Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Cover Page: Distribution
    2. Slide 2 Comparisons: LAC and North America
    3. Slide 3 LAC Crude Oil by Period
    4. Slide 4 LAC All Products by Period
    5. Slide 5 2011 LAC Oil Products
    6. Slide 6 Comparisons: Product and Flow by Country
    7. Slide 7 2011 Crude Oil Flows
    8. Slide 8 LAC 2011 Electricity Matrix & Final Consumption
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
    1. IEA
    2. LLNL
    3. Energy Literacy
    4. Sankey Diagrams
    5. Tufte on Sankey Diagrams
  5. Basic Facts About IDB
    1. Figure 1
    2. Figure 2
    3. THE IDB
    4. Figure 3
    5. WHO WE ARE
    6. OUR MEMBERS
    7. HOW WE ARE MANAGED
    8. Figure 4
    9. WHAT WE DO
    10. HOW WE ARE FINANCED
    11. WHERE WE OPERATE
    12. Figure 5
    13. PRIORITY SECTORS
      1. SOCIAL POLICY FOR EQUITY AND PRODUCTIVITY
      2. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMPETITIVENESS AND SOCIAL WELFARE
      3. INSTITUTIONS FOR GROWTH AND SOCIAL WELFARE
    14. Figure 6
    15. PRIORITY SECTORS (CONTINUED)
      1. COMPETITIVE REGIONAL AND GLOBAL INTEGRATION
      2. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, CLIMATE CHANGE, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND FOOD SECURITY
      3. SUPPORT TO THE LESS-DEVELOPED AND SMALLER COUNTRIES
    16. Figure 7
    17. PRIVATE SECTOR PARTNERS
    18. Figure 8
    19. LOOKING FORWARD
    20. Figure 9
    21. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
    22. INTEGRITY
    23. Figure 10
    24. OFFICES
      1. IDB HEADQUARTERS
      2. COUNTRY OFFICES
        1. ARGENTINA
        2. BAHAMAS
        3. BARBADOS
        4. BELIZE
        5. BOLIVIA
        6. BRAZIL
        7. CHILE
        8. COLOMBIA
        9. COSTA RICA
        10. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
        11. ECUADOR
        12. EL SALVADOR
        13. GUATEMALA
        14. GUYANA
        15. HAITI
        16. HONDURAS
        17. JAMAICA
        18. MEXICO
        19. NICARAGUA
        20. PANAMA
        21. PARAGUAY
        22. PERU
        23. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
        24. URUGUAY
        25. VENEZUELA
        26. INSTITUTE FOR THE INTEGRATION OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
        27. OFFICE IN ASIA
        28. OFFICE IN EUROPE
    25. Figure 11
  6. About This Project
    1. Data Compilation, Normalization, and Production
    2. Project coordination
    3. Supported by
    4. Data Visualization
      1. VisArt Group Team
    5. The Website Design and Programming
      1. EBFactory Team
    6. Linked Data Team
  7. Methodology
    1. Overview
    2. Countries Denoted with a *
      1. Bahamas
      2. Barbados
      3. Belize
      4. Guyana
      5. Suriname
    3. Regional Data
    4. Energy Flows
    5. Energy Flows Content 7
    6. Time Series
    7. Institutional Overview
    8. Timeline
    9. Private participation in the market
    10. Linked Data
    11. Terms and Conditions
    12. References
      1. 1
      2. 2
      3. 3
      4. 4
      5. 5
      6. 6
      7. 7
      8. 8
      9. 9
      10. 10
  8. Statistics and Databases
    1. Agrimonitor
    2. DataGov
    3. DataIntal
    4. IDB LAC Energy Database
    5. Geppal
    6. Indigenous Legislation DataBank
    7. INTradeBID
    8. Latin American and Caribbean Macro Watch Data Tool
    9. REVELA
    10. Sociómetro-BID
    11. Working Parents and Childcare Database
  9. Datasets
    1. A Database on Currency Composition of Firm Liabilities in Latin America
    2. Aggregate Indicators on Cost of Credit, Formality, and Institutions
    3. Bank Ownership and performance
    4. Brazilian Electoral Panel Study (BEPS)
    5. Database for Revelation of Expectations in Latin America (REVELA)
    6. ECINF aggregate data
    7. Economic Experiments to Measure Trust and Cooperation among Latin America
    8. Fiscal Resources Dataset
    9. GVAR Dataset
    10. HIDD: Historical IDB Debt Dataset
    11. Informality and Credit Dataset
    12. IPES 2006 - The Politics of Policies
    13. Job Flows Dataset
    14. Latin America and the Caribbean Fiscal Burden Database
    15. Medium-Term Frameworks and the Budgetary Process in Latin America. A Database
    16. OLPC Study Dataset
    17. Political Institutions, State Capabilities, and Public Policy: An International Dataset
    18. Political Institutions, State Capabilities, and Public Policy: An International Dataset (2013 Update)
    19. Political Particularism around the world
    20. Politics, Policies, and Productivity: An International Dataset
    21. Productivity and Factor Accumulation in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Database (2014 update)
    22. Public Debt around the World: A New Dataset of Central Government Debt
    23. RAIS industry level data
    24. Tax Reforms in Latin America in an Era of Democracy. A Database
    25. Trade Integration and Business Cycle Synchronization
  10. NEXT

Data Science for IDB Data

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Cover Page: Distribution
    2. Slide 2 Comparisons: LAC and North America
    3. Slide 3 LAC Crude Oil by Period
    4. Slide 4 LAC All Products by Period
    5. Slide 5 2011 LAC Oil Products
    6. Slide 6 Comparisons: Product and Flow by Country
    7. Slide 7 2011 Crude Oil Flows
    8. Slide 8 LAC 2011 Electricity Matrix & Final Consumption
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
    1. IEA
    2. LLNL
    3. Energy Literacy
    4. Sankey Diagrams
    5. Tufte on Sankey Diagrams
  5. Basic Facts About IDB
    1. Figure 1
    2. Figure 2
    3. THE IDB
    4. Figure 3
    5. WHO WE ARE
    6. OUR MEMBERS
    7. HOW WE ARE MANAGED
    8. Figure 4
    9. WHAT WE DO
    10. HOW WE ARE FINANCED
    11. WHERE WE OPERATE
    12. Figure 5
    13. PRIORITY SECTORS
      1. SOCIAL POLICY FOR EQUITY AND PRODUCTIVITY
      2. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMPETITIVENESS AND SOCIAL WELFARE
      3. INSTITUTIONS FOR GROWTH AND SOCIAL WELFARE
    14. Figure 6
    15. PRIORITY SECTORS (CONTINUED)
      1. COMPETITIVE REGIONAL AND GLOBAL INTEGRATION
      2. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, CLIMATE CHANGE, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND FOOD SECURITY
      3. SUPPORT TO THE LESS-DEVELOPED AND SMALLER COUNTRIES
    16. Figure 7
    17. PRIVATE SECTOR PARTNERS
    18. Figure 8
    19. LOOKING FORWARD
    20. Figure 9
    21. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
    22. INTEGRITY
    23. Figure 10
    24. OFFICES
      1. IDB HEADQUARTERS
      2. COUNTRY OFFICES
        1. ARGENTINA
        2. BAHAMAS
        3. BARBADOS
        4. BELIZE
        5. BOLIVIA
        6. BRAZIL
        7. CHILE
        8. COLOMBIA
        9. COSTA RICA
        10. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
        11. ECUADOR
        12. EL SALVADOR
        13. GUATEMALA
        14. GUYANA
        15. HAITI
        16. HONDURAS
        17. JAMAICA
        18. MEXICO
        19. NICARAGUA
        20. PANAMA
        21. PARAGUAY
        22. PERU
        23. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
        24. URUGUAY
        25. VENEZUELA
        26. INSTITUTE FOR THE INTEGRATION OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
        27. OFFICE IN ASIA
        28. OFFICE IN EUROPE
    25. Figure 11
  6. About This Project
    1. Data Compilation, Normalization, and Production
    2. Project coordination
    3. Supported by
    4. Data Visualization
      1. VisArt Group Team
    5. The Website Design and Programming
      1. EBFactory Team
    6. Linked Data Team
  7. Methodology
    1. Overview
    2. Countries Denoted with a *
      1. Bahamas
      2. Barbados
      3. Belize
      4. Guyana
      5. Suriname
    3. Regional Data
    4. Energy Flows
    5. Energy Flows Content 7
    6. Time Series
    7. Institutional Overview
    8. Timeline
    9. Private participation in the market
    10. Linked Data
    11. Terms and Conditions
    12. References
      1. 1
      2. 2
      3. 3
      4. 4
      5. 5
      6. 6
      7. 7
      8. 8
      9. 9
      10. 10
  8. Statistics and Databases
    1. Agrimonitor
    2. DataGov
    3. DataIntal
    4. IDB LAC Energy Database
    5. Geppal
    6. Indigenous Legislation DataBank
    7. INTradeBID
    8. Latin American and Caribbean Macro Watch Data Tool
    9. REVELA
    10. Sociómetro-BID
    11. Working Parents and Childcare Database
  9. Datasets
    1. A Database on Currency Composition of Firm Liabilities in Latin America
    2. Aggregate Indicators on Cost of Credit, Formality, and Institutions
    3. Bank Ownership and performance
    4. Brazilian Electoral Panel Study (BEPS)
    5. Database for Revelation of Expectations in Latin America (REVELA)
    6. ECINF aggregate data
    7. Economic Experiments to Measure Trust and Cooperation among Latin America
    8. Fiscal Resources Dataset
    9. GVAR Dataset
    10. HIDD: Historical IDB Debt Dataset
    11. Informality and Credit Dataset
    12. IPES 2006 - The Politics of Policies
    13. Job Flows Dataset
    14. Latin America and the Caribbean Fiscal Burden Database
    15. Medium-Term Frameworks and the Budgetary Process in Latin America. A Database
    16. OLPC Study Dataset
    17. Political Institutions, State Capabilities, and Public Policy: An International Dataset
    18. Political Institutions, State Capabilities, and Public Policy: An International Dataset (2013 Update)
    19. Political Particularism around the world
    20. Politics, Policies, and Productivity: An International Dataset
    21. Productivity and Factor Accumulation in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Database (2014 update)
    22. Public Debt around the World: A New Dataset of Central Government Debt
    23. RAIS industry level data
    24. Tax Reforms in Latin America in an Era of Democracy. A Database
    25. Trade Integration and Business Cycle Synchronization
  10. NEXT

  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Cover Page: Distribution
    2. Slide 2 Comparisons: LAC and North America
    3. Slide 3 LAC Crude Oil by Period
    4. Slide 4 LAC All Products by Period
    5. Slide 5 2011 LAC Oil Products
    6. Slide 6 Comparisons: Product and Flow by Country
    7. Slide 7 2011 Crude Oil Flows
    8. Slide 8 LAC 2011 Electricity Matrix & Final Consumption
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
    1. IEA
    2. LLNL
    3. Energy Literacy
    4. Sankey Diagrams
    5. Tufte on Sankey Diagrams
  5. Basic Facts About IDB
    1. Figure 1
    2. Figure 2
    3. THE IDB
    4. Figure 3
    5. WHO WE ARE
    6. OUR MEMBERS
    7. HOW WE ARE MANAGED
    8. Figure 4
    9. WHAT WE DO
    10. HOW WE ARE FINANCED
    11. WHERE WE OPERATE
    12. Figure 5
    13. PRIORITY SECTORS
      1. SOCIAL POLICY FOR EQUITY AND PRODUCTIVITY
      2. INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMPETITIVENESS AND SOCIAL WELFARE
      3. INSTITUTIONS FOR GROWTH AND SOCIAL WELFARE
    14. Figure 6
    15. PRIORITY SECTORS (CONTINUED)
      1. COMPETITIVE REGIONAL AND GLOBAL INTEGRATION
      2. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, CLIMATE CHANGE, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND FOOD SECURITY
      3. SUPPORT TO THE LESS-DEVELOPED AND SMALLER COUNTRIES
    16. Figure 7
    17. PRIVATE SECTOR PARTNERS
    18. Figure 8
    19. LOOKING FORWARD
    20. Figure 9
    21. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
    22. INTEGRITY
    23. Figure 10
    24. OFFICES
      1. IDB HEADQUARTERS
      2. COUNTRY OFFICES
        1. ARGENTINA
        2. BAHAMAS
        3. BARBADOS
        4. BELIZE
        5. BOLIVIA
        6. BRAZIL
        7. CHILE
        8. COLOMBIA
        9. COSTA RICA
        10. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
        11. ECUADOR
        12. EL SALVADOR
        13. GUATEMALA
        14. GUYANA
        15. HAITI
        16. HONDURAS
        17. JAMAICA
        18. MEXICO
        19. NICARAGUA
        20. PANAMA
        21. PARAGUAY
        22. PERU
        23. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
        24. URUGUAY
        25. VENEZUELA
        26. INSTITUTE FOR THE INTEGRATION OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
        27. OFFICE IN ASIA
        28. OFFICE IN EUROPE
    25. Figure 11
  6. About This Project
    1. Data Compilation, Normalization, and Production
    2. Project coordination
    3. Supported by
    4. Data Visualization
      1. VisArt Group Team
    5. The Website Design and Programming
      1. EBFactory Team
    6. Linked Data Team
  7. Methodology
    1. Overview
    2. Countries Denoted with a *
      1. Bahamas
      2. Barbados
      3. Belize
      4. Guyana
      5. Suriname
    3. Regional Data
    4. Energy Flows
    5. Energy Flows Content 7
    6. Time Series
    7. Institutional Overview
    8. Timeline
    9. Private participation in the market
    10. Linked Data
    11. Terms and Conditions
    12. References
      1. 1
      2. 2
      3. 3
      4. 4
      5. 5
      6. 6
      7. 7
      8. 8
      9. 9
      10. 10
  8. Statistics and Databases
    1. Agrimonitor
    2. DataGov
    3. DataIntal
    4. IDB LAC Energy Database
    5. Geppal
    6. Indigenous Legislation DataBank
    7. INTradeBID
    8. Latin American and Caribbean Macro Watch Data Tool
    9. REVELA
    10. Sociómetro-BID
    11. Working Parents and Childcare Database
  9. Datasets
    1. A Database on Currency Composition of Firm Liabilities in Latin America
    2. Aggregate Indicators on Cost of Credit, Formality, and Institutions
    3. Bank Ownership and performance
    4. Brazilian Electoral Panel Study (BEPS)
    5. Database for Revelation of Expectations in Latin America (REVELA)
    6. ECINF aggregate data
    7. Economic Experiments to Measure Trust and Cooperation among Latin America
    8. Fiscal Resources Dataset
    9. GVAR Dataset
    10. HIDD: Historical IDB Debt Dataset
    11. Informality and Credit Dataset
    12. IPES 2006 - The Politics of Policies
    13. Job Flows Dataset
    14. Latin America and the Caribbean Fiscal Burden Database
    15. Medium-Term Frameworks and the Budgetary Process in Latin America. A Database
    16. OLPC Study Dataset
    17. Political Institutions, State Capabilities, and Public Policy: An International Dataset
    18. Political Institutions, State Capabilities, and Public Policy: An International Dataset (2013 Update)
    19. Political Particularism around the world
    20. Politics, Policies, and Productivity: An International Dataset
    21. Productivity and Factor Accumulation in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Database (2014 update)
    22. Public Debt around the World: A New Dataset of Central Government Debt
    23. RAIS industry level data
    24. Tax Reforms in Latin America in an Era of Democracy. A Database
    25. Trade Integration and Business Cycle Synchronization
  10. NEXT

Story

Data Science for IDB Data

Annette Hester, Project Coordinator, Energy Innovation Center, Infrastructure and Environment Sector, presented at our September 22nd Meetup. Annette Hester has developed the Open Data portal for the Inter-American Development Bank. Her portal allows international development users to export numerous categories of data in JSON, RDF, and CSV formats. She is exploring more use cases and opportunities for Linked Data to inform decisions in government and business. She said: 

Thanks for hosting me last night. It was a pleasure to share ideas with such a knowledgeable group.

We would be delighted if you or any in your group took time to understand the database and compare it to traditional graphs and other visualizations. As I mentioned, the easiest way to do so would be using the first data graph, Energy Flows (http://www.iadb.org/eic/databas...­). It is a Sankey Graph with a twist. You can find similar products at:

And if you Google energy flow charts you will find quite a variety. The more I look at energy data and what we have published, the better I feel about our database. I look forward to the results of your investigation. Please do keep in touch… and do feel free to post this note on the meetup website.

There are screen captures of these example below in Research NotesSankey diagrams are a specific type of flow diagram, in which the width of the arrows is shown proportionally to the flow quantity. They are typically used to visualize energy or material or cost transfers between processes. Wikipedia says:

The United States Energy Information Agency (EIA) produces numerous Sankey diagrams annually in the Annual Energy Report which illustrate the production and consumption of various forms of energy. The report for year 2012 include the following diagrams: Energy FlowPetroleum FlowNatural Gas FlowElectricity Flow, and Coal Flow.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) created an interactive Sankey web application that details the flow of energy for the entire earth. Users can select specific countries, points of time back to 1973, and modify the arrangement of various flows within the Sankey diagram.

The US Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore Laboratory maintains a site of Sankey diagrams, including US energy flow and carbon flow.

So I started to build a knowledge base with the context, methodology, and data for the IDB work starting with the Basic Facts About IDB, a PDF document, the About This Project, a popup window, and the Methodology, another PDF document, so these would all be in-line documents for ease of reading, especially on mobile devices.

I found the following references to data:

​​Screen Captures of Flows and Institutional Data

Flows and Institutional Data.png.

Energy Matrix.png

Energy Matrix1.png

Source: IDB calculations based on IEA data and *based on other sources. All figures in kBOE/day​ (thousands of barrels of oil equivalent per day). 

There are 11 parameters for 27 countries and 8 other areas of interest as follows:

  • Parameters
    • Energy Matrix
    • Primary Energy Production Comparison
    • Energy Comparison
    • Primary Energy Balance
    • Secondary Energy Balance
    • Final Consumption by Sector Over Time
    • Final Consumption by Sector and Source
    • Electricity Matrix
    • Institutional Overview
    • Timeline
    • Private Participation in the Market
  • Countries
    • Argentina
    • Bahamas*
    • Barbados*
    • Belize*
    • Bolivia
    • Brazil
    • Chile
    • Columbia
    • Costa Rica
    • Cuba
    • Dominican Republic
    • Ecuador
    • El Salvador
    • Guatemala
    • Guyana*
    • Haiti
    • Honduras
    • Jamaica
    • Mexico
    • Nicaragua
    • Panama
    • Paraguay
    • Peru
    • Suriname*
    • Trinada & Tobago
    • Uruguay
    • Venezuela
  • Other Areas
    • Canada
    • China
    • Europe
    • India
    • LAC
    • North America
    • USA
    • World

I started to build an integrated spreadsheet from the individual country-year spreadsheets. This probably exists as an IDB database, but they have not made that open and available. Some data sets are not available for download (e.g. Energy Comparison LAC).

MORE TO FOLLOW WITH INTERESTING RESULTS FOR EACH SLIDE

Slides

Slide 1 Cover Page: Distribution

IDBEnergyFlows-SpotfireCoverPage-Distribution.png

Slide 2 Comparisons: LAC and North America

IDBEnergyFlows-SpotfireComparisons-LAC and North America.png

Slide 3 LAC Crude Oil by Period

IDBEnergyFlows-SpotfireLACCrudeOilbyPeriod.png

Slide 4 LAC All Products by Period

IDBEnergyFlows-SpotfireLACAllProductsbyPeriod.png

Slide 5 2011 LAC Oil Products

IDBEnergyFlows-Spotfire2011LACOilProducts.png

Slide 6 Comparisons: Product and Flow by Country

IDBEnergyFlows-SpotfireComparisons-ProductandFlowbyCountry.png

Slide 7 2011 Crude Oil Flows

IDBEnergyFlows-Spotfire2011CrudeOilFlows.png

Slide 8 LAC 2011 Electricity Matrix & Final Consumption

IDBEnergyFlows-SpotfireLAC2011ElectricityMatrix&FinalConsumption.png

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Error: Embedded data could not be displayed. Use Google Chrome

Research Notes

IEA

IEAWorldBalance2012Sankey.png

LLNL

EnergyFlowLLNL2013.png

Energy Literacy

EnergyLiteracy2008.png

Sankey Diagrams

SankeyDiagrams.png

Tufte on Sankey Diagrams

TufteonSankeyDiagrams.png

Basic Facts About IDB

Source: http://www.iadb.org/document.cfm?id=38742399 (PDF)

Figure 1IDBBasicFacts2014Figure1.png

 

Figure 2

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure2.png

THE IDB

Since its founding in 1959 the Inter-American Development Bank has striven to find innovative and effective approaches to address Latin America and the Caribbean’s economic, social, institutional, and environmental development challenges. Our work has helped lay a foundation for sustainable development in the region.

Over more than 50 years of activity, the IDB has approved more than $230 billion in loans for projects in key sectors such as infrastructure, energy, water and sanitation, education and health, with an emphasis on poverty reduction.

Looking forward, the IDB will continue to work with stakeholders and partners to deliver financial resources and development thought leadership.

  • The IDB Group includes the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) and the Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF).
  • The IDB is Latin America and the Caribbean’s leading source of development financing.
  • Of its 48 member countries, 26 are borrowing countries from Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • The borrowing member countries control a majority of shares and voting rights in the IDB.
  • Most of the IDB’s lending is based on its Ordinary Capital. The Fund for Special Operations provides resources for the least developed countries. The IDB Grant Facility focuses on Haiti.
  • In 2010 member countries agreed to the largest capital increase in the IDB’s history, which will increase its Ordinary Capital to $171 billion.
  • The IDB has the financial capacity to provide an average of $12 billion a year.
  • Most of the IDB’s loans finance public sector projects, but a significant portion of its resources are directed toward promoting development through the private sector.
  • In 2013 the Bank approved $2.1 billion in loans and credit guarantees for private sector projects.
  • The IIC, which focuses on small and medium-sized businesses, approved $451 million in financing.
  • The MIF, a pioneer in supporting microenterprise, approved grants, loans and investments totaling $108.1 million.​

Figure 3

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure3.png

WHO WE ARE

What do Haiti’s education reform, Venezuela’s Youth Orchestras, a wind-power farm in Mexico and the Panama Canal have in common? They have all received support from the IDB.

The IDB operates like a big cooperative. Backed by contributions from its 48 member countries, the Bank provides credit on advantageous terms and conditions to its clients. To ensure a holistic development approach, the IDB offers a mix of services relevant to the region’s needs, including financial resources, knowledge, and capacity-building products.

For more than five decades the IDB has proven to be an innovative institution and a reliable partner, pioneering efforts to fund social programs that improve living standards and reduce poverty. Current key initiatives include the modernization of infrastructure, the development of alternative energy sources, and investments to achieve universal access to clean water and sanitation.

OUR MEMBERS

The IDB belongs to its 48 member countries, 26 of which are borrowers: Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

The IDB’s non-borrowing members are: Canada, Israel, Japan, the People’s Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, the United States, and 16 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

Each country’s voting power is determined by its contributions to the Ordinary Capital, the IDB’s main source of funding. Unlike most international financial institutions, at the Bank borrowing members have majority voting power on the Board of Executive Directors (50.02 percent of the vote).

HOW WE ARE MANAGED

The IDB’s highest authority is its Board of Governors, made up of representatives from each of the 48 member countries. Most governors are finance ministers or central bank presidents. The Board of Governors holds an annual meeting to approve the Bank’s financial statements and make major policy decisions.

The Board of Executive Directors, composed of 14 individuals representing the 48 member countries, oversees the Bank’s day-to-day operations. Directors approve country and sector strategies, operational policies, and loans. They also set interest rates for Bank loans, authorize borrowings in the capital markets, and approve the institution’s administrative budget.

The IDB president, elected by the Board of Governors for five-year terms, manages the Bank’s operations and administration together with an executive vice president and four vice presidents.

Figure 4

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure4.png

WHAT WE DO

The IDB provides financial and non-financial resources to governments, businesses, and civil society organizations in its 26 borrowing member countries.

The IDB’s financial instruments include loans for public and private sector investment projects, policy reforms, and help in managing financial crisis. The Bank also provides partial credit guarantees as well as grants for technical cooperation and recovery from natural disasters.

Working shoulder to shoulder with borrowing countries and private sector clients, the IDB develops and supports programs and projects in a variety of critical sectors. Its institutional priorities are: social policies for equity and productivity; infrastructure for competitiveness and social welfare; institutions for growth and social welfare; regional competitiveness and global integration; and environmental protection, climate change, renewable energy, and food security.

HOW WE ARE FINANCED

  • ORDINARY CAPITAL: The OC is the source of the majority of the IDB’s lending. At the end of 2013 its callable capital stock stood at $123.8 billion and its paid-in capital stock at $4.9 billon. Retained earnings totaled $17.4 billion.
  • FUND FOR SPECIAL OPERATIONS: FSO resources are used for grants and subsidized loans for the region’s least developed economies. At the end of 2013, the FSO’s assets totaled $10.2 billion.
  • FUNDS IN ADMINISTRATION: the IDB administers numerous trust funds established with donations from member countries. In 2013 it approved $220 million in grants to support project design, sustainability assessments, training, and capacity building in borrowing countries.
  • BORROWINGS: in 2013 the IDB issued S16.2 billion in bonds to fund its lending. Thanks to its triple-A credit rating, the highest available, the IDB can issue debt at low cost and lend resources to its clients at low interest rates.

WHERE WE OPERATE

The IDB is headquartered in Washington, D.C. and has offices in each of its 26 borrowing member countries. These Country Offices play an essential role in the identification and preparation of new projects, as well as in the execution and evaluation of ongoing initiatives.

In addition, the IDB has special offices in Madrid and Tokyo to facilitate working with European and Asian governments, firms and NGOs interested in Latin America and the Caribbean’s development.

While a majority of IDB staff works in Washington, D.C., the Bank is carrying out a decentralization plan aimed at posting more specialists in its country offices to foster closer cooperation with clients and partners. Once the process concludes, approximately half of its staff will be in the region. These reforms will allow for a more agile and effective institution.​

Figure 5

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure5.png

PRIORITY SECTORS

SOCIAL POLICY FOR EQUITY AND PRODUCTIVITY

Latin America and the Caribbean need a new set of social programs aimed at fostering equality of opportunities in order to enhance labor market performance. In particular, they need to build well-articulated safety nets, improve how labor markets function to gain higher productivity and expand social security coverage, raise the quality and relevance of education, promote equality in health outcomes, and tackle cross-cutting gender and diversity issues.

INFRASTRUCTURE FOR COMPETITIVENESS AND SOCIAL WELFARE

To grow sustainably, close the gap with other emerging regions and better integrate into world markets, Latin America and the Caribbean must invest in infrastructure and basic services. Improving transportation infrastructure and expanding access to sustainable energy sources and low-cost telecommunications will contribute to raising the region’s labor and capital productivity, increasing the competitiveness of its firms and benefiting households.

INSTITUTIONS FOR GROWTH AND SOCIAL WELFARE

Countries that have successfully implemented institutional reforms benefit the most from economic reforms. An institutional framework where transparency and accountability are the norm provides for an effective and efficient environment for the decentralized delivery of social services. In addition, an environment with effective regulatory capabilities, socially balanced tax systems, and well-functioning institutions responsible for citizen security has a positive effect on the emergence of a strong private sector, social welfare, and democracy.​

Figure 6

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure6.png

PRIORITY SECTORS (CONTINUED)

COMPETITIVE REGIONAL AND GLOBAL INTEGRATION

Latin America and the Caribbean have made considerable progress at the multilateral, regional, and country levels in terms of trade integration. However, they still need to invest in areas such as administration and harmonization of rules of origin, customs procedures, and sanitary and technical standards. In addition, the IDB will be working on new trade-related issues in services, including technical know-how, financial flows, and investment agreement convergence mechanisms.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, CLIMATE CHANGE, RENEWABLE ENERGY, AND FOOD SECURITY

Building on its ongoing involvement in fostering energy sector investments and in its experience with agricultural development and land tenure, the IDB has strengthened its expertise in the areas of environmental protection, climate change, sustainable energy, and food security. The Bank is helping countries better understand and tackle these phenomena in effective ways. Across all of these areas, it will be crucial to carry out local interventions to protect vulnerable populations from drastic deteriorations in their welfare.

SUPPORT TO THE LESS-DEVELOPED AND SMALLER COUNTRIES

Smaller and less-developed countries require programs that build human, institutional, and physical resources. To meet these objectives, the Bank aims to devote 35 percent of its lending to such borrowers.

In the case of Haiti, after the 2010 earthquake, the IDB cancelled all of its outstanding debt and expanded its grant facility to provide additional funds for reconstruction. The Bank’s operations reflect the priorities of the Haitian government, encompassing agriculture, education, energy, private sector development, transportation, and water and sanitation.​

Figure 7

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure7.png

PRIVATE SECTOR PARTNERS

For the IDB, the private sector plays a fundamental role in achieving inclusive growth. The Bank’s and its affiliates’ financial and non-financial operations involve firms of all sizes, from major corporations to microenterprises.

Through its Structured and Corporate Finance Department, the Bank supports large-scale projects with high development impact in a wide range of sectors, providing up to $400 million in financing per project. The IDB’s Opportunities for the Majority sector finances projects designed to benefit people at the bottom of the region’s socio-economic pyramid.

The Inter-American Investment Corporation (IIC) specializes in financing small and medium-sized enterprises, the region’s main source of employment. The IIC gives priority to countries where SMEs have limited access to credit and capital markets. It also aims to stimulate exports and facilitate access to new technology. The IIC provides direct loans, guarantees, equity investments, lines of credit to local financial intermediaries, and investments in local and regional investment funds.

The Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF) acts as a laboratory to test private sector development strategies. Through grants, loans, investments and knowledge products, the MIF has played a key role in supporting microenterprises and microfinance in Latin America and the Caribbean. It also was a pioneer in researching the economic impact of remittances in the region.​

Figure 8

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure8.png

LOOKING FORWARD

In 2010 the IDB’s Board of Governors agreed to increase the Ordinary Capital by $70 billion to enable the IDB to meet an increased demand for development lending. Coupled with this historic expansion of resources, the Bank has carried out a broad reform agenda.

The Development Effectiveness Framework is the centerpiece for improving how the IDB works. The framework sets forth specific goals to boost efficiency and development impact through 2015. By pairing learning and accountability tools with evaluation-capacity improvements, the Bank aims to meet specific goals, such as more than doubling the number of children benefiting from IDB-backed education projects (from 3.2 million to 8.5 million), and increasing more than tenfold the number of persons receiving basic health packages (from 2 million to 23 million). Progress is reported annually to the public through the Development Effectiveness Overview.

In the areas of accountability and integrity, the Bank has moved forward on a number of fronts. For example, building on the best practices of other multilateral agencies, it adopted a new access to information policy. To ensure that its activities are free of fraud and corruption, it has strengthened the functions of the bodies charged with oversight, investigations and sanctions; approved a new code of conduct for its Board of Executive Directors, and developed plans to support anticorruption and transparency efforts in the region.​

Figure 9

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure9.png

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Every year, IDB loans and technical cooperation grants generate more than 16,000 contracts for the supply of goods, services, and civil works related to development projects in Latin America and the Caribbean. Contracts are open to businesses, organizations, and experts from the IDB member countries.

The IDB does not manage the purchases and contracts derived from the projects it finances. Project implementation and administration are the responsibility of borrowers. However, the IDB does review procurement and contracting to ensure compliance with its policies and procedures.

IDB loans can finance the construction, rehabilitation, expansion or improvement of public office buildings, schools, hospitals, and factories; water and sewerage systems; irrigation systems; power plants and electricity transmission and distribution networks; roads, ports, airports, railways, and bus rapid transit systems.

Consulting services financed with IDB resources include economic, financial, technical, and environmental feasibility studies; project design, monitoring and evaluation; planning, supervision and management of infrastructure projects; legal analysis and audits; training; and document preparation for contracts and bids.

INTEGRITY

The IDB enforces policies and control mechanisms against corruption, fraud and abuses in all the projects it finances, as well as in the activities of its employees, who must abide by the highest standards of integrity.

IDB-financed projects are subject to internal inspections and external audits in order to ensure the appropriate use of resources, and to verify that executing agencies and contractors meet their contractual obligations.

The Office of Institutional Integrity investigates allegations of corruption, fraud, and abuse in projects, as well as cases of misconduct involving IDB employees. The Bank may impose administrative sanctions, such as barring contractors from participating in projects. In cases where laws may have been broken, the IDB can refer information to national authorities.

The Office of Evaluation and Oversight, which reports to the IDB Board of Executive Directors, systematically reviews the Bank’s policies, strategies, programs, instruments, and activities. OVE also evaluates the performance and sustainability of completed projects. Its analysis, conclusions and recommendations are independent from the activities of IDB management.

The Independent Consultation and Investigation Mechanism provides a venue for individuals and communities to express concerns about IDB-funded operations.

Figure 10

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure10.png

OFFICES

IDB HEADQUARTERS

1300 New York Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C., 20577
United States Tel: (202) 623-1000

COUNTRY OFFICES

ARGENTINA

Esmeralda 130, pisos 19 y 20
(Casilla de correo 181, Sucursal 1)
Buenos Aires Tel: 4320-1800

BAHAMAS

IDB House, East Bay Street
(P.O. Box N-3743)
Nassau Tel: 393-7159

BARBADOS

Maple Manor, Hastings
(P.O. Box 402)
Christ Church Tel: 227-8500

BELIZE

1024 Newtown Barracks
101 1st floor
Marina Towers Building
(P.O. Box 1853)
Belize City Tel: 223-3900

BOLIVIA

Edificio “BISA”, piso 5
Avda. 16 de Julio, 1628
(Casilla 5827)
La Paz Tel: 235-1221

BRAZIL

Setor de Embaixadas Norte
Quadra 802 Conjunto F
Lote 39 - Asa Norte
70800-400 Brasília, D.F. Tel: 3317-4200

CHILE

Avenida Pedro de Valdivia 0193, piso 10
(Casilla 16611)
Correo 9 (Providencia)
Santiago Tel: 431-3700

COLOMBIA

Carrera 7, N 71-21
Torre B, piso 19
Edificio Bancafe
Bogotá Tel: 325-7000

COSTA RICA

Edificio Centro Colón, Piso 12
Paseo Colón, entre las calles 38 y 40
San José Tel: 2523-3300

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

Avenida Winston Churchill
esquina Luis F. Thomen
Torre BHD, piso 10
(Apartado postal 1386)
Santo Domingo Tel:562-6400

ECUADOR

Avda. 12 de Octubre 1830 y Cordero
Edificio World Trade Center - Torre II, Piso 9
(Apartado postal 17-07-9041)
Quito Tel: 299-6900

EL SALVADOR

Edificio World Trade Center, piso 4
89 Avda. Norte y Calle El Mirador
San Salvador Tel: 2233-8900

GUATEMALA

3era Avenida 13-78, Zona 10
Torre Citigroup – Nivel 10
(Apartado postal 935)
Guatemala Tel: 2327-4300

GUYANA

High Street, Kingston
(P.O. Box 10867)
Georgetown Tel: 225-7951

HAITI

Bourdon 389
(Boîte postale 1321)
Port-au-Prince Tel: 245-5711

HONDURAS

Colonia Lomas del Guijarro Sur
Primera Calle
Atrás Escuela Hosteleria Los Sauces
Tegucigalpa Tel: 290-3500

JAMAICA

40-46 Knutsford Blvd., 6th floor
(P.O. Box 429)
Kingston 5 Tel: 764-0815

MEXICO

Avda. Paseo de la Reforma 222, piso 11
Colonia Juárez
Delegación Cuauhtémoc
06600 México, D.F. Tel: 5591-386200

NICARAGUA

Edificio BID
Km. 4 ½ Carretera a Masaya
(Apartado postal 2512)
Managua Tel: 267-0831

PANAMA

Avda. Samuel Lewis
Torre HSBC, piso 14
(Apartado postal 0816-02900)
Panamá 5 Tel: 206-0900

PARAGUAY

Calle Quesada 4616 esquina
Legión Civil Extranjera
Asunción Tel: 616-2000

PERU

Dean Valdivia 148-Piso 10
San Isidro, Lima Tel: 215-7800
SURINAME
Peter Bruneslaan 2-4
Paramaribo Tel: 46-2903

TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

19 St. Clair Avenue
(P.O. Box 68)
Port of Spain Tel: 622-8367

URUGUAY

Rincón 640 esquina Bartolomé Mitre
(Casilla de correo 5029)
CP 11000
Montevideo Tel: 915-4330

VENEZUELA

Edificio Centro Federal, Piso 3
Av. Venezuela ,
El Rosal, Caracas 1060 Tel: 951-5533

INSTITUTE FOR THE INTEGRATION OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

Esmeralda 130, piso 16
(C1035ABD)
Buenos Aires Tel: 4323-2350

OFFICE IN ASIA

Fukoku Seimei Building 16-F
2-2-2 Uchisaiwaicho, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-0011, Japan Tel: 3591-0461

OFFICE IN EUROPE

Calle de Bailén 41
Madrid 28005 Tel: 364-6950​

Figure 11

IDBBasicFacts2014Figure11.png

About This Project

Source: http://www.iadb.org/en/topics/energy...&scrolling=yes

Here is our vision for a 21st century database. It presents complex database systems in an interactive, user-friendly, and visually compelling format.

The seeds of this project were planted at a graduate seminar that Dr. Ramón Espinasa, the Energy Information Center (EIC) team leader, taught at Georgetown University. He searched for a method to convey the complexity of energy systems in a systematic, comprehensible, and engaging way. The students’ positive response inspired him to take the idea further to encompass the way energy systems information is aggregated and presented.

Dr. Espinasa proposed this project to the IDB. In 2011, funds were approved to compile and publish energy dossiers that included both quantitative and qualitative data on the IDB’s Latin American and Caribbean member countries. A year later, Annette Hester was brought on board to ensure that this wealth of information would be easily accessible. She spearheaded the effort to transform the contents of the dossiers into a web-based system.

So far, this project has taken three years of concerted effort from a team based in Brazil, Colombia, and the United States. Although much has been accomplished, the work of gathering, analyzing, and producing the quantitative and qualitative data for all our member countries is ongoing. We will be updating these pages as the data becomes available.

The team would like to thank Leandro Alves, the Energy Division Chief from the inception of the Division to December, 2013, for the inspiration and commitment to make the project happen, and Alejandro Melandri, Interim Acting Energy Division Chief, for seeing the project to fruition.

Data Compilation, Normalization, and Production

Ramón Espinasa (team leader)
TJ Conway (energy matrix)
Lenin Balza (energy matrix)
Carlos Sucre (energy matrix)
Jorge Mercado (institutional data)
Carlos Hinestrosa (institutional data)
Sergio Guerra (institutional data)
Martha Gutierrez Forero (institutional organization)

Project coordination

Annette Hester (project coordinator)
Veronica R. Prado (deputy coordinator)
Federica Bizzocchi (communication strategy and visual content)
Javier García Fernandez (communication strategy)
Andres Robles (assistant coordinator)
Alice Driver (translation, editing, and writing)

Supported by

Nevardo Arguello (EXR)
Matias Bendersky (ORP)
Heleno Barbosa (ORP)
Rodrigo Calloni (KNL)
Silvana Cappuzo (ENE)
Alonso Chaverri (LEG)
Paul Constance (EXR)
Juan Carlos Espinoza (vídeo and áudio)
Larry Meek (IT)
Jorge Alberto Mendoza (KNL)
Claudia Oglialoro (GCM)
Norma Estela Palomino (KNL)
Alexandra Pham (IT)
Vanessa Puig (HR)
Maria del Pilar Rodriguez (ENE)
Ana Maria Lopez Quezada (ENE)
Felix Quintero (LEG)
Arturo Zaragoza-Ruiz (LEG)

Data Visualization

The data visualization was conceived and implemented by the VisArt Group, a collaboration between Visuality and Visualization Lab (LabVis) and members of the Computer Graphics Lab, two research teams of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro ( UFRJ).

The Visuality and Visualization Lab (LabVis) of the UFRJ School of Fine Arts is a space for innovation, ideas, and reflections about artistic data visualization, information design, visual studies, and media & visual arts. Data visualization is an emerging field, and the main objective of the lab is to create and produce artistic data visualizations using state of the art technology.

The Computer Graphics Lab (LCG in Portuguese) conducts research and develops projects related to computer graphics, computer vision, computational geometry, image processing, pattern recognition, and visualization. LCG is linked to the graduate Program in Systems and Computer Engineering ( PESC/COPPE ) at the same university.

The Website Design and Programming

EBFactory, a company dedicated to offering high-quality, innovative solutions in software development, carried out the design and programming for the website. The design represents a collaboration with Barbara Castro and Gabriel Lira, graphic designers from the visualization team.

EBFactory Team

Carlos Segura

Linked Data Team

3 Round Stones 

3 Round Stones, based in the Washington DC area, provides commercial product support for a leading data sharing platform called Callimachus. Callimachus Enterprise is a Web server and application development platform for data-driven applications. Callimachus facilitates combining public data from the Web with enterprise content. 3 Round Stones’ clients are leaders in healthcare, business and scientific publishing, and civil government.

The 3 Round Stones project team for the IDB Energy Innovation Center project included Bernadette Hyland, Luke Ruth, and David Wood.

Bernadette Hyland
Luke Ruth
David Wood

Methodology

Source: http://idbdocs.iadb.org/wsdocs/getdo...ocnum=38677633 (PDF)

Overview

This comprehensive Energy Database is a tool to help governments, businesses, academics, and citizens understand the energy landscape in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Database, compiled by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Energy Division, contains two distinct products: Energy Flow and Institutional Frameworks. The first is a quantitative time-series that transforms the International Energy Agency (IEA) World Energy Statistics and Balances 1 into suitable data to create different visualizations. The second is a qualitative dataset that explains the regulatory framework and market organization of selected countries. Together, this Energy Database provides the necessary context for the IDB, our member countries, and the global community to understand the energy sector landscape of individual countries, and how they compare to each other. It is envisioned as a tool to help decision making, project design, and with that, a more sustainable energy future.

Countries Denoted with a *

The IEA does not publish the required data to feed the infographics for the following group of IDB member countries: Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, and Suriname. To ensure that they were included in this database, a team under the leadership of Ramon Espinasa compiled this information from the sources listed below. This is Phase I of a work in progress. The data will be improved when possible and updated as further information becomes available.

Bahamas

The matrix was constructed with data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Organization of American States (OAS), the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) and the Bahamas Environment, Science and Technology Commission (BEST).

Barbados

The matrix was constructed using data from the United Nations Energy Balances.

Belize

The matrix was constructed using data from OLADE; Tillett, Locke and Mencias, “Towards Energy Efficiency, Sustainability and Resilience for Belize in the 21st Century” (report prepared for the Government of Belize); Belize Electricity Limited; and the Central Bank of Belize.

Guyana

The matrix was constructed using data from the United Nations Energy Balances.

Suriname

The matrix was constructed using data from the United Nations Energy Balances.

Regional Data

In order to provide our users with regional context on the energy flow in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), the database includes LAC as a simple grouping of the energy balances for the following IDB borrowing member countries that are included in the IEA published data: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela.

Energy Flows

At this stage 2, this dataset comprises eight visualizations:

1. Energy Matrix
2. Primary Energy Production Comparison
3. Primary and Secondary Energy Comparison
4. Primary Energy Balance over Time
5. Secondary Energy Balance over Time
6. Final Consumption by Sector over Time
7. Final Consumption by Sector and Source.
8. Electricity Matrix

Although each visualization is designed to provide a different insight into a specific country’s energy segment, overall, the information shows the availability of resources, current patterns of supply and demand, and changes over time.

As mentioned earlier, the primary source of information is the IEA World Energy Statistics and Balances. This publication is recognized for its uniformity and reliability, both necessary elements for meaningful comparative analyses. The dataset contains information on the majority of countries in Latin American and the Caribbean 3 including supply, transformation, and consumption of primary energy sources 4 such as coal, oil, gas, biofuels and waste, nuclear energy, and geothermal energy. It also provides data on secondary energy sources 5 such as products derived from crude oil and electricity, including sources of electricity generation. The IEA balances also include information about the consumption of each energy source by sector; namely residential, transportation, commercial, and industrial.

The original source of data is reported in thousands of tons of oil equivalent per year (ktoe). In order to make this information useful to the widest of audiences, the IDB Energy Division transformed the data into thousands of barrels of oil equivalent per day, (kboe/day) 6 which is the unit of measurement used by crude oil—the largest and most traded global source of energy. Given that individuals who work in electricity are used to gigawatt/hour as a measurement unit, the electricity matrix visualization offers the user a choice between seeing the data in either thousands of barrels of oil equivalent per day or in gigawatt hour per year.

Definitions of all energy sources, whether primary or secondary, are common among all visualizations.

Energy Flows Content 7

Biofuels and Waste are comprised of solid biofuels, liquid biofuels, biogases, industrial waste, and municipal waste. Note that for biomass commodities, only the amounts specifically used for energy purposes (a small part of the total) are included in the energy statistics. Therefore, the non-energy use of biomass is not taken into consideration and quantities are null by definition. Data under this heading is often based on small sample surveys or other incomplete information.

Coal and peat includes all coal, both primary (including hard coal and lignite) and derived fuels (including patent fuel, coke oven coke, gas coke, BKB, gas works gas, coke oven gas, blast furnace gas, and oxygen steel furnace gas). Although for the IEA, Peat is also included in this category, the IDB does not include it in this Dataset 8.

Crude oil comprises crude oil, liquid natural gas, refinery feedstocks, and additives, as well as other hydrocarbons (including emulsified oils, synthetic crude oil, mineral oils extracted from bituminous minerals such as oil shale, bituminous sand, etc., and oils from coal liquefaction).

Crude oil is a mineral oil consisting of a mixture of hydrocarbons of natural origin that have associated impurities, such as sulphur. It exists in the liquid phase under normal surface temperatures and pressure, and its physical characteristics (density, viscosity, etc.) are highly variable. It includes field or lease condensates (separator liquids) which are recovered from associated and non-associated gas where it is commingled with the commercial crude oil stream.

Electricity shows final consumption and trade in electricity (which is accounted at the same heat value as electricity in final consumption; i.e. 1 GWh = 0.000086 Mtoe).

Hydro shows the energy content of the electricity produced by hydro power plants. Hydro output excludes output from pumped storage plants.

Natural gas comprises gases occurring in underground deposits, whether liquefied or gaseous, consisting mainly of methane. It includes both “non-associated” gas originating from fields producing only hydrocarbons in gaseous form, and “associated” gas produced in association with crude oil, as well as methane recovered from coal mines (colliery gas) or from coal seams (coal seam gas). Production represents dry marketable production within national boundaries, including offshore production and is measured after purification and extraction of NGL and sulphur. It includes gas consumed by gas processing plants and gas transported by pipelines. Re-injected, vented, or flared gas is excluded.

Nuclear shows the primary heat equivalent of the electricity produced by a nuclear power plant with an average thermal efficiency of 33 percent.

Oil products comprise refinery gas, ethane, LPG, aviation gasoline, motor gasoline, jet fuels, kerosene, gas/diesel oil, fuel oil, naphtha, white spirit, lubricants, bitumen, paraffin waxes, petroleum coke, and other oil products. Oil products are any oil-based products which can be obtained by distillation and are normally used outside the refining industry. Finished products classified as refinery feedstocks are the exception.

Production is the production of primary energy, i.e. hard coal, lignite, peat, crude oil, NGL, natural gas, combustible renewables and waste, nuclear, hydro, geothermal, and solar and the heat from heat pumps that is extracted from the ambient environment. Production is calculated after the removal of impurities (e.g. sulphur from natural gas).

Imports and exports comprise amounts that have crossed national territorial boundaries, regardless of whether or not customs clearance has taken place. Imports and exports of coal comprise the amount of fuel obtained from or supplied to other countries, whether or not there is an economic or customs union between the countries involved. Coal in transit is not included. For electricity, amounts are considered as imported or exported when they have crossed the national territorial boundaries of the country. If electricity is “wheeled” or transited through a country, the amount is shown as both an import and an export.

Heat, Waste, and Losses is defined as energy dissipated due to heat and waste during the process of electricity generation, technical losses in transmission and distribution, losses in the refining process if any, and in the transport of coal. Crude oil losses represent the volume of crude oil reported by petroleum refineries as being lost in their operations. These losses are due to spills, contamination, fires, etc., as opposed to refining processing losses.

Transformation refers to the process by which primary energy sources are transformed by different methods into secondary energy sources.

Total energy consumption is made up of production plus imports, minus exports, minus international marine bunkers plus/minus stock changes. It is also called Total primary energy supply or Gross inland energy consumption and represents the quantity of all energy necessary to satisfy inland consumption.

Industrial sector consists of all facilities and equipment used for producing, processing, or assembling goods. Overall energy use in this sector is largely for process heat and cooling and powering machinery, with lesser amounts used for facility heating, air conditioning, and lighting. Fossil fuels are also used as raw material inputs to manufactured products which includes generators that produce electricity and/or useful thermal output primarily to support industrial activities.

Residential sector consists of private households. Common uses of energy associated with this sector include space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking, and running a variety of other appliances.

Transportation sector consists of all vehicles whose primary purpose is transporting people and/or goods from one physical location to another. Included are automobiles; trucks; buses; motorcycles; trains, subways, and other rail vehicles; aircraft; and ships, barges, and other waterborne vehicles. Vehicles whose primary purpose is not transportation (such as construction cranes and bulldozers, farming vehicles, and warehouse tractors and forklifts) are classified in the sector of their primary use.

Commercial sector refers to consumption of energy by repair and installation of machinery, water collection, treatment and supply, sewerage, waste collection, waste management services, wholesale and retail trade and repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles, Warehousing for transportation, Postal, Accommodation and Food, information and communications, Finance and insurance, real estate, professional, scientific and technical activities, administrative and support activities, public administration, education, human health and social work, arts, entertainment and recreation, other service activities, and extraterritorial organizations.

Other refers to consumption of energy by agriculture/forestry, fishing, non-energy and other non-specified sectors, such as the military.

Own Use refers to the energy used in energy producing industries for heating, lighting, and operation of equipment used in the extraction process, for traction, and for distribution.

Latin America and the Caribbean by Region the IDB classifies its member countries in five different regions. The Andean Group (CAN) includes Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela; the Caribbean Department (CCB) includes Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago; the Central America Department (CID) includes Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Mexico, Panama and the Dominican Republic, the Southern Cone Department (CSC) includes Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay, and the Haiti Country Department.

Time Series

The information is presented for both one year and four year time periods. The data averaged over four year periods provides a look at long-term trends and allows users to see the difference between extreme energy changes that might occur in a particular year and the overall energy trajectory in a country during a longer time period. These four-year periods are: 1971 to 1974, 1984 to 1987, 1999 to 2002, and 2005 to 2008.The period 1971-1974 represents the average of data from the four earliest available years. The second and third periods, 1984 to 1987 and 1999 to 2002 were chosen to coincide with periods of important changes in the crude oil price regime. The period between 2005 and 2008 represents the most recent data available for a four-year period at the time the project began.

Institutional Overview

The institutional information was collected using the most recent 9 sources of information available from the respective countries. In order to define market participation, the IDB relied on multiple sources including reports from public organizations related to the sector, audited financial statements, and/or reports from international agencies. See the information below for specific explanation on the visualization content.

Natural Gas for all market segments, with the exception of Consumption, the information contains the portion of the country’s natural gas produced, treated or processed, transported, distributed and sold to final consumers, imported, and exported by a particular company in the country. The information for Consumption represents the portion of the country’s natural gas consumed by each economic sector. Crude – For Exploration and Production, Imports and Exports, the information contains the portion of the country’s crude oil that is produced, imported, or exported by a particular company.

Oil Derivatives (excluding LPG) for all market segments with the exception of Exploration and Production and Consumption, the information contains the portion of the country’s oil derivatives refined, transported, distributed and sold, imported, and exported by a particular company. The information for Consumption represents the portion of the country’s oil derivatives consumed by each economic sector.

LPG for all market segments with the exception of Exploration and Production and Consumption, the information contains the portion of the country’s LPG refined, transported, distributed and sold, imported, and exported by a particular company. The information for Consumption represents the portion of the country’s LPG consumed by each economic sector.

Public Players are defined as companies that participate in the energy market in which the largest shareholder is the state or a state institution, or in which the state or a state institution maintains managerial control.

Private Players are defined as companies that participate in the energy market in which the largest shareholders are private companies or in which private agents maintain managerial control.

Government Agencies are institutions, organizations, or agencies that form part of the state and participate in the energy market to regulate and/or supervise sector development.

On specific explanation on the visualization content:

Electricity for all market segments, with the exception of Dispatch Coordinator and Consumption, the information contains the portion of the country’s total capacity, transmission lines length, electricity commercialized at the wholesale level, and total connections, by a particular company. The information for Consumption represents the portion of the country’s electricity consumed by each economic sector.

Timeline

The timeline was constructed via a historic review of the Official Gazettes (main legal publication)of each country. In general, the process began by identifying the main current laws in force in each country. Later, the history of reforms that influenced or modified each of the laws was constructed. In the process, relevant historic regulations that had an impact on the energy sector were identified. All laws and regulations (original source) presented as part of each country timeline were extracted directly from official government institutions, regulatory agencies and official gazettes.

Private participation in the market

The graph on private participation in the market was created to respond to the following questions: Is there private participation in any specific activity in the value chain of energy products? It is considered private participation in some activities if: (i) there is effectively a private participant in the activity; or (ii) if some activity that is part of the value chain of a product that does not exist in the country, it responds to the question based on the most current legislation.

Linked Data

The Energy Database is published in both human and machine readable formats. The machine readable portion leverages Linked Data - which is the international data exchange format for publication of data on the World Wide Web. Linked Data is intended for access by both humans and machines. Linked Data uses the RDF family of standards for data interchange and query. The benefit of using the international data exchange standard RDF (Resource Description Framework) is that it may be readily parsed by other computer programs without access to proprietary libraries. Creating and publishing data following Linked Data principles helps search engines and humans to find access and re-use data. Once information is found, computer programs can re-use data without the need for custom scripts to manipulate the content 10.

Terms and Conditions

The use of this Inter-American Development Bank (“IDB”) web site (the “Web Site”) is governed by the terms and conditions set forth http://www.iadb.org/en/terms-and-conditions,1393.html. By using this Web Site you agree to such terms and conditions, as they may be modified by the IDB from time-to-time and posted on this Web Site.

http://www.iadb.org/eic

References

1

IEA World Energy Statistics and Balances, is an annual publication of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)

2

This project is ongoing and variations of existing visualizations as well as additions to the set are expected throughout 2014 and beyond.

3

All figures are obtained from the IEA, which relies on country and regional energy reporting agencies. For Latin American and Caribbean countries, the bulk of the information obtained from national agencies is submitted to the Latin America Energy Organization (OLADE) via an on-going reporting mechanism.

4

Primary energy is used to designate an energy source that is extracted from a stock of natural resources or captured from a flow of resources and that has not undergone any transformation or conversion other than separation and cleaning.

5

Secondary energy refers to any energy that is obtained from a primary energy source employing transformation or conversion process. Oil products and electricity are secondary energy sources because their production requires refining or electric generators.

6

Conversion table can be accessed at http://www.iea.org/stats/unit.asp

7

All energy sources are defined using the IEA definitions.

8

Starting with 2011 edition (IEA), gas works gas is included with coal. In prior years, gas works gas was included with natural gas.

9

As of December 31, 2013

10

This publications is an international peer reviewed glossary published by the W3C (published in June 2013).

The Bank has compiled and organized over 1,000 searchable statistics and indicators for countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, creating a comprehensive dataset for the region.

Agrimonitor

Agrimonitor is the IDB Producer and Consumer Support Estimates country-level database for Latin American and Caribbean countries. It enables policy makers and policy analysts to track agricultural policies and to assess and measure the level and composition of the support to agriculture. The indicators related to magnitudes and composition help to better describe and address the key challenges facing agriculture in the coming decade.

DataGov

DataGov - Governance indicators from key public databases consolidated for all countries in the world.


DataIntal

Trade statistics of countries in the Americas developed by the Institute for the Integration of Latin America (INTAL).

IDB LAC Energy Database

The IDB Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) Energy Visualization Database, produced by the Energy Innovation Center, is an interactive quantitative and qualitative information system on how countries produce and use energy by fuel source and sector. The database also offers a description of the region’s energy sector industrial organizations and institutional frameworks. This tool contains data on the IDB’s 26 borrowing countries (plus Cuba), and for comparison purposes, on other major producing or consuming countries and regions. The information is sourced from, among others, the International Energy Agency as well as gathered by IDB staff.

Geppal

An analysis tool with indicators of women's political participation in Latin America.

Indigenous Legislation DataBank

This databank contains information on indigenous legislation classified by country and by theme for all countries of Latin America.

INTradeBID

  • Market Access
  • Legal Framework
  • Toolkits and Trade Facilitation
  • Statistics and Indicators

Latin American and Caribbean Macro Watch Data Tool

Latin American and Caribbean Macro Watch Data Tool - Over 500 indicators consolidating data on macroeconomics, social issues, trade, capital flows, markets and governance.Updated with information based on national sources available as of September 2014.

See also the Country Indicators Tool for a Summary of Main Macroeconomic indicators by Country.

REVELA

REVELA is a free Web-based monthly service on inflation and growth expectations in Latin America. REVELA’s Web site offers an up-to-date report and a database with historical information. This service compiles data from the expectations surveys of eight Latin American countries with inflation-targeting regimes. Updated with information based on national sources available as of March 2014.

Sociómetro-BID

Sociómetro-BID - A complete dataset of social indicators providing insight into socioeconomic conditions in Latin America.

Working Parents and Childcare Database

The Working Parents and Childcare Database is part of a larger IDB project on childcare alternatives for working families, and how they affect their economic participation. It includes legislation for Latin-American and Caribbean Countries on: childcare, early childhood, early education, financing, children’s rights, family education and support, and maternity legislation.

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