to an estimated 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths. Many food outbreak events are never linked definitively to a food source or agent. However, quickly pinning down the source of an outbreak is essential for connecting a food facility or farm responsible for contamination and preventing further illness.

To this end, “The 100K Genome Project”, born out of collaboration between Food and Drug Administration (FDA), University of California-Davis, and Agilent Technologies and growing quickly, is sequencing the genetic codes (genomes) of 100,000 strains of important food pathogens, such as Salmonella, and making them available in a free and public database at NIH’s National Center for Biotechnology Information.

This endeavor will increase, by nearly 100-fold, the number of food pathogen genomes available in the public domain, fostering development of tests that will identify a bacterium at a much faster rate than current methods permit. The database also promotes a safe food supply for all Americans by providing a developmental roadmap for strategies to trace invading food pathogens back to their source and by serving as a valuable model for how public-private partnerships may overcome otherwise intractable challenges to public health.

TEAM MEMBERS

Marc Allard, Food and Drug Administration
Eric Brown, Food and Drug Administration
David Lipman, National Institutes of Health
Steven Musser, Food and Drug Administration
Steve Royce, Agilent Technologies
Bart Weimer, University of California Davis
Paul Zavitsanos, Agilent Technologies

RELATED WEBSITE

100 Genome Project

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Publication Planning & Clearance Process Improvement Project

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...entrepreneurs/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...improvement-2/

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs (ASPA) seeks to re-engineer its publications planning and clearance process to better meet the needs of a communications landscape dominated by digital and social media.

Communications have fundamentally changed since the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) publications planning and clearance process was first created in the 1980s. This process was developed to help HHS:

  1. Create useful print and audiovisual publications;
  2. Prevent duplication of products within the Department or elsewhere in the government;
  3. Ensure consistency with HHS policy; and
  4. Control costs.

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs (ASPA) is using new methodologies, including, lean and agile, to modernize an outdated and outgrown clearance process and better measure the success of communications projects. Aligned with the Digital Government strategy, this new Strategic Communications Planning process shifts the focus from how communications are deployed to a deeper emphasis on who is receiving our message, ensuring we can measure the impact of those communications. In the long run, the new process empowers independent Agency decision making alongside collaboration across the department, presenting One HHS to the American public.

EXTERNAL ENTREPRENEUR

Kristann Orton

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The Body Weight Simulator

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ght-simulator/

With so many weight-loss tools, diets, and exercise programs, why are 2/3 of American adults overweight or obese? The Body Weight Simulator, an innovative online tool for personalized weight management, is a new and effective way that doctors, researchers, and policymakers can address this public health issue using the latest available science.

America’s obesity epidemic is a major public health issue that costs us billions each year. Though most people know that a healthy diet and regular exercise are integral to weight management, few resources have been available for planning specific, personalized lifestyle modifications to achieve and sustain an individual’s goal weight.  Existing online tools and mobile applications have tended to exaggerate weight loss.

Developed by the National Institutes of HealthBody Weight Simulator is the result of scientific advances in nutrition and metabolism that allow for realistic mathematical models of human weight change. This innovative online tool, which has been vetted by the scientific community and is being tested to determine practical utility, accurately predicts body fat and metabolism changes that occur during a diet and/or exercise intervention. Since its launch in August of 2011, the Body Weight Simulator has been accessed online by over 750,000 visitors, has been featured in several major media outlets, and was used in collaboration with United States Department of Agriculture to predict the effectiveness of a sugar-sweetened beverage tax. The simulator represents an important advancement for weight management professionals, policymakers, and researchers to help Americans achieve and permanently maintain a healthy weight.

TEAM MEMBERS

Kevin Hall, National Institutes of Health
Carson Chow, National Institutes of Health
Dhruva Chandramohan, Cornell University


RELATED WEBSITES

Body Weight Simulator

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The CDC Health Game Jam 2013

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...game-jam-2013/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tested the concept of using a 48-hour game-development challenge (game jam) as an effective means to build inexpensive demos of health-related games and to improve awareness of and interest in public health careers among those with 21st century tech skills. The event, the largest game jam of any type ever held in the US and the first game jam sponsored by the US Government, demonstrated that game jams can effectively and efficiently be used to build inexpensive demos of health-related games and improve awareness of and interest in public health careers.

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CDC Health Game Jam 2013: Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

According to the Entertainment Software Association, games are played by 58% of Americans—by both genders and by a wide age range. Positive health outcomes from the use of computer games are documented. Game Jams are a proven way to bring game developers together to address a specific theme in a competitive, yet collaborative atmosphere, constrained by both a deadline and a confined location (i.e., single venue and 48-hour duration).

CDC’s Health Game Jam 2013 was a pilot event designed to merge disease prevention and health care subjects with this game development approach. It was an opportunity for game developers (designers, artists, and programmers) to work directly with CDC subject matter experts during a 48-hour long period to develop games that address CDC’s and HHS’s public health priorities.

The winning team spent five days at CDC learning more about public health, the federal government, and worked directly with CDC subject matter experts to ensure the accuracy of the game they developed. While this opportunity was very well received by the members of the winning team, it may be worth making the opportunity to work directly with CDC staff available to any game jam participants.

For this event, the CDC partnered with the RWJF-funded Games for Health Project, the Georgia Game Developers Association, and Southern Polytechnic State University, and the CDC Foundation. The project team was also able to leverage the $10,000 in HHS funding to obtain an additional $19,000 in matching funds and in-kind donations. Seventeen CDC Subject Matter Experts participated during the Game Jam and 27 during the internship.

The event exceeded forecasts, while boosting interest in public health among contestants:

  • Game Jam Participants: 300
  • Game Demos Developed: 29
  • Impact on Participant Interest in Public Health Careers: Pre-event survey found 12% participants were interested in public health; Post-event survey found an increase to 50% of participants being interested in public health.

The event demonstrated that game jams can effectively and efficiently be used to build inexpensive demos of health-related games and to improve awareness of and interest in public health careers. Future plans include hosting a similar event in 2014 that builds on the lessons learned during the 2013 event, but also with a larger emphasis on evaluating the quality of games developed and the game’s effect on behavioral outcomes.

Team Members

Dan Baden (Project Lead), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Peter Jenkins, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Leigh Willis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Tom Savel, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Ben Sawyer, RWJF’s Games for Health Project
Tony Tseng, Savannah College of Art and Design, Atlanta
Andrew Greenberg, Georgia Game Developers Association

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Kristin Brusuelas, Senior Liaison Officer, Office of State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Public Health Professionals, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Ready, Cert, Go!

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/ready-cert-go/

The hiring process in federal government can at times be cumbersome and difficult. To streamline the process, the Office of Human Resources recently implemented Ready, Cert, Go!, a proactive Departmental Enterprise Hiring Strategy to more efficiently and effectively provide hiring managers with talented candidates.

The Office of Human Resources (OHR), part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration, recently implemented Ready, Cert, Go (RCG)!, a proactive Departmental Enterprise Hiring Strategy to more efficiently and effectively provide hiring managers with talented candidates. The RCG initiative resulted in standing registers of qualified applicants, which are available for interviews at a moment’s notice.  By preemptively announcing jobs and creating certificates, hiring managers no longer need to develop individual job announcements for each hiring need.

To begin RCG process, the Human Resources (HR) community analyzed attrition data, hiring trends, and budget submissions across HHS.  They determined that 67% of the projected hiring needs for fiscal year 2011, almost 4,000 positions, came from only 12 occupational series.  The HR community fostered strategic partnerships with the hiring managers at the Operating and Staff Divisions (OPDIVs and STAFFDIVs), as well as, with Subject Matter Experts to craft HHS-wide job announcements.

The first certificates were made available to managers on February 4, 2011 and managers are already making their selections.  This critical initiative is assisting our agency in reducing its hiring timeframes below the Office of Personnel Management 80 day requirement.  RCG has already reduced the amount of repetitive work spent on individual announcements and classification actions, while improving our customer service.

The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...ility-meter-4/

Coal dust in mines has a high risk of exploding if not properly controlled and has resulted in 64 fatalities and 18 injuries since the year 2000. The current method of testing the risk of explosibility of a mine can take weeks. To address this the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health designed a new meter that instantly determines risk of explosibility.

The mining process creates coal dust which is explosive if not properly controlled. Since 2000, 64 fatalities and 18 injuries have resulted from numerous coal dust explosions. These catastrophic events can happen when methane ignitions lift and then ignite the coal dust present in the mines. The application of inert, pulverized rock dust to the mine roof, walls, and floor is one of the main means for maintaining an incombustible dust mixture necessary to prevent explosions.

The current method used to determine whether enough rock dust has been applied requires sending a collected sample to a laboratory and then waiting days or weeks until results are received. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -developed Coal Dust Explosibility Meter  provides coal mines with a tool to immediately determine if more rock dust should be applied to maintain safe levels. The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter also considers dust particle sizes in its measurements. The finer the coal dust, the more explosible it is. The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter is a major improvement over the current method in that the current laboratory method cannot distinguish dust particle size and thus does not measure explosion potential. The Coal Dust Explosibility Meter evaluates particle size and indicates if more rock dust is needed to inert the finer-sized coal dust particles. Due to the commercialization and help of NIOSH, to date, over 200 meters have been purchased by the coal mining industry.

Project Boundary

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...-in-residence/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/project-boundary/

Project Boundary is an exploration of indoor proximity sensing beacons that could potentially create a more aware and intelligent workplace. The project explores the use of proximity sensors to deliver well-timed and contextually relevant triggers delivered to the user in order to encourage the adoption of healthy behaviors within the workplace. It hopes to explore added dimensions to the field of corporate wellness and seeks to gamify the interactions of the user with their physical surroundings. 

BACKGROUND

The concept of Project Boundary was conceptualized by the IDEA Lab’s Innovator in Residence – Naganand Murty and Nayan Jain – a White House Presidential Innovation Fellow, as an experiment in radically redefining workplace wellness.

Today’s corporate wellness platforms tend to center largely around health portals, and wellness services to enable the employees (users) to adopt and maintain activities that are beneficial to their health. However, many of these programs have not been able to effectively engage employees, and corporate wellness often does not tend to register high on an employee’s radar, when they think about their own health and wellness in the workplace.

Our project is an exploration of the following design intent – how might we better engage users within the bounds of where they are, and what they do over the course of a regular day at work, and get them to do just a little bit more towards benefiting their health.

In order to fulfill this intent, we intend to explore a novel approach to corporate wellness, using proximity sensing to gamify the workplace. We hope to demonstrate how an everyday physical space might be transformed to become something more relevant to addressing the wellness needs of users, by engaging them where they are, as they go about their daily work. We want to re-envision the workplace (in conjunction with the user’s mobile phone) as an intelligent ecosystem that enables the user to maintain and adopt healthy behaviors. We hope to do two things primarily:

Help the user better understand how they navigate through specific physical indoor environments, by providing context-relevant triggers and timely feedback to them

Gamify how the user might navigate the indoor environment by creating a system that might encourage competition, exploration, interpersonal interaction etc., all in the context of workplace wellness

If it helps to think about this project in the context of a behavior change framework, we hope to improve the quality and contextual relevance of triggers (messages delivered at the right time and the right place) to users, who might be already at a certain minimum threshold of ability (they are already up and moving), and motivation (they might be motivated to compete against themselves or against a social peer group)

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

The system for Project Boundary consists of the following functional blocks:

boundary 2

HOW DOES THE SYSTEM WORK?

It might help to think of this system as a set of lighthouses (the beacons) that help ships (users + their phones) navigate the seas (the physical work environment) in meaningful ways.

THE BEACONS AS A ONE-WAY TRANSMITTER

The beacons are one-way transmitters (essentially simple Bluetooth LE radios) which are continually transmitting a unique ID and, optionally, a static string of data. They are small (the size of a matchbox) and are powered by coin cells, and can last upwards of one to two years before needing to be recharged.

THE PHONE AS A RECEIVER

The user’s phone is the receiver, and it is continually scanning for any beacon signal that it might pick up. Once the phone picks up a beacon signal, it ends up doing two things – it checks the beacon ID against an internal database containing a list of beacon IDs mapped against physical locations, which helps it to recognize the physical location the user has entered. The phone also ends up “ranging” its distance to the Bluetooth beacon by calculating the signal strength of the radio waves. This enables the phone to estimate (albeit very crudely) how close it is to a particular beacon. Ranging might also enable us to infer if the user is approaching the beacon or moving away from it.

POTENTIAL DEMOS

While the gamut of activities that can be considered under the umbrella of corporate wellness is vast, given the limited time frame, project boundary will focus on a narrow sliver of what could eventually be a larger addressable set of needs. For the purposes of this demo, we intend to create a user engagement platform that will help users amplify their existing movement and physical activity as they go about their daily life. A few illustrative examples are described below:

We could look to introduce new behaviors that could seamlessly integrate with the users existing activity such as taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

We could also look to amplify existing behaviors, suggesting they take a longer route to their office.

We could look to increase the frequency or a particular activity, getting users to break a sedentary streak by motivating them to get up and move more frequently. etc.

Consider a very simple demo use case described below:

boundary 1

NOTE: The beacons do not display any information, they only prompt the user’s phone to display a notification, or capture contextual information. Bob checks in to the Humphrey building promptly at 9:00 a.m. Every morning, he passes by the stairs and takes the escalator. What if we were able to remind Bob at the opportune moment that he might consider taking the stairs via a push notification on his phone? We might also be able to confirm if Bob does indeed end up taking the stairs and noting his “score” every time he chooses to take the stairs.

It will be argued that a simple notification might not be sufficient to cause most of us to act, and eventually we might need to worry about “notification fatigue”- but the beacon deployment allows us to consider different approaches toward tracking and motivating healthy behavior.

Once the basic beacon infrastructure is in place, we could try a host of “nudge” techniques – learning intelligently about what a particular user might respond to and tweaking the system to customize how it interacts with the user. Eventually, we hope to layer in some means to enable users to compete — against themselves, or against a peer group — since social influence and support has been shown to have a significant impact on enabling behavior change.

Project Sandbox

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...-in-residence/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/projectsandbox/

Project Sandbox is an experiment in building an engagement with models and instances of care delivery that have shown promise towards helping reduce costs while concurrently improving patient-centric outcomes to the healthcare system. The engagement is undertaken with the intent of catalyzing the healthcare delivery model towards improved sustainability and scalability. Our first project partner under Project Sandbox is the Medical House Call program, a home-based primary care model that is focused on providing care to the frail elderly.

AN OVERVIEW

There are several innovative ideas in care delivery that exist today that have demonstrated the potential of lowering costs within the U.S. healthcare system, while concurrently improving outcomes and patient engagement.

Project Sandbox, which is aligned with the West Health Institute’s mission to pioneer new and smarter technologies, policies and practices, to make high-quality healthcare more accessible at a lower cost to all Americans, is an endeavor to research and analyze the factors that will enable the growth of these innovative care delivery ideas. It seeks to pose and find solutions to the following questions:

  • What headwinds might such models face with regards to sustainability and with regards to scalability?
  • How might we channel the innovation effort towards addressing and overcoming these barriers?
  • How might we catalyze a national movement towards the rapid adoption of these ideas?

The project hopes to engage and work with on the ground providers and pioneers in these instances of care delivery to achieve these goals.

OUR FIRST FOCUS AREA: HOME-BASED PRIMARY CARE OF THE FRAIL ELDERLY.
THE PROBLEM AND UNDERSERVED NEED

There are 3-4 million seniors now living with multiple chronic illnesses such as diabetes, lung and heart disease who are too ill or disabled to easily visit their physician when they need care. These seniors, representing approximately 10% of Medicare beneficiaries, account for two thirds of Medicare’s expenditures.

BARRIERS TO PRIMARY CARE

These seniors are typically unable to access a primary care physician’s office for needed care, and instead end up going to the ER, the most costly site of care. These patients place the largest burden on Medicare, and the number of people with multiple chronic illnesses is projected to grow to 6-8 million by 2025.[1]

Frail elders living in the community face numerous barriers such as mobility limitations, and often have difficulty obtaining primary care and social services. As a result, these elders are at risk of developing acute problems requiring hospitalization and/or institutionalization.

Complex problems of frail elders pose challenges to primary care physicians, as they typically can only spend an average of eight minutes per patient a day.[2]Even if frail elders do seek office care, primary care physicians lack the time needed to deal with multiple complex problems such as dementia, congestive heart failure, diabetes, functional impairment, and end-of-life care.[3]

THE HOUSE CALL MODEL – A POTENTIAL SOLUTION & KEY OUTCOMES

The quickest way to control health costs is by addressing these highest cost patients first. House calls are a solution to the rising costs of helping home-bound patients with multiple chronic conditions. House calls are clinical visits to a patients’  home made by a team of care providers including physicians, nurse practitioners and social workers.

Home-based primary care programs have the potential to significantly save costs for the healthcare system’s most expensive patients by bringing them care in their homes. They provide for care coordination across all care settings. Through this program, providers are also accountable for good care and reduced cost. Overall this could result in significant savings for patients, their families, and the healthcare system.

However, these models, as with all innovation, face several barriers that they need to overcome before they can scale to a point where the impact created is substantial. Through the Sandbox project, we hope to study the factors that might be inhibiting sustainability and scalability of these models, and research innovative solutions to address the same.

[1] http://www.iahnow.com

[2] “For New Doctors, 8 Minutes Per Patient,” Pauline W. Chen, M.D., The New York Times (May 30, 2013)

[3] http://www.iahnow.com/

The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/...-in-residence/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...eck-challenge/

The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge invited developers to create a mobile app that will help consumers take a heart health risk assessment, find places to get their blood pressure and cholesterol checked and use the results to work with their health care professional to develop a plan to improve their heart health as part of the public-private Million Hearts initiative.

The Million Hearts Risk Check Challenge asked developers to create a new consumer app that informs consumers of their general heart risk, motivates them to obtain a more accurate risk assessment by entering their blood pressure and cholesterol values, and directs them to nearby community pharmacies (and other locations) offering affordable and convenient blood pressure and cholesterol screenings.

Participating developers had access to two sources of content that should markedly shape the development of the app:

  1. A new Application Programming Interface (API) for conducting the quick health risk assessment over a consumer-facing interface, hosted by Archimedes and built using their Indigo product.
  2. Locations (and specific descriptors) of places where individuals can go for a lipid and blood pressure screening, made available through flat files from Million HeartsTM and a new API hosted by Surescripts.

The Innovator-in-Residence worked with the Office of the National Coordinator, Surescripts and others to launch and manage the challenge. First place when to the Health Health Mobile app by Marshfield Clinic.  More information, including additional finalists can be found here.

Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR)

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/roar/

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


Recruiting Older Adults into Research (ROAR):
Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

The ROAR project seeks to raise awareness and engagement about research participation among older adults:

  • Starting with Alzheimer’s research, as a common interest with an urgent need
  • Working through the aging services and public health networks – trusted intermediaries who have high touch with older adults and caregivers and may be interested in sharing this information, but need materials
  • Resulting in an expanded pool of older adults who are willing to participate in studies and trials, who will help to accelerate scientific discovery.

Insufficient participant recruitment for research can delay or cause research study cancellation, a substantial waste of resources. The need for Alzheimer’s clinical research study participants is urgent: tens of thousands of volunteers are needed for research studies focused on delaying, treating or preventing this growing public health problem.

Through ROAR, three HHS agencies: The Administration for Community Living (ACL), the National Institutes for Health (NIH), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and their networks of state and community-based health and social service providers collaborated with researchers and private organizations to raise awareness, enhance knowledge and connect gatekeepers and older adults with easy, actionable opportunities for research participation.

The cross-agency team established partnerships with existing government-funded resources and registries such as ResearchMatch, a free, national recruitment registry funded in part by NIH; the Alzheimer’s Prevention Registry; and the Alzheimer’s Assocation’s TrialMatch service. The goal of the ROAR project is to significantly increase older adult enrollment in these registries, allowing for more targeted invitations to enroll in current and future research studies.

The HHS Ignite project resulted in:

  • a robust, flexible, scalable outreach plan which will guide the team’s work together in the months to come;
  • a set of draft materials that have been initially reviewed by stakeholders and are ready for pilot testing;
  • a partnership with ResearchMatch to promote an easy action step for our audience with a unique URL (www.ResearchMatch.org/ROAR) that will allow us to track and measure the success of our efforts, as well as promoting other Alzheimer’s specific registries; and
  • momentum and interest on the part of external organizations to join the ROAR effort.

The materials created, partnership formed and lessons learned from this effort can be expanded to include research for other conditions that impact older adults. This project builds on the success of an HHS Innovates award: Connecting to Combat Alzheimer’s which was a Secretary’s Pick and won the People’s Choice Award.

Team Members

Amy Wiatr-Rodriguez (Project Lead), Administration for Community Living
Jennifer Watson, National Institutes of Health
Nina Silverberg, National Institutes of Health
Jane Tilly, Administration for Community Living
Kate Gordon, Administration for Community Living
Hunter McKay, Administration for Community Living
Angela Deokar, Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Aviva Sufian, Administration on Aging, Administration for Community Living

The National Database for Autism Research

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...tism-research/

Accelerating the pace of scientific discovery requires bringing together data from multiple disciplines, broadening engagement and increasing transparency. To help accelerate the progress in autism spectrum discords research the National Institutes of Health developed the National Database for Autism Research.

Prompted by the need to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research, the National Institutes of Health developed the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR).

NDAR is a data repository and portal to many other research repositories. Using NDAR, a researcher can query data from multiple repositories at the same time. This allows for re-aggregation, re-use, re-analysis, and rigorous comparison of results. Currently, NDAR shares detailed clinical, genomic, imaging and other rich data from 17,000 research subjects. Data from another 45,000 subjects is expected. Compared to only 8% of data which is typically shared by any other major research communities, NDAR is poised to meet the Interagency Autism Strategic Plan goal of making 90% of all autism research data available. Fostering transparency, the NDAR website provides summary information about funded research to scientists and the general public. Pooling data across labs transforms research from a traditional, single-lab, single-project approach to a collaborative approach with unprecedented potential for discoveries.

The technology and policy regimes developed for NADR may be useful beyond the biomedicine and public health fields.  NDAR is a versatile platform that can replicated across many other areas of research. By re-using this technology, millions of dollars in acquisition or development costs could be saved. It is a model program supporting the needs of 21st century science.

TEAM MEMBERS

Michelle Freund, National Institutes of Health
Daniel Hall, National Institutes of Health
Greg Farber, National Institutes of Health
Matthew McAuliffe, National Institutes of Health

Revolutionizing Procurement Through the Web

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...rough-the-web/

The government procurement process can at times be burdensome and littered with inefficiencies. To take this problem head on the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke developed the Purchasing Online Tracking System that streamlines the National Institutes of Health procurement process.

The Purchasing Online Tracking System (POTS), first released by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in 2005 and became the enterprise system in December of 2009, has streamlined the National Institutes of Health (NIH) procurement process.

By offering an intuitive interface and a dedicated support team, POTS did away with the existing time-consuming, error-prone, paper-based procurement process.  Five years later, nearly everyone within the NIH uses POTS for their procurement needs.

A recent integration with the NIH financial system greatly improved the NIH procurement process by enabling the electronic transfer of procurement data from POTS to the financial system.  This enhancement improved staff productivity by eliminating double data entry, reducing staffing and resourcing costs, providing procurement transparency, and saving an estimated over $1 million per year.

Perhaps the system’s greatest benefit, however, is that it reduces employees’ administrative burden, and help them focus more on improving human health through biomedical research and discovery.

The National Health Service Corps Job Center

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...e-jobs-center/

Underserved communities need primary care providers – doctors, nurses, dentists, mental health providers. The National Health Service Corps Jobs Center connects clinicians to health care sites that need them most; increasing access to high quality health care for millions of Americans.

Recruiting primary care providers – doctors, nurses, dentists, and mental health providers – is a costly and time consuming effort, especially for health care sites in underserved areas.  Recruiting one physician to a high need area can take up to two years and cost $60,000. Increasing access to high quality care is an a Department of Health and Human Services priority.

The National Health Service Corps NHSC Jobs Center is an online employment site connecting primary care health professionals to more than 14,000 employers in underserved communities throughout the U.S. and U.S. territories.  Accessible from a personal computer or mobile device, the Jobs Center showcases job openings along with a wealth of information about the health care facility. Google Maps and Google Places technologies are integrated into the Jobs Center allowing users to see the site and nearby places of interest (restaurants, schools), painting a picture of the community.

Since the launch of the Jobs Center on April 30, 2012, the site had more than 126,000 visits and 3,000+ new job opportunities posted.  Health care sites immediately experienced the benefits. Presbyterian Medical Services in New Mexico reported they “…consistently receive 12-15 inquiries from providers per week. Prior to that, we received little to no inquiries.”

TEAM MEMBERS

Rebecca Spitzgo, Health Resources and Services Administration
John White, Health Resources and Services Administration
Prasad Bhalerao, Sapien
Shereef Henien, Sapien
Mark Laurent, Sapien

The NIH 3D Print Exchange

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...rint-exchange/

The NIH 3D Print Exchange is an online, community-driven portal where researchers and educators can download biomedical structure files that can be printed on a desktop 3D printer or through a 3D printing service provider. The site features novel online tools that allow users to convert their own digital 3D models into ready-to-print 3D file formats, eliminating the knowledge gap to allow users of all levels to create high-quality, scientifically accurate 3D prints. Users will also find tutorials on using 3D modeling software, and educational supplements to use 3D prints as hands-on teaching aids.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


The NIH 3D Print Exchange: Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

The NIH 3D Print Exchange is the first government-sponsored website of digital 3D models suitable for 3D printing. The site enables researchers and educators by providing a trusted venue to easily create and discover community-contributed bioscientific and biomedical 3D models that are readily compatible with 3D printers. Users will also find video tutorials to learn how to create their own custom 3D prints. Educators and students from primary school to university level will find classroom supplements to use 3D prints as hand-on teaching aids.

New ways of visualizing scientific data can drive discovery, and at NIH, researchers are saving time and money using innovative 3D prints in the laboratory. But 3D printing technology has only recently become mainstream; digital 3D models are not necessarily “ready-to-print,” and there is a paucity of scientifically relevant and accurate prints available online. Converting a digital model into a 3D-printable format requires specialized software and a complicated workflow that can take over an hour, even for a skilled user. The NIH 3D Print Exchange provides novel, freely available, web-based tools that allow users to generate high-quality, scientific 3D printable models in only minutes, simply by uploading a file or typing in a database accession code.

A project advisory team was assembled of experts and educators who are all at the forefront of 3D modeling and printing for biomedical research, treatment, and education. They provided valuable feedback in monthly group meetings and one-on-one interviews, and tested the site during the closed beta release in January 2014.

The NIH 3D Print Exchange is now under construction in preparation for a public release in April 2014. The NIH Library will feature the 3D Print Exchange in their “Technology Sandbox” that makes 3D printers available to NIH researchers, and a number of other government agencies are interested in reusing our open-source tools and framework. The next steps for our project are to make the website robust and secure, and to continue to cultivate the local, national, and international community of researchers and science enthusiasts eager to use these specialized tools and 3D models.

Team Members

Darrell Hurt (Project Lead), National Institutes for Health
Nick Weber, National Institutes for Health
Meghan Coakley, National Institutes for Health
Jeremy Swan, National Institutes for Health
Erin Fincher, National Institutes for Health
Terry Yoo, National Institutes for Health
David Chen, National Institutes for Health
Vsevelod (Seva) Alekseyev

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Yentram Huyen, Chief, Bioinformatics and Computational Biosciences Branch, Office of Cyber Infrastructure and Computational Biology, Nat’l Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes for Health

The NLM Pillbox: More Efficient Data Cleanup and Outputs

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-ignite/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/pillbox/

The Pillbox team at the National Library of Medicine at NIH and a group of data processing experts created a next-generation system that reduced a labor-intensive multi-week process into an automated process that takes about 1 hour to run. Additionally, the software code that powers this new system is being open-sourced, so developers can more deeply integrate and utilize these pharmaceutical data and images. This effort provides the foundation for a program to address errors in this data that includes government, industry, and developers.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


Pillbox: Watch the 5 minute pitch.

Project Summary

HHS drug labeling information is critical to addressing health challenges such as reduction of medication errors, improving adherence, EHR/PHR development, and supporting emergency personnel. Extending the reach of this data via innovative products and services created by health IT developers is critical in solving these challenges. Pillbox at the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health provides the first free and easy-to-use access to this valuable data set. In addition, Pillbox has led the creation a public-domain image library of over 7,000 high-quality pill images.

Previously, the complex process that creates the Pillbox data set took weeks to perform.  For HHS Ignite, the Pillbox team and a group of data processing experts created a next-generation system that reduced the time-required to around 1 hour. Additionally, the software code that powers this new system is being open-sourced, so developers can more deeply integrate and utilize these pharmaceutical data and images.  Developers can also use this code to access other high value data elements in the drug labels that are not part of Pillbox.

HHS drug labeling data contains numerous errors and inconsistencies, many related to a pill’s physical appearance. By providing access and encouraging non-subject matter experts to build innovative and beneficial clinical and consumer applications and services, Pillbox is obligated to actively address these quality issues. The open source code created through HHS Ignite will be used as the foundation to create an error tracking, notification, and data scoring system, directly engaging with the Food and Drug Administration and pharmaceutical companies, and developers.

Team Members

David Hale (Project Lead), National Institutes of Health
Jennifer Dong, National Institutes of Health
Quynh Nguyen, National Institutes of Health
Ying Sun, National Institutes of Health
Florence Chang, National Institutes of Health

Project Lead’s Approving Supervisor:
Florence Chang, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Additional Information

Pillbox Home Page

The Weight of the Nation Campaign

http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/pathways/hhs-innovates/
http://www.hhs.gov/idealab/innovate/...on-campaign-2/

Obesity is one of the nation’s greatest public health problems, affecting about a third of U.S. adults and nearly 17 percent of children and teens. A unique public-private collaboration led to the creation of a far-reaching multimedia initiative to mobilize personal and community action to curb and prevent obesity.

Obesity is one of the nation’s greatest public health problems, affecting about a third of U.S. adults and nearly 17 percent of children and teens.  Overweight and obesity increase risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and some cancers.  A collaboration among Home Box Office (HBO), the Institute of MedicineNational Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, and Kaiser Permanente, this multi-media innovation reached diverse audiences with scientifically accurate information where they live, work, and play—advancing the Department of Health and Human Services’ mission to protect the health of all Americans.  The films feature the causes and health consequences of obesity and show proven behavioral and environmental changes that can help curb the obesity epidemic.  More than 9 million Americans viewed the films on TV, at events, and online, and hundreds of thousands engaged in dialogue via social media. More than 40,000 community-action kits were created for free distribution.

The Weight of the Nation” is a powerful illustration of how federal agencies can work with each other and with private funders to use innovative approaches to address obesity in the United States. This public-private collaboration spurs action, provides strategic direction, and builds a strong foundation of community outreach to guide efforts to prevent and reduce obesity.

WATCH RELATED VIDEO


 

Our Pathways

At the IDEA Lab, we are about action, in fact, that’s what the “A” in IDEA stands for. We want people to not only understand the innovative and experimentation process, but to actually act on their ideas and experiment. On this page you will find a list of  the six pathways we offer people looking to get involved with the HHS IDEA Lab and IDEA Lab sponsored projects.

SIX PATHWAYS FOR INNOVATION

The HHS IDEA Lab currently offers six pathways for innovation. Each pathway provides different tools and resources for experimentation and problem solving. Some of them run along a defined timeline. Others are ongoing efforts that you can inquire about. We are constantly iterating on these to refine how we meet the needs of the Department and the employees of HHS and beyond.

HHS Innovates

Celebrating HHS Trailblazers. Launched in 2010, HHS Innovates, developed as part of HHS’s Open Government efforts, identifies and celebrates internal innovation by our employees.

HHS Innovates is aimed at building a culture of innovation at the Department through facilitating the exchange of innovative ideas.  This contest recognizes and rewards good ideas but also to help promote them across the Department. To date, HHS employees have submitted nominations of innovations for nearly 500 exciting new staff-driven innovations, and our employees have cast over 60,000 votes during the community-voting phase.

Timeline: HHS Community Voting is currently open.  HHS Employees can vote for their favorite submission here. Public voting will open in late May.

HHS Entrepreneurs

 _________________________________________________________________________________________

Pairing Internal Ideas with External Expertise. Established in 2012, HHS Entrepreneurs was the model for the Presidential Innovation Fellows Program. HHS has worked to attract entrepreneurial talent to create a culture that supports intelligent risk-taking and accelerates innovation. This pathway partners federal staff working on high-risk, high-reward projects with external entrepreneurs for a 12-month fellowship.

The first cohort’s group of six entrepreneurs addressed problems from areas across health care and government ranging from the nation’s organ transplant system to the development of electronic clinical quality measures. These projects resulted in increased efficiencies, cost and time savings, and innovative solutions to pressing problems. Now in its second cohort, this pathway has brought on board a total of 10 entrepreneurs on 9 projects, across six different Operating and Staff Divisions.

Timeline: Applications are now closed and projects are being selected. We will be recruiting external entrepreneurs starting May 5, 2014.

HHS Innovator-In-Residence

Solving Shared Problems Through Partnerships. First established in 2012, the Innovator-in-Residence Program brings new ideas and expertise into HHS programs through collaboration between the Department of Health and Human Services and private sector not-for-profit organizations.

The HHS Innovator-in-Residence is a partnership in which private, not-for-profit organizations sponsor a position to be filled by an individual with an entrepreneurial and innovative background to work on a problem of common interest to HHS and the partner organization. The first HHS Innovator-in- Residence, sponsored by the West Health Institute, helped develop and release the first set of standards for Blue Button data sharing.  There are currently two HHS Innovator-in-Residence partnerships, one with the West Health Institute, focusing on patient engagement, and one with the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, focusing on patient data matching.

HHS Ignite

Incubating New Ideas. HHS Ignite catalyzes early-stage project ideas that can be completed within very compressed time frames. Teams selected into HHS Ignite are guaranteed an appropriate amount of their time to complete the project. By exposing teams to a network of innovators and equipping them with the methodologies and tools used by successful startup companies, HHS Ignite provides a space in which small teams can try something new in a startup environment.

Timeline: Thanks for your submissions, entries are now being reviewed.

HHS Ventures​

Accelerating Proven Concepts. HHS Ventures gives Department employees the opportunity to take their ideas to the next level of implementation. Selected from a pool of previously proven concepts, HHS Ventures gives teams a “Phase II” opportunity to continue development of their data-proven projects for up to 9 months with a budget up to $50,000. Eligibility to apply for HHS Ventures support is limited.

Timeline: Thanks for your submissions, entries are now being reviewed.

HHS Competes​

New Approaches to Problem Solving. HHS Competes is a fresh approach to solving problems, including implementing new methodologies and mechanisms for spurring innovation, helping agencies to advance their core missions, and providing new acquisition methods.  Driven by the America COMPETES Act signed by President Obama in 2011, HHS Competes seeks to make the challenges faced by government and industry transparent by enabling participation from innovators both within and outside of government.

To date, every operating and staff division of HHS has participated in a challenge or competition, resulting in over 100 challenges, 2 million dollars in prizes and the formulation of many novel solutions to address complex problems.

IDEA Lab Sponsored Projects

Each of the above Pathways provides an environment for experimentation resulting in more than 100 projects that tackle some of the most complex problems in health, health care, human services, and government. In addition to the projects supported through these six Pathways, there are ongoing projects that have been identified and sponsored by the HHS IDEA Lab. These projects include:

HHS Connects

Working Towards the Frictionless Exchange of Ideas. HHS Connects links people internal and external to the Department with resources and ideas to increase the likelihood of serendipitous collisions, resource sharing and collaboration on multiple levels.  HHS Connects has a number of platforms to support increased communication and collaboration and none have been more successful than the implementation and adoption of our internal, cross-Department collaboration platform in 2012. To date, there are over 17,000 HHS employees connecting and collaborating virtually across every Operating and Staff Division. In addition to the cross-Department collaboration platform, the Department revised its social media policy to give HHS agencies easier access to tools that will increase public engagement resulting in a more transparent government.

HHS Health Data Initiative

Liberating Data for Health Care Transformation. The Health Data Initiative (HDI) is the movement established in 2010 within HHS operating and staff divisions to make health data openly available, disseminate the data broadly across the health and human services ecosystem, and continuously educate internal and external participants about the value of data.  The mission of the initiative is to improve health, health care, and the delivery of human services by harnessing the power of data and fostering a culture of innovative uses of data in public and private sector institutions, communities, research groups and policy making arenas.

Over the past three years, the default setting for data at HHS has changed from closed to open. This has resulted in the launch of an all new HealthData.gov in 2012, the liberation of over 1,000 data sets to date, and more entrepreneurs solving health care problems than ever before.  In October, the Health Data Initiative released the first-ever open data strategy and execution plan, which details five data-driven goals for the initiative.

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