Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 CDC HUS 2013 Web Site
    2. Slide 2 MindTouch Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 3 Excel Spreadsheet
    4. Slide 4 Cover Page
    5. Slide 5 At A Glance
    6. Slide 6 Table 18
    7. Slide 7 Table 100
    8. Slide 8 Data Ecosystem
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Health United States 2013
  6. Cover Page
  7. Inside Cover Page
  8. Organizations
  9. Preface
    1. The 2013 Edition
      1. Chartbook
      2. Trend Tables
      3. Appendixes
      4. Index
    2. Data Considerations
      1. Racial and Ethnic Data
      2. Education and Income Data
      3. Disability Data
      4. Statistical Significance
    3. Accessing Health, United States
    4. Questions?
    5. References
      1. 1
      2. 2
      3. 3
  10. Acknowledgments
  11. List of Chartbook Figures
    1. Mortality
      1. Figure 1. Life expectancy at birth, by selected characteristics: United States, 1980-2010
      2. Figure 2. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates: United States, 2000-2010
      3. Figure 3. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death for all ages, by sex: United States, 2000-2010
      4. Figure 4. Motor vehicle-related death rates among persons aged 15-24, by sex and age: United States, 2000-2010
    2. Natality
      1. Figure 5. Teenage childbearing, by maternal age and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2002-2012
    3. Morbidity
      1. Figure 6. Respondent-reported heart disease prevalence among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012
    4. Disability Measures
      1. Figure 7. Basic actions difficulty and complex activity limitation among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012
    5. Health Risk Factors
      1. Figure 8. Current cigarette smoking among high school seniors and adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 9. Uncontrolled high blood pressure among adults aged 20 and over with hypertension, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
      3. Figure 10. Obesity among children and adolescents, by age: United States, 2003-2004 through 2011-2012
      4. Figure 11. Overweight and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
    6. Prevention
      1. Figure 12. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 and over, by type of vaccination and age: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 13. Vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13-17, by type of vaccine: United States, 2012
    7. Health Insurance
      1. Figure 14. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 18-64, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 15. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 19-25, by type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
    8. Utilization and Access
      1. Figure 16. One or more emergency department visits in the past 12 months, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 17. No usual source of care among children under age 18, by type of coverage: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012
      3. Figure 18. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care or nonreceipt of needed dental care in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012
    9. Personal Health Care Expenditures
      1. Figure 19. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds: United States, 2001-2011
    10. Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
      1. Figure 20. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by number of drugs taken and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      2. Figure 21. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by age and selected drug class: United States, 1988-1994 and 2007-2010
      3. Figure 22. Number of prescription drugs taken in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, 2007-2010
      4. Figure 23. Nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by insurance status and percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012
      5. Figure 24. Age-adjusted death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease for all ages, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1990-2010
      6. Figure 25. Use of prescription antidepressants in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      7. Figure 26. Antibiotics ordered or provided during emergency department, outpatient, and physician visits for cold symptom diagnoses, by age: United States, average annual, 1995-1996 through 2009-2010
      8. Figure 27. Computerized systems for prescription drugs, by provider and system type: United States, 2010
      9. Figure 28. Drug poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics among persons aged 15 and over, by race and Hispanic origin, sex, and age: United States, 1999-2000 through 2009-2010
      10. Figure 29. Retail prescription drug expenditures, annual percent change, and spending by payer: United States, 2001-2011
  12. List of Trend Tables
    1. Health Status and Determinants
      1. Population
        1. Table 1. Resident population, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2012
        2. Table 2. Persons below poverty level, by selected characteristics, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1973-2012
      2. Fertility and Natality
        1. Table 3. Crude birth rates, fertility rates, and birth rates, by age, race, and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1950-2012
        2. Table 4. Teenage childbearing, by age and detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        3. Table 5. Nonmarital childbearing, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother, and maternal age: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        4. Table 6. Low birthweight live births, by detailed race, Hispanic origin, and smoking status of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        5. Table 7. Low birthweight live births, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, 2000-2002, 2003-2005, and 2010-2012
        6. Table 8. Legal abortions, legal abortion rates, and legal abortion ratios: United States and 46 continuous reporting areas, 2001-2010
        7. Table 9. Contraceptive use in the past month among women aged 15-44, by age, race and Hispanic origin, and method of contraception: United States, selected years 1982-2010
        8. Table 10. Breastfeeding among mothers aged 15-44, by year of baby's birth and selected characteristics of mother: United States, average annual 1986-1988 through 2005-2007
      3. Mortality
        1. Table 11. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1983-2010
        2. Table 12. Infant mortality rates, by birthweight: United States, selected years 1983-2010
        3. Table 13. Infant mortality rates, fetal mortality rates, and perinatal mortality rates, by race: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        4. Table 14. Infant mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010
        5. Table 15. Neonatal mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, and state: United States, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010
        6. Table 16. Infant mortality rates and international rankings: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1960-2010
        7. Table 17. Life expectancy at birth and at age 65, by sex: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1980-2011
        8. Table 18. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1900-2010
        9. Table 19. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, Hispanic origin, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1979-1981, 1989-1991, and 2008-2010
        10. Table 20. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        11. Table 21. Years of potential life lost before age 75 for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1980-2010
        12. Table 22. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, 1980 and 2010
        13. Table 23. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by age: United States, 1980 and 2010
        14. Table 24. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, sex, region, and urbanization level: United States, average annual, selected years 1996-1998 through 2008-2010
        15. Table 25. Death rates for all causes, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        16. Table 26. Death rates for diseases of heart, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        17. Table 27. Death rates for cerebrovascular diseases, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        18. Table 28. Death rates for malignant neoplasms, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        19. Table 29. Death rates for malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lung, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        20. Table 30. Death rates for malignant neoplasm of breast among females, by race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        21. Table 31. Death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        22. Table 32. Death rates for drug poisoning and drug poisoning involving opioid analgesics, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1999-2010
        23. Table 33. Death rates for motor vehicle-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        24. Table 34. Death rates for homicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        25. Table 35. Death rates for suicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        26. Table 36. Death rates for firearm-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1970-2010
        27. Table 37. Deaths from selected occupational diseases among persons aged 15 and over: United States, selected years 1980-2010
        28. Table 38. Occupational fatal injuries and rates, by industry, sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1995-2011
      4. Determinants and Measures of Health
        1. Table 39. Selected notifiable disease rates and number of new cases: United States, selected years 1950-2011
        2. Table 40. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses, by year of diagnosis and selected characteristics: United States, 2008-2011
        3. Table 41. Health conditions among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1999 through 2010-2012
        4. Table 42. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for selected cancer sites, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1990-2010
        5. Table 43. Five-year relative cancer survival rates for selected cancer sites, by race and sex: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1975-1977 through 2003-2009
        6. Table 44. Respondent-reported prevalence of heart disease, cancer, and stroke among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        7. Table 45. Number of respondent-reported chronic conditions from 10 selected conditions among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2002-2012
        8. Table 46. Diabetes prevalence and glycemic control among adults aged 20 and over, by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
        9. Table 47. End-stage renal disease patients, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980-2011
        10. Table 48. Severe headache or migraine, low back pain, and neck pain among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        11. Table 49. Disability measures among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        12. Table 50. Vision limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        13. Table 51. Hearing limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2007-2012
        14. Table 52. Respondent-assessed fair-poor health status, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2012
        15. Table 53. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        16. Table 54. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 65 and over, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        17. Table 55. Serious psychological distress in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        18. Table 56. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, and age: United States, selected years 1965-2012
        19. Table 57. Age-adjusted prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults aged 25 and over, by sex, race, and education level: United States, selected years 1974-2012
        20. Table 58. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, age, and education level: United States, average annual, selected years 1990-1992 through 2010-2012
        21. Table 59. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        22. Table 60. Use of selected substances in the past month among persons aged 12 and over, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 2002-2012
        23. Table 61. Use of selected substances in the past 30 days among high school seniors, 10th graders, and 8th graders, by sex and race: United States, selected years 1980-2012
        24. Table 62. Health risk behaviors among students in grades 9-12, by sex, grade level, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1991-2011
        25. Table 63. Heavier drinking and drinking five or more drinks in a day among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        26. Table 64. Selected health conditions and risk factors, by age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2011-2012
        27. Table 65. Hypertension among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
        28. Table 66. Cholesterol among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
        29. Table 67. Mean macronutrient intake among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010
        30. Table 68. Participation in leisure-time aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities that meet the federal 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1998-2012
        31. Table 69. Healthy weight, overweight, and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1960-1962 through 2009-2012
        32. Table 70. Obesity among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1963-1965 through 2009-2012
        33. Table 71. Untreated dental caries, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010
    2. Utilization of Health Resources
      1. Ambulatory Care
        1. Table 72. No usual source of health care among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012
        2. Table 73. No usual source of health care among adults aged 18-64, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012
        3. Table 74. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care, nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs, or nonreceipt of needed dental care during the past 12 months due to cost, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        4. Table 75. Selected measures of access to medical care among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        5. Table 76. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care during the past 12 months due to cost, by state: 25 most populous states and United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        6. Table 77. No health care visits to an office or clinic within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        7. Table 78. Health care visits to doctor offices, emergency departments, and home visits within the past 12 months, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        8. Table 79. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among children aged 19-35 months, by race, Hispanic origin, poverty level, and location of residence in metropolitan statistical area: United States, selected years 1995-2012
        9. Table 80. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among adolescents aged 13-17, by selected characteristics: United States, 2006-2012
        10. Table 81. Influenza vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012
        11. Table 82. Pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012
        12. Table 83. Use of mammography among women aged 40 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        13. Table 84. Use of Pap smears among women aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        14. Table 85. Use of colorectal tests or procedures among adults aged 50-75, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2000-2010
        15. Table 86. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        16. Table 87. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        17. Table 88. Initial injury-related visits to hospital emergency departments, by sex, age, and intent and mechanism of injury: United States, average annual, selected years 2005-2006 through 2010-2011
        18. Table 89. Visits to physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, and hospital emergency departments, by age, sex, and race: United States, selected years 1995-2011
        19. Table 90. Visits to primary care generalist and specialty care physicians, by selected characteristics and type of physician: United States, selected years 1980-2010 
        20. Table 91. Dental visits in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        21. Table 92. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
        22. Table 93. Selected prescription drug classes used in the past 30 days, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      2. Inpatient Care
        1. Table 94. Persons with hospital stays in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        2. Table 95. Discharges, days of care, and average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980 through 2009-2010
        3. Table 96. Discharges in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        4. Table 97. Discharge rate in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        5. Table 98. Average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        6. Table 99. Discharges with at least one procedure in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected procedures: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        7. Table 100. Hospital admissions, average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        8. Table 100. Hospital admissions  average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975–2011
    3. Health Care Resources
      1. Personnel
        1. Table 101. Active physicians and physicians in patient care, by state: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        2. Table 102. Doctors of medicine, by place of medical education and activity: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1975-2011
        3. Table 103. Doctors of medicine in primary care, by specialty: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1949-2011
        4. Table 104. Active dentists, by state: United States, selected years 1993-2011
        5. Table 105. Healthcare employment and wages, by selected occupations: United States, selected years 2001-2012
        6. Table 106. First-year enrollment and graduates of health professions schools, and number of schools, by selected profession: United States, selected academic years 1980-1981 through 2010-2011
      2. Facilities
        1. Table 107. Hospitals, beds, and occupancy rates, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        2. Table 108. Community hospital beds and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011
        3. Table 109. Occupancy rates in community hospitals and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011
        4. Table 110. Nursing homes, beds, residents, and occupancy rates, by state: United States, selected years 1995-2012
        5. Table 111. Medicare-certified providers and suppliers: United States, selected years 1975-2011
    4. Health Care Expenditures and Payors
      1. National Health Expenditures
        1. Table 112. Gross domestic product, national health expenditures, per capita amounts, percent distribution, and average annual percent change: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        2. Table 113. Consumer Price Index and average annual percent change for all items, selected items, and medical care components: United States, selected years 1960-2012
        3. Table 114. National health expenditures, average annual percent change, and percent distribution, by type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        4. Table 115. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds and type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        5. Table 116. Cost of hospital discharges with common hospital operating room procedures in nonfederal community hospitals, by age and selected principal procedure: United States, selected years 2000-2011
        6. Table 117. Expenses for health care and prescribed medicine, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        7. Table 118. Sources of payment for health care, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        8. Table 119. Out-of-pocket health care expenses among persons with medical expenses, by age: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        9. Table 120. Expenditures for health services and supplies and percent distribution, by sponsor: United States, selected years 1987-2011
        10. Table 121. Employers' costs per employee-hour worked for total compensation, wages and salaries, and health insurance, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2013
      2. Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs
        1. Table 122. Private health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        2. Table 123. Private health insurance coverage obtained through the workplace among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        3. Table 124. Medicaid coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        4. Table 125. No health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        5. Table 126. Health insurance coverage of noninstitutionalized Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and over, by type of coverage and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2011
        6. Table 127. Medicare enrollees and expenditures and percent distribution, by Medicare program and type of service: United States and other areas, selected years 1970-2012
        7. Table 128. Medicare enrollees and program payments among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries, by sex and age: United States and other areas, selected years 1994-2012
        8. Table 129. Medicare beneficiaries, by race, Hispanic origin, and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2010
        9. Table 130. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by basis of eligibility, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010
        10. Table 131. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by type of service: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010 
        11. Table 132. Department of Veterans Affairs health care expenditures and use, and persons treated, by selected characteristics: United States, selected fiscal years 1970-2012
      3. State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance
        1. Table 133. Medicare enrollees, enrollees in managed care, payment per enrollee, and short-stay hospital utilization, by state: United States, selected years 1994 and 2012
        2. Table 134. Medicaid beneficiaries, beneficiaries in managed care, and payments per beneficiary, by state: United States, selected fiscal years 2000-2010
        3. Table 135. Persons without health insurance coverage, by state: United States, average annual, 2003-2005 through 2010-2012
  13. At a Glance Table and Highlights
    1. At a Glance Table
    2. Highlights
      1. Life Expectancy and Mortality
      2. Fertility and Natality
      3. Health Risk Factors
        1. Children
        2. Adults
      4. Measures of Health and Disease Prevalence
      5. Health Care Utilization
        1. Use of Health Care Services
        2. Use of Preventive Medical Care Services
      6. Nonreceipt of Needed Medical Care, Prescription Drugs, and Dental Care Due to Cost
      7. Health Care Resources
      8. Health Care Expenditures and Payers
        1. Health Care Expenditures
        2. Health Care Payers
      9. Health Insurance Coverage
  14. Chartbook With Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
    1. Mortality
      1. Life Expectancy at Birth
      2. Infant Mortality
      3. Selected Causes of Death
      4. Motor Vehicle-related Death Rates
    2. Natality
      1. Teenage Childbearing
    3. Morbidity
      1. Heart Disease Prevalence
    4. Disability Measures
      1. Basic Actions Difficulty and Complex Activity Limitation
    5. Health Risk Factors
      1. Current Cigarette Smoking
      2. Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure
      3. Obesity Among Children
      4. Overweight and Obesity Among Adults
    6. Prevention
      1. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination
      2. Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17
    7. Health Insurance
      1. Coverage Among Adults Aged 18–64
      2. Coverage Among Adults Aged 19–25
    8. Utilization and Access
      1. Emergency Department Use
      2. Usual Source of Care Among Children
      3. Delay or Nonreceipt of Medical Care or​ Nonreceipt of Dental Care Due to Cost
    9. Personal Health Care Expenditures
      1. Major Source of Funds
    10. Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
      1. Introduction
      2. Prescription Drug Use
      3. Prescription Drug Use by Drug Class
      4. Polypharmacy
      5. Nonreceipt of Needed Prescription Drugs
      6. Due to Cost
      7. Deaths from HIV Disease
      8. Use of Antidepressants
      9. Antibiotics Prescribed for Colds
      10. Computerized Systems for Prescription Drugs
      11. Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics
      12. Spending on Prescription Drugs
      13. Data Tables for Special Feature
  15. Technical Notes
    1. Data Sources and Comparability
    2. Data Presentation
    3. Statistical Testing
    4. Survey Questions and Coding
    5. References
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  16. Trend Tables
    1. Health Status and Determinants
      1. Population
      2. Fertility and Natality
      3. Mortality
      4. Determinants and Measures of Health
    2. Utilization of Health Resources
      1. Ambulatory Care
      2. Inpatient Care
    3. Health Care Resources
      1. Personnel
      2. Facilities
    4. Health Care Expenditures and Payers
      1. National Health Expenditures
      2. Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs
      3. State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance
  17. Appendixes
    1. Appendix Contents
    2. Appendix I. Data Sources
      1. Introduction
      2. Government Sources
        1. Abortion Surveillance System
          1. Overview
          2. Selected Content
          3. Data Years
          4. Coverage
          5. Issues Affecting Interpretation
          6. Reference
          7. For More Information
        2. Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)
        3. Consumer Price Index (CPI)
        4. Current Population Survey (CPS)
        5. Department of Veterans Affairs National Enrollment and Patient Databases
        6. Employee Benefits Survey—See Appendix I, National Compensation Survey (NCS).
        7. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), Nationwide Inpatient Sample
        8. Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS)
        9. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)
        10. Medicare Administrative Data
        11. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS)
        12. Monitoring the Future (MTF) Study
        13. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)
        14. National Compensation Survey (NCS)
        15. National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA)
        16. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
        17. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
        18. National HIV Surveillance System
        19. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)
        20. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)
        21. National Immunization Survey (NIS)
        22. National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA)
        23. National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES)—See Appendix I, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).
        24. National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS)
        25. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)
        26. National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF)
        27. National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH)
        28. National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
          1. Birth File
          2. Fetal Death Data Set
          3. Mortality File
          4. Multiple Cause-of-Death File
          5. Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set
          6. Compressed Mortality File (CMF)
        29. Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)
        30. Population Census and Population Estimates
          1. Decennial Census
          2. Race Data on the 1990 Census
          3. Race Data on the 2000 Census
          4. Race Data on the 2010 Census
          5. Modified Decennial Census Files
          6. Postcensal Population Estimates
          7. Intercensal Population Estimates
          8. Bridged-race Population Estimates
        31. Quality Improvement Evaluation System (QIES)
        32. Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Surveillance
        33. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)
        34. United States Renal Data System (USRDS)
        35. Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)
      3. Private and Global Sources
        1. American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM)
        2. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)
        3. American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM)
        4. American Dental Association (ADA)
        5. American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals
        6. American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile
        7. American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
        8. Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)
        9. Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO)
        10. Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH)
        11. Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Census
        12. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Data
    3. Appendix II. Definitions and Methods
      1. Introduction
      2. Appendix II: Listing of Terms
        1. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)
        2. Active physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        3. Activities of daily living (ADL)
        4. Admission
        5. Age
        6. Age adjustment
        7. AIDS—See Appendix II, Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
        8. Alcohol consumption
        9. Any-listed diagnosis—See Appendix II, Diagnosis.
        10. Average annual rate of change (percent change)
        11. Average length of stay
        12. Basic actions difficulty
        13. Bed, health facility
        14. Binge drinking
        15. Birth cohort
        16. Birth rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
        17. Birthweight
        18. Blood pressure, high
        19. Body mass index (BMI)
        20. Cause of death
        21. Cause-of-death ranking
        22. Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
        23. Cholesterol
        24. Cigarette smoking
        25. Civilian noninstitutionalized population; Civilian population—See Appendix II, Population.
        26. Colorectal tests or procedures
        27. Community hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        28. Comparability ratio
        29. Compensation—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
        30. Complex activity limitation
        31. Consumer Price Index (CPI)
        32. Contraception
        33. Cost-charge ratio
        34. Critical access hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        35. Crude birth rate; Crude death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates; Rate: Death and related rates.
        36. Days of care
        37. Death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
        38. Dental caries
        39. Dental visit
        40. Diabetes
        41. Diagnosis
        42. Diagnostic and other nonsurgical procedure—See Appendix II, Procedure.
        43. Discharge
        44. Domiciliary care home—See Appendix II, Long-term care facility; Nursing home.
        45. Drug
        46. Drug abuse—See Appendix II, Illicit drug use.
        47. Education
        48. Emergency department
        49. Emergency department or emergency room visit
        50. Employer costs for employee compensation
        51. End-stage renal disease (ESRD)
        52. Ethnicity—See Appendix II, Hispanic origin.
        53. Exercise—See Appendix II, Physical activity, leisure-time.
        54. Expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national. [Also see Appendix I, National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA).]
        55. External cause of injury
        56. Family income
        57. Federal hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        58. Fee-for-service health insurance
        59. Fertility rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
        60. General hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        61. Geographic region
          1. Figure I. U.S. Census Bureau: Four geographic regions and nine divisions of the United States
        62. Gestation
        63. Gross domestic product (GDP)
        64. Health care contact
        65. Health expenditures, national
        66. Health insurance coverage
        67. Health maintenance organization (HMO)
        68. Health services and supplies expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        69. Health status, respondent-assessed
        70. Hearing trouble
        71. Hispanic origin
        72. HIV—See Appendix II, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.
        73. Home visit
        74. Hospital
        75. Hospital-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        76. Hospital day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
        77. Hospital utilization
        78. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease
        79. Hypertension—See Appendix II, Blood pressure, high.
        80. ICD; ICD codes—See Appendix II, Cause of death; International Classification of Diseases (ICD).
        81. Illicit drug use
        82. Immunization—See Appendix II, Vaccination.
        83. Incidence
        84. Income—See Appendix II, Family income.
        85. Individual practice association (IPA)—See Appendix II, Health maintenance organization (HMO).
        86. Industry of employment
        87. Infant death
        88. Injury
        89. Injury-related visit
        90. Inpatient
        91. Inpatient care—See Appendix II, Hospital utilization.
        92. Inpatient day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
        93. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)
        94. Insurance—See Appendix II, Health insurance coverage.
        95. Intermediate care facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        96. International Classification of Diseases (ICD)
        97. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision,  Clinical Modification (ICD–9–CM)
        98. International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision,  Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System  (ICD–10–CM/PCS)
        99. Late fetal death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
        100. Leading causes of death—See Appendix II, Cause-of-death ranking.
        101. Length of stay—See Appendix II, Average length of stay.
        102. Life expectancy
        103. Limitation of activity
        104. Long-term care facility
        105. Low birthweight—See Appendix II, Birthweight.
        106. Mammography
        107. Managed care
        108. Marital status
        109. Maternal age—See Appendix II, Age.
        110. Maternal education—See Appendix II, Education.
        111. Medicaid
        112. Medicaid payments
        113. Medical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        114. Medicare
        115. Metropolitan statistical area (MSA)
        116. Micropolitan statistical area
        117. Multum Lexicon Plus therapeutic class
        118. Neonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II, Rate:  Death and related rates.
        119. Nonprofit hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        120. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)—See Appendix II, Industry of employment.
        121. Notifiable disease
        122. Nursing home
        123. Nursing home expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        124. Obesity—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
        125. Occupancy rate
        126. Office-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        127. Office visit
        128. Operation—See Appendix II, Procedure.
        129. Outpatient department
        130. Outpatient surgery
        131. Outpatient visit
        132. Overweight—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
        133. Pap smear
        134. Patient—See Appendix II, Inpatient; Office visit; Outpatient visit.
        135. Percent change/percentage change—See Appendix II, Average annual rate of change (percent change).
        136. Perinatal mortality rate; ratio—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
        137. Personal care home with or without nursing—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        138. Personal health care expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        139. Physical activity, leisure-time
        140. Physician
        141. Physician specialty
        142. Population
        143. Postneonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
        144. Poverty
        145. Preferred provider organization (PPO)
        146. Prenatal care
        147. Prevalence
        148. Primary care specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        149. Private expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        150. Procedure
        151. Proprietary hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        152. Public expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        153. Purchasing power parities (PPPs)
        154. Race
        155. Rate
        156. Region—See Appendix II, Geographic region.
        157. Registered hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        158. Registration area
        159. Relative standard error (RSE)
        160. Relative survival rate
        161. Reporting area
        162. Resident, health facility
        163. Resident population—See Appendix II, Population.
        164. Rural—See Appendix II, Urbanization.
        165. Self-assessment of health—See Appendix II, Health status, respondent-assessed.
        166. Serious psychological distress
        167. Short-stay hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        168. Skilled nursing facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        169. Smoker—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
        170. Special hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        171. Substance use
        172. Suicidal ideation
        173. Surgery—See Appendix II, Outpatient surgery; Procedure.
        174. Surgical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        175. Tobacco use—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
        176. Uninsured
        177. Urbanization
        178. Usual source of care
        179. Vaccination
        180. Wages and salaries—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
        181. Years of potential life lost (YPLL)
  18. Index
    1. Index
      1. A
  19. Back Cover Page

Data Science for Health United States 2013

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 CDC HUS 2013 Web Site
    2. Slide 2 MindTouch Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 3 Excel Spreadsheet
    4. Slide 4 Cover Page
    5. Slide 5 At A Glance
    6. Slide 6 Table 18
    7. Slide 7 Table 100
    8. Slide 8 Data Ecosystem
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Health United States 2013
  6. Cover Page
  7. Inside Cover Page
  8. Organizations
  9. Preface
    1. The 2013 Edition
      1. Chartbook
      2. Trend Tables
      3. Appendixes
      4. Index
    2. Data Considerations
      1. Racial and Ethnic Data
      2. Education and Income Data
      3. Disability Data
      4. Statistical Significance
    3. Accessing Health, United States
    4. Questions?
    5. References
      1. 1
      2. 2
      3. 3
  10. Acknowledgments
  11. List of Chartbook Figures
    1. Mortality
      1. Figure 1. Life expectancy at birth, by selected characteristics: United States, 1980-2010
      2. Figure 2. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates: United States, 2000-2010
      3. Figure 3. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death for all ages, by sex: United States, 2000-2010
      4. Figure 4. Motor vehicle-related death rates among persons aged 15-24, by sex and age: United States, 2000-2010
    2. Natality
      1. Figure 5. Teenage childbearing, by maternal age and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2002-2012
    3. Morbidity
      1. Figure 6. Respondent-reported heart disease prevalence among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012
    4. Disability Measures
      1. Figure 7. Basic actions difficulty and complex activity limitation among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012
    5. Health Risk Factors
      1. Figure 8. Current cigarette smoking among high school seniors and adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 9. Uncontrolled high blood pressure among adults aged 20 and over with hypertension, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
      3. Figure 10. Obesity among children and adolescents, by age: United States, 2003-2004 through 2011-2012
      4. Figure 11. Overweight and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
    6. Prevention
      1. Figure 12. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 and over, by type of vaccination and age: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 13. Vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13-17, by type of vaccine: United States, 2012
    7. Health Insurance
      1. Figure 14. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 18-64, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 15. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 19-25, by type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
    8. Utilization and Access
      1. Figure 16. One or more emergency department visits in the past 12 months, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 17. No usual source of care among children under age 18, by type of coverage: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012
      3. Figure 18. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care or nonreceipt of needed dental care in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012
    9. Personal Health Care Expenditures
      1. Figure 19. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds: United States, 2001-2011
    10. Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
      1. Figure 20. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by number of drugs taken and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      2. Figure 21. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by age and selected drug class: United States, 1988-1994 and 2007-2010
      3. Figure 22. Number of prescription drugs taken in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, 2007-2010
      4. Figure 23. Nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by insurance status and percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012
      5. Figure 24. Age-adjusted death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease for all ages, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1990-2010
      6. Figure 25. Use of prescription antidepressants in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      7. Figure 26. Antibiotics ordered or provided during emergency department, outpatient, and physician visits for cold symptom diagnoses, by age: United States, average annual, 1995-1996 through 2009-2010
      8. Figure 27. Computerized systems for prescription drugs, by provider and system type: United States, 2010
      9. Figure 28. Drug poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics among persons aged 15 and over, by race and Hispanic origin, sex, and age: United States, 1999-2000 through 2009-2010
      10. Figure 29. Retail prescription drug expenditures, annual percent change, and spending by payer: United States, 2001-2011
  12. List of Trend Tables
    1. Health Status and Determinants
      1. Population
        1. Table 1. Resident population, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2012
        2. Table 2. Persons below poverty level, by selected characteristics, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1973-2012
      2. Fertility and Natality
        1. Table 3. Crude birth rates, fertility rates, and birth rates, by age, race, and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1950-2012
        2. Table 4. Teenage childbearing, by age and detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        3. Table 5. Nonmarital childbearing, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother, and maternal age: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        4. Table 6. Low birthweight live births, by detailed race, Hispanic origin, and smoking status of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        5. Table 7. Low birthweight live births, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, 2000-2002, 2003-2005, and 2010-2012
        6. Table 8. Legal abortions, legal abortion rates, and legal abortion ratios: United States and 46 continuous reporting areas, 2001-2010
        7. Table 9. Contraceptive use in the past month among women aged 15-44, by age, race and Hispanic origin, and method of contraception: United States, selected years 1982-2010
        8. Table 10. Breastfeeding among mothers aged 15-44, by year of baby's birth and selected characteristics of mother: United States, average annual 1986-1988 through 2005-2007
      3. Mortality
        1. Table 11. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1983-2010
        2. Table 12. Infant mortality rates, by birthweight: United States, selected years 1983-2010
        3. Table 13. Infant mortality rates, fetal mortality rates, and perinatal mortality rates, by race: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        4. Table 14. Infant mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010
        5. Table 15. Neonatal mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, and state: United States, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010
        6. Table 16. Infant mortality rates and international rankings: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1960-2010
        7. Table 17. Life expectancy at birth and at age 65, by sex: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1980-2011
        8. Table 18. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1900-2010
        9. Table 19. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, Hispanic origin, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1979-1981, 1989-1991, and 2008-2010
        10. Table 20. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        11. Table 21. Years of potential life lost before age 75 for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1980-2010
        12. Table 22. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, 1980 and 2010
        13. Table 23. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by age: United States, 1980 and 2010
        14. Table 24. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, sex, region, and urbanization level: United States, average annual, selected years 1996-1998 through 2008-2010
        15. Table 25. Death rates for all causes, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        16. Table 26. Death rates for diseases of heart, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        17. Table 27. Death rates for cerebrovascular diseases, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        18. Table 28. Death rates for malignant neoplasms, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        19. Table 29. Death rates for malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lung, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        20. Table 30. Death rates for malignant neoplasm of breast among females, by race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        21. Table 31. Death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        22. Table 32. Death rates for drug poisoning and drug poisoning involving opioid analgesics, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1999-2010
        23. Table 33. Death rates for motor vehicle-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        24. Table 34. Death rates for homicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        25. Table 35. Death rates for suicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        26. Table 36. Death rates for firearm-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1970-2010
        27. Table 37. Deaths from selected occupational diseases among persons aged 15 and over: United States, selected years 1980-2010
        28. Table 38. Occupational fatal injuries and rates, by industry, sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1995-2011
      4. Determinants and Measures of Health
        1. Table 39. Selected notifiable disease rates and number of new cases: United States, selected years 1950-2011
        2. Table 40. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses, by year of diagnosis and selected characteristics: United States, 2008-2011
        3. Table 41. Health conditions among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1999 through 2010-2012
        4. Table 42. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for selected cancer sites, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1990-2010
        5. Table 43. Five-year relative cancer survival rates for selected cancer sites, by race and sex: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1975-1977 through 2003-2009
        6. Table 44. Respondent-reported prevalence of heart disease, cancer, and stroke among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        7. Table 45. Number of respondent-reported chronic conditions from 10 selected conditions among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2002-2012
        8. Table 46. Diabetes prevalence and glycemic control among adults aged 20 and over, by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
        9. Table 47. End-stage renal disease patients, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980-2011
        10. Table 48. Severe headache or migraine, low back pain, and neck pain among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        11. Table 49. Disability measures among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        12. Table 50. Vision limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        13. Table 51. Hearing limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2007-2012
        14. Table 52. Respondent-assessed fair-poor health status, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2012
        15. Table 53. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        16. Table 54. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 65 and over, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        17. Table 55. Serious psychological distress in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        18. Table 56. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, and age: United States, selected years 1965-2012
        19. Table 57. Age-adjusted prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults aged 25 and over, by sex, race, and education level: United States, selected years 1974-2012
        20. Table 58. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, age, and education level: United States, average annual, selected years 1990-1992 through 2010-2012
        21. Table 59. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        22. Table 60. Use of selected substances in the past month among persons aged 12 and over, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 2002-2012
        23. Table 61. Use of selected substances in the past 30 days among high school seniors, 10th graders, and 8th graders, by sex and race: United States, selected years 1980-2012
        24. Table 62. Health risk behaviors among students in grades 9-12, by sex, grade level, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1991-2011
        25. Table 63. Heavier drinking and drinking five or more drinks in a day among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        26. Table 64. Selected health conditions and risk factors, by age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2011-2012
        27. Table 65. Hypertension among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
        28. Table 66. Cholesterol among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
        29. Table 67. Mean macronutrient intake among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010
        30. Table 68. Participation in leisure-time aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities that meet the federal 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1998-2012
        31. Table 69. Healthy weight, overweight, and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1960-1962 through 2009-2012
        32. Table 70. Obesity among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1963-1965 through 2009-2012
        33. Table 71. Untreated dental caries, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010
    2. Utilization of Health Resources
      1. Ambulatory Care
        1. Table 72. No usual source of health care among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012
        2. Table 73. No usual source of health care among adults aged 18-64, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012
        3. Table 74. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care, nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs, or nonreceipt of needed dental care during the past 12 months due to cost, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        4. Table 75. Selected measures of access to medical care among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        5. Table 76. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care during the past 12 months due to cost, by state: 25 most populous states and United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        6. Table 77. No health care visits to an office or clinic within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        7. Table 78. Health care visits to doctor offices, emergency departments, and home visits within the past 12 months, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        8. Table 79. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among children aged 19-35 months, by race, Hispanic origin, poverty level, and location of residence in metropolitan statistical area: United States, selected years 1995-2012
        9. Table 80. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among adolescents aged 13-17, by selected characteristics: United States, 2006-2012
        10. Table 81. Influenza vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012
        11. Table 82. Pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012
        12. Table 83. Use of mammography among women aged 40 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        13. Table 84. Use of Pap smears among women aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        14. Table 85. Use of colorectal tests or procedures among adults aged 50-75, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2000-2010
        15. Table 86. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        16. Table 87. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        17. Table 88. Initial injury-related visits to hospital emergency departments, by sex, age, and intent and mechanism of injury: United States, average annual, selected years 2005-2006 through 2010-2011
        18. Table 89. Visits to physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, and hospital emergency departments, by age, sex, and race: United States, selected years 1995-2011
        19. Table 90. Visits to primary care generalist and specialty care physicians, by selected characteristics and type of physician: United States, selected years 1980-2010 
        20. Table 91. Dental visits in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        21. Table 92. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
        22. Table 93. Selected prescription drug classes used in the past 30 days, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      2. Inpatient Care
        1. Table 94. Persons with hospital stays in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        2. Table 95. Discharges, days of care, and average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980 through 2009-2010
        3. Table 96. Discharges in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        4. Table 97. Discharge rate in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        5. Table 98. Average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        6. Table 99. Discharges with at least one procedure in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected procedures: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        7. Table 100. Hospital admissions, average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        8. Table 100. Hospital admissions  average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975–2011
    3. Health Care Resources
      1. Personnel
        1. Table 101. Active physicians and physicians in patient care, by state: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        2. Table 102. Doctors of medicine, by place of medical education and activity: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1975-2011
        3. Table 103. Doctors of medicine in primary care, by specialty: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1949-2011
        4. Table 104. Active dentists, by state: United States, selected years 1993-2011
        5. Table 105. Healthcare employment and wages, by selected occupations: United States, selected years 2001-2012
        6. Table 106. First-year enrollment and graduates of health professions schools, and number of schools, by selected profession: United States, selected academic years 1980-1981 through 2010-2011
      2. Facilities
        1. Table 107. Hospitals, beds, and occupancy rates, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        2. Table 108. Community hospital beds and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011
        3. Table 109. Occupancy rates in community hospitals and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011
        4. Table 110. Nursing homes, beds, residents, and occupancy rates, by state: United States, selected years 1995-2012
        5. Table 111. Medicare-certified providers and suppliers: United States, selected years 1975-2011
    4. Health Care Expenditures and Payors
      1. National Health Expenditures
        1. Table 112. Gross domestic product, national health expenditures, per capita amounts, percent distribution, and average annual percent change: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        2. Table 113. Consumer Price Index and average annual percent change for all items, selected items, and medical care components: United States, selected years 1960-2012
        3. Table 114. National health expenditures, average annual percent change, and percent distribution, by type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        4. Table 115. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds and type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        5. Table 116. Cost of hospital discharges with common hospital operating room procedures in nonfederal community hospitals, by age and selected principal procedure: United States, selected years 2000-2011
        6. Table 117. Expenses for health care and prescribed medicine, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        7. Table 118. Sources of payment for health care, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        8. Table 119. Out-of-pocket health care expenses among persons with medical expenses, by age: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        9. Table 120. Expenditures for health services and supplies and percent distribution, by sponsor: United States, selected years 1987-2011
        10. Table 121. Employers' costs per employee-hour worked for total compensation, wages and salaries, and health insurance, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2013
      2. Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs
        1. Table 122. Private health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        2. Table 123. Private health insurance coverage obtained through the workplace among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        3. Table 124. Medicaid coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        4. Table 125. No health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        5. Table 126. Health insurance coverage of noninstitutionalized Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and over, by type of coverage and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2011
        6. Table 127. Medicare enrollees and expenditures and percent distribution, by Medicare program and type of service: United States and other areas, selected years 1970-2012
        7. Table 128. Medicare enrollees and program payments among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries, by sex and age: United States and other areas, selected years 1994-2012
        8. Table 129. Medicare beneficiaries, by race, Hispanic origin, and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2010
        9. Table 130. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by basis of eligibility, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010
        10. Table 131. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by type of service: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010 
        11. Table 132. Department of Veterans Affairs health care expenditures and use, and persons treated, by selected characteristics: United States, selected fiscal years 1970-2012
      3. State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance
        1. Table 133. Medicare enrollees, enrollees in managed care, payment per enrollee, and short-stay hospital utilization, by state: United States, selected years 1994 and 2012
        2. Table 134. Medicaid beneficiaries, beneficiaries in managed care, and payments per beneficiary, by state: United States, selected fiscal years 2000-2010
        3. Table 135. Persons without health insurance coverage, by state: United States, average annual, 2003-2005 through 2010-2012
  13. At a Glance Table and Highlights
    1. At a Glance Table
    2. Highlights
      1. Life Expectancy and Mortality
      2. Fertility and Natality
      3. Health Risk Factors
        1. Children
        2. Adults
      4. Measures of Health and Disease Prevalence
      5. Health Care Utilization
        1. Use of Health Care Services
        2. Use of Preventive Medical Care Services
      6. Nonreceipt of Needed Medical Care, Prescription Drugs, and Dental Care Due to Cost
      7. Health Care Resources
      8. Health Care Expenditures and Payers
        1. Health Care Expenditures
        2. Health Care Payers
      9. Health Insurance Coverage
  14. Chartbook With Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
    1. Mortality
      1. Life Expectancy at Birth
      2. Infant Mortality
      3. Selected Causes of Death
      4. Motor Vehicle-related Death Rates
    2. Natality
      1. Teenage Childbearing
    3. Morbidity
      1. Heart Disease Prevalence
    4. Disability Measures
      1. Basic Actions Difficulty and Complex Activity Limitation
    5. Health Risk Factors
      1. Current Cigarette Smoking
      2. Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure
      3. Obesity Among Children
      4. Overweight and Obesity Among Adults
    6. Prevention
      1. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination
      2. Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17
    7. Health Insurance
      1. Coverage Among Adults Aged 18–64
      2. Coverage Among Adults Aged 19–25
    8. Utilization and Access
      1. Emergency Department Use
      2. Usual Source of Care Among Children
      3. Delay or Nonreceipt of Medical Care or​ Nonreceipt of Dental Care Due to Cost
    9. Personal Health Care Expenditures
      1. Major Source of Funds
    10. Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
      1. Introduction
      2. Prescription Drug Use
      3. Prescription Drug Use by Drug Class
      4. Polypharmacy
      5. Nonreceipt of Needed Prescription Drugs
      6. Due to Cost
      7. Deaths from HIV Disease
      8. Use of Antidepressants
      9. Antibiotics Prescribed for Colds
      10. Computerized Systems for Prescription Drugs
      11. Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics
      12. Spending on Prescription Drugs
      13. Data Tables for Special Feature
  15. Technical Notes
    1. Data Sources and Comparability
    2. Data Presentation
    3. Statistical Testing
    4. Survey Questions and Coding
    5. References
      1. 1.
      2. 2.
      3. 3.
      4. 4.
      5. 5.
      6. 6.
      7. 7.
      8. 8.
      9. 9.
      10. 10.
      11. 11.
      12. 12.
      13. 13.
      14. 14.
      15. 15.
      16. 16.
      17. 17.
      18. 18.
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      23. 23.
      24. 24.
      25. 25.
      26. 26.
      27. 27.
      28. 28.
      29. 29.
      30. 30.
      31. 31.
      32. 32.
      33. 33.
      34. 34.
      35. 35.
      36. 36.
      37. 37.
      38. 38.
      39. 39.
      40. 40.
      41. 41.
      42. 42.
      43. 43.
      44. 44.
      45. 45.
      46. 46.
      47. 47.
      48. 48.
      49. 49.
      50. 50.
      51. 51.
      52. 52.
      53. 53.
      54. 54.
      55. 55.
      56. 56.
      57. 57.
      58. 58.
      59. 59.
      60. 60.
      61. 61.
      62. 62.
      63. 63.
      64. 64.
      65. 65.
      66. 66.
      67. 67.
      68. 68.
      69. 69.
      70. 70.
      71. 71.
      72. 72.
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      74. 74.
      75. 75.
      76. 76.
      77. 77.
      78. 78.
      79. 79.
      80. 80.
      81. 81.
      82. 82.
  16. Trend Tables
    1. Health Status and Determinants
      1. Population
      2. Fertility and Natality
      3. Mortality
      4. Determinants and Measures of Health
    2. Utilization of Health Resources
      1. Ambulatory Care
      2. Inpatient Care
    3. Health Care Resources
      1. Personnel
      2. Facilities
    4. Health Care Expenditures and Payers
      1. National Health Expenditures
      2. Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs
      3. State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance
  17. Appendixes
    1. Appendix Contents
    2. Appendix I. Data Sources
      1. Introduction
      2. Government Sources
        1. Abortion Surveillance System
          1. Overview
          2. Selected Content
          3. Data Years
          4. Coverage
          5. Issues Affecting Interpretation
          6. Reference
          7. For More Information
        2. Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)
        3. Consumer Price Index (CPI)
        4. Current Population Survey (CPS)
        5. Department of Veterans Affairs National Enrollment and Patient Databases
        6. Employee Benefits Survey—See Appendix I, National Compensation Survey (NCS).
        7. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), Nationwide Inpatient Sample
        8. Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS)
        9. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)
        10. Medicare Administrative Data
        11. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS)
        12. Monitoring the Future (MTF) Study
        13. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)
        14. National Compensation Survey (NCS)
        15. National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA)
        16. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
        17. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
        18. National HIV Surveillance System
        19. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)
        20. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)
        21. National Immunization Survey (NIS)
        22. National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA)
        23. National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES)—See Appendix I, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).
        24. National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS)
        25. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)
        26. National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF)
        27. National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH)
        28. National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
          1. Birth File
          2. Fetal Death Data Set
          3. Mortality File
          4. Multiple Cause-of-Death File
          5. Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set
          6. Compressed Mortality File (CMF)
        29. Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)
        30. Population Census and Population Estimates
          1. Decennial Census
          2. Race Data on the 1990 Census
          3. Race Data on the 2000 Census
          4. Race Data on the 2010 Census
          5. Modified Decennial Census Files
          6. Postcensal Population Estimates
          7. Intercensal Population Estimates
          8. Bridged-race Population Estimates
        31. Quality Improvement Evaluation System (QIES)
        32. Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Surveillance
        33. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)
        34. United States Renal Data System (USRDS)
        35. Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)
      3. Private and Global Sources
        1. American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM)
        2. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)
        3. American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM)
        4. American Dental Association (ADA)
        5. American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals
        6. American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile
        7. American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
        8. Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)
        9. Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO)
        10. Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH)
        11. Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Census
        12. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Data
    3. Appendix II. Definitions and Methods
      1. Introduction
      2. Appendix II: Listing of Terms
        1. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)
        2. Active physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        3. Activities of daily living (ADL)
        4. Admission
        5. Age
        6. Age adjustment
        7. AIDS—See Appendix II, Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
        8. Alcohol consumption
        9. Any-listed diagnosis—See Appendix II, Diagnosis.
        10. Average annual rate of change (percent change)
        11. Average length of stay
        12. Basic actions difficulty
        13. Bed, health facility
        14. Binge drinking
        15. Birth cohort
        16. Birth rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
        17. Birthweight
        18. Blood pressure, high
        19. Body mass index (BMI)
        20. Cause of death
        21. Cause-of-death ranking
        22. Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
        23. Cholesterol
        24. Cigarette smoking
        25. Civilian noninstitutionalized population; Civilian population—See Appendix II, Population.
        26. Colorectal tests or procedures
        27. Community hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        28. Comparability ratio
        29. Compensation—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
        30. Complex activity limitation
        31. Consumer Price Index (CPI)
        32. Contraception
        33. Cost-charge ratio
        34. Critical access hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        35. Crude birth rate; Crude death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates; Rate: Death and related rates.
        36. Days of care
        37. Death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
        38. Dental caries
        39. Dental visit
        40. Diabetes
        41. Diagnosis
        42. Diagnostic and other nonsurgical procedure—See Appendix II, Procedure.
        43. Discharge
        44. Domiciliary care home—See Appendix II, Long-term care facility; Nursing home.
        45. Drug
        46. Drug abuse—See Appendix II, Illicit drug use.
        47. Education
        48. Emergency department
        49. Emergency department or emergency room visit
        50. Employer costs for employee compensation
        51. End-stage renal disease (ESRD)
        52. Ethnicity—See Appendix II, Hispanic origin.
        53. Exercise—See Appendix II, Physical activity, leisure-time.
        54. Expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national. [Also see Appendix I, National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA).]
        55. External cause of injury
        56. Family income
        57. Federal hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        58. Fee-for-service health insurance
        59. Fertility rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
        60. General hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        61. Geographic region
          1. Figure I. U.S. Census Bureau: Four geographic regions and nine divisions of the United States
        62. Gestation
        63. Gross domestic product (GDP)
        64. Health care contact
        65. Health expenditures, national
        66. Health insurance coverage
        67. Health maintenance organization (HMO)
        68. Health services and supplies expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        69. Health status, respondent-assessed
        70. Hearing trouble
        71. Hispanic origin
        72. HIV—See Appendix II, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.
        73. Home visit
        74. Hospital
        75. Hospital-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        76. Hospital day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
        77. Hospital utilization
        78. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease
        79. Hypertension—See Appendix II, Blood pressure, high.
        80. ICD; ICD codes—See Appendix II, Cause of death; International Classification of Diseases (ICD).
        81. Illicit drug use
        82. Immunization—See Appendix II, Vaccination.
        83. Incidence
        84. Income—See Appendix II, Family income.
        85. Individual practice association (IPA)—See Appendix II, Health maintenance organization (HMO).
        86. Industry of employment
        87. Infant death
        88. Injury
        89. Injury-related visit
        90. Inpatient
        91. Inpatient care—See Appendix II, Hospital utilization.
        92. Inpatient day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
        93. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)
        94. Insurance—See Appendix II, Health insurance coverage.
        95. Intermediate care facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        96. International Classification of Diseases (ICD)
        97. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision,  Clinical Modification (ICD–9–CM)
        98. International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision,  Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System  (ICD–10–CM/PCS)
        99. Late fetal death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
        100. Leading causes of death—See Appendix II, Cause-of-death ranking.
        101. Length of stay—See Appendix II, Average length of stay.
        102. Life expectancy
        103. Limitation of activity
        104. Long-term care facility
        105. Low birthweight—See Appendix II, Birthweight.
        106. Mammography
        107. Managed care
        108. Marital status
        109. Maternal age—See Appendix II, Age.
        110. Maternal education—See Appendix II, Education.
        111. Medicaid
        112. Medicaid payments
        113. Medical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        114. Medicare
        115. Metropolitan statistical area (MSA)
        116. Micropolitan statistical area
        117. Multum Lexicon Plus therapeutic class
        118. Neonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II, Rate:  Death and related rates.
        119. Nonprofit hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        120. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)—See Appendix II, Industry of employment.
        121. Notifiable disease
        122. Nursing home
        123. Nursing home expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        124. Obesity—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
        125. Occupancy rate
        126. Office-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        127. Office visit
        128. Operation—See Appendix II, Procedure.
        129. Outpatient department
        130. Outpatient surgery
        131. Outpatient visit
        132. Overweight—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
        133. Pap smear
        134. Patient—See Appendix II, Inpatient; Office visit; Outpatient visit.
        135. Percent change/percentage change—See Appendix II, Average annual rate of change (percent change).
        136. Perinatal mortality rate; ratio—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
        137. Personal care home with or without nursing—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        138. Personal health care expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        139. Physical activity, leisure-time
        140. Physician
        141. Physician specialty
        142. Population
        143. Postneonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
        144. Poverty
        145. Preferred provider organization (PPO)
        146. Prenatal care
        147. Prevalence
        148. Primary care specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        149. Private expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        150. Procedure
        151. Proprietary hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        152. Public expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        153. Purchasing power parities (PPPs)
        154. Race
        155. Rate
        156. Region—See Appendix II, Geographic region.
        157. Registered hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        158. Registration area
        159. Relative standard error (RSE)
        160. Relative survival rate
        161. Reporting area
        162. Resident, health facility
        163. Resident population—See Appendix II, Population.
        164. Rural—See Appendix II, Urbanization.
        165. Self-assessment of health—See Appendix II, Health status, respondent-assessed.
        166. Serious psychological distress
        167. Short-stay hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        168. Skilled nursing facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        169. Smoker—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
        170. Special hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        171. Substance use
        172. Suicidal ideation
        173. Surgery—See Appendix II, Outpatient surgery; Procedure.
        174. Surgical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        175. Tobacco use—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
        176. Uninsured
        177. Urbanization
        178. Usual source of care
        179. Vaccination
        180. Wages and salaries—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
        181. Years of potential life lost (YPLL)
  18. Index
    1. Index
      1. A
  19. Back Cover Page

  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 CDC HUS 2013 Web Site
    2. Slide 2 MindTouch Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 3 Excel Spreadsheet
    4. Slide 4 Cover Page
    5. Slide 5 At A Glance
    6. Slide 6 Table 18
    7. Slide 7 Table 100
    8. Slide 8 Data Ecosystem
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
  5. Health United States 2013
  6. Cover Page
  7. Inside Cover Page
  8. Organizations
  9. Preface
    1. The 2013 Edition
      1. Chartbook
      2. Trend Tables
      3. Appendixes
      4. Index
    2. Data Considerations
      1. Racial and Ethnic Data
      2. Education and Income Data
      3. Disability Data
      4. Statistical Significance
    3. Accessing Health, United States
    4. Questions?
    5. References
      1. 1
      2. 2
      3. 3
  10. Acknowledgments
  11. List of Chartbook Figures
    1. Mortality
      1. Figure 1. Life expectancy at birth, by selected characteristics: United States, 1980-2010
      2. Figure 2. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates: United States, 2000-2010
      3. Figure 3. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death for all ages, by sex: United States, 2000-2010
      4. Figure 4. Motor vehicle-related death rates among persons aged 15-24, by sex and age: United States, 2000-2010
    2. Natality
      1. Figure 5. Teenage childbearing, by maternal age and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2002-2012
    3. Morbidity
      1. Figure 6. Respondent-reported heart disease prevalence among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012
    4. Disability Measures
      1. Figure 7. Basic actions difficulty and complex activity limitation among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012
    5. Health Risk Factors
      1. Figure 8. Current cigarette smoking among high school seniors and adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 9. Uncontrolled high blood pressure among adults aged 20 and over with hypertension, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
      3. Figure 10. Obesity among children and adolescents, by age: United States, 2003-2004 through 2011-2012
      4. Figure 11. Overweight and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
    6. Prevention
      1. Figure 12. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 and over, by type of vaccination and age: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 13. Vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13-17, by type of vaccine: United States, 2012
    7. Health Insurance
      1. Figure 14. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 18-64, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 15. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 19-25, by type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
    8. Utilization and Access
      1. Figure 16. One or more emergency department visits in the past 12 months, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012
      2. Figure 17. No usual source of care among children under age 18, by type of coverage: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012
      3. Figure 18. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care or nonreceipt of needed dental care in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012
    9. Personal Health Care Expenditures
      1. Figure 19. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds: United States, 2001-2011
    10. Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
      1. Figure 20. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by number of drugs taken and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      2. Figure 21. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by age and selected drug class: United States, 1988-1994 and 2007-2010
      3. Figure 22. Number of prescription drugs taken in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, 2007-2010
      4. Figure 23. Nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by insurance status and percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012
      5. Figure 24. Age-adjusted death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease for all ages, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1990-2010
      6. Figure 25. Use of prescription antidepressants in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      7. Figure 26. Antibiotics ordered or provided during emergency department, outpatient, and physician visits for cold symptom diagnoses, by age: United States, average annual, 1995-1996 through 2009-2010
      8. Figure 27. Computerized systems for prescription drugs, by provider and system type: United States, 2010
      9. Figure 28. Drug poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics among persons aged 15 and over, by race and Hispanic origin, sex, and age: United States, 1999-2000 through 2009-2010
      10. Figure 29. Retail prescription drug expenditures, annual percent change, and spending by payer: United States, 2001-2011
  12. List of Trend Tables
    1. Health Status and Determinants
      1. Population
        1. Table 1. Resident population, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2012
        2. Table 2. Persons below poverty level, by selected characteristics, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1973-2012
      2. Fertility and Natality
        1. Table 3. Crude birth rates, fertility rates, and birth rates, by age, race, and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1950-2012
        2. Table 4. Teenage childbearing, by age and detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        3. Table 5. Nonmarital childbearing, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother, and maternal age: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        4. Table 6. Low birthweight live births, by detailed race, Hispanic origin, and smoking status of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012
        5. Table 7. Low birthweight live births, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, 2000-2002, 2003-2005, and 2010-2012
        6. Table 8. Legal abortions, legal abortion rates, and legal abortion ratios: United States and 46 continuous reporting areas, 2001-2010
        7. Table 9. Contraceptive use in the past month among women aged 15-44, by age, race and Hispanic origin, and method of contraception: United States, selected years 1982-2010
        8. Table 10. Breastfeeding among mothers aged 15-44, by year of baby's birth and selected characteristics of mother: United States, average annual 1986-1988 through 2005-2007
      3. Mortality
        1. Table 11. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1983-2010
        2. Table 12. Infant mortality rates, by birthweight: United States, selected years 1983-2010
        3. Table 13. Infant mortality rates, fetal mortality rates, and perinatal mortality rates, by race: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        4. Table 14. Infant mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010
        5. Table 15. Neonatal mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, and state: United States, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010
        6. Table 16. Infant mortality rates and international rankings: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1960-2010
        7. Table 17. Life expectancy at birth and at age 65, by sex: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1980-2011
        8. Table 18. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1900-2010
        9. Table 19. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, Hispanic origin, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1979-1981, 1989-1991, and 2008-2010
        10. Table 20. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        11. Table 21. Years of potential life lost before age 75 for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1980-2010
        12. Table 22. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, 1980 and 2010
        13. Table 23. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by age: United States, 1980 and 2010
        14. Table 24. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, sex, region, and urbanization level: United States, average annual, selected years 1996-1998 through 2008-2010
        15. Table 25. Death rates for all causes, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        16. Table 26. Death rates for diseases of heart, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        17. Table 27. Death rates for cerebrovascular diseases, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        18. Table 28. Death rates for malignant neoplasms, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        19. Table 29. Death rates for malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lung, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        20. Table 30. Death rates for malignant neoplasm of breast among females, by race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        21. Table 31. Death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        22. Table 32. Death rates for drug poisoning and drug poisoning involving opioid analgesics, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1999-2010
        23. Table 33. Death rates for motor vehicle-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        24. Table 34. Death rates for homicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        25. Table 35. Death rates for suicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010
        26. Table 36. Death rates for firearm-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1970-2010
        27. Table 37. Deaths from selected occupational diseases among persons aged 15 and over: United States, selected years 1980-2010
        28. Table 38. Occupational fatal injuries and rates, by industry, sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1995-2011
      4. Determinants and Measures of Health
        1. Table 39. Selected notifiable disease rates and number of new cases: United States, selected years 1950-2011
        2. Table 40. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses, by year of diagnosis and selected characteristics: United States, 2008-2011
        3. Table 41. Health conditions among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1999 through 2010-2012
        4. Table 42. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for selected cancer sites, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1990-2010
        5. Table 43. Five-year relative cancer survival rates for selected cancer sites, by race and sex: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1975-1977 through 2003-2009
        6. Table 44. Respondent-reported prevalence of heart disease, cancer, and stroke among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        7. Table 45. Number of respondent-reported chronic conditions from 10 selected conditions among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2002-2012
        8. Table 46. Diabetes prevalence and glycemic control among adults aged 20 and over, by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
        9. Table 47. End-stage renal disease patients, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980-2011
        10. Table 48. Severe headache or migraine, low back pain, and neck pain among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        11. Table 49. Disability measures among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        12. Table 50. Vision limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        13. Table 51. Hearing limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2007-2012
        14. Table 52. Respondent-assessed fair-poor health status, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2012
        15. Table 53. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        16. Table 54. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 65 and over, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        17. Table 55. Serious psychological distress in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        18. Table 56. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, and age: United States, selected years 1965-2012
        19. Table 57. Age-adjusted prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults aged 25 and over, by sex, race, and education level: United States, selected years 1974-2012
        20. Table 58. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, age, and education level: United States, average annual, selected years 1990-1992 through 2010-2012
        21. Table 59. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        22. Table 60. Use of selected substances in the past month among persons aged 12 and over, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 2002-2012
        23. Table 61. Use of selected substances in the past 30 days among high school seniors, 10th graders, and 8th graders, by sex and race: United States, selected years 1980-2012
        24. Table 62. Health risk behaviors among students in grades 9-12, by sex, grade level, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1991-2011
        25. Table 63. Heavier drinking and drinking five or more drinks in a day among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        26. Table 64. Selected health conditions and risk factors, by age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2011-2012
        27. Table 65. Hypertension among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
        28. Table 66. Cholesterol among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012
        29. Table 67. Mean macronutrient intake among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010
        30. Table 68. Participation in leisure-time aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities that meet the federal 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1998-2012
        31. Table 69. Healthy weight, overweight, and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1960-1962 through 2009-2012
        32. Table 70. Obesity among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1963-1965 through 2009-2012
        33. Table 71. Untreated dental caries, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010
    2. Utilization of Health Resources
      1. Ambulatory Care
        1. Table 72. No usual source of health care among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012
        2. Table 73. No usual source of health care among adults aged 18-64, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012
        3. Table 74. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care, nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs, or nonreceipt of needed dental care during the past 12 months due to cost, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        4. Table 75. Selected measures of access to medical care among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012
        5. Table 76. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care during the past 12 months due to cost, by state: 25 most populous states and United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        6. Table 77. No health care visits to an office or clinic within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012
        7. Table 78. Health care visits to doctor offices, emergency departments, and home visits within the past 12 months, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        8. Table 79. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among children aged 19-35 months, by race, Hispanic origin, poverty level, and location of residence in metropolitan statistical area: United States, selected years 1995-2012
        9. Table 80. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among adolescents aged 13-17, by selected characteristics: United States, 2006-2012
        10. Table 81. Influenza vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012
        11. Table 82. Pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012
        12. Table 83. Use of mammography among women aged 40 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        13. Table 84. Use of Pap smears among women aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        14. Table 85. Use of colorectal tests or procedures among adults aged 50-75, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2000-2010
        15. Table 86. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        16. Table 87. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        17. Table 88. Initial injury-related visits to hospital emergency departments, by sex, age, and intent and mechanism of injury: United States, average annual, selected years 2005-2006 through 2010-2011
        18. Table 89. Visits to physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, and hospital emergency departments, by age, sex, and race: United States, selected years 1995-2011
        19. Table 90. Visits to primary care generalist and specialty care physicians, by selected characteristics and type of physician: United States, selected years 1980-2010 
        20. Table 91. Dental visits in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        21. Table 92. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
        22. Table 93. Selected prescription drug classes used in the past 30 days, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010
      2. Inpatient Care
        1. Table 94. Persons with hospital stays in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012
        2. Table 95. Discharges, days of care, and average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980 through 2009-2010
        3. Table 96. Discharges in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        4. Table 97. Discharge rate in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        5. Table 98. Average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        6. Table 99. Discharges with at least one procedure in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected procedures: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010
        7. Table 100. Hospital admissions, average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        8. Table 100. Hospital admissions  average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975–2011
    3. Health Care Resources
      1. Personnel
        1. Table 101. Active physicians and physicians in patient care, by state: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        2. Table 102. Doctors of medicine, by place of medical education and activity: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1975-2011
        3. Table 103. Doctors of medicine in primary care, by specialty: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1949-2011
        4. Table 104. Active dentists, by state: United States, selected years 1993-2011
        5. Table 105. Healthcare employment and wages, by selected occupations: United States, selected years 2001-2012
        6. Table 106. First-year enrollment and graduates of health professions schools, and number of schools, by selected profession: United States, selected academic years 1980-1981 through 2010-2011
      2. Facilities
        1. Table 107. Hospitals, beds, and occupancy rates, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011
        2. Table 108. Community hospital beds and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011
        3. Table 109. Occupancy rates in community hospitals and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011
        4. Table 110. Nursing homes, beds, residents, and occupancy rates, by state: United States, selected years 1995-2012
        5. Table 111. Medicare-certified providers and suppliers: United States, selected years 1975-2011
    4. Health Care Expenditures and Payors
      1. National Health Expenditures
        1. Table 112. Gross domestic product, national health expenditures, per capita amounts, percent distribution, and average annual percent change: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        2. Table 113. Consumer Price Index and average annual percent change for all items, selected items, and medical care components: United States, selected years 1960-2012
        3. Table 114. National health expenditures, average annual percent change, and percent distribution, by type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        4. Table 115. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds and type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011
        5. Table 116. Cost of hospital discharges with common hospital operating room procedures in nonfederal community hospitals, by age and selected principal procedure: United States, selected years 2000-2011
        6. Table 117. Expenses for health care and prescribed medicine, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        7. Table 118. Sources of payment for health care, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        8. Table 119. Out-of-pocket health care expenses among persons with medical expenses, by age: United States, selected years 1987-2010
        9. Table 120. Expenditures for health services and supplies and percent distribution, by sponsor: United States, selected years 1987-2011
        10. Table 121. Employers' costs per employee-hour worked for total compensation, wages and salaries, and health insurance, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2013
      2. Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs
        1. Table 122. Private health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        2. Table 123. Private health insurance coverage obtained through the workplace among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        3. Table 124. Medicaid coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        4. Table 125. No health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012
        5. Table 126. Health insurance coverage of noninstitutionalized Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and over, by type of coverage and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2011
        6. Table 127. Medicare enrollees and expenditures and percent distribution, by Medicare program and type of service: United States and other areas, selected years 1970-2012
        7. Table 128. Medicare enrollees and program payments among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries, by sex and age: United States and other areas, selected years 1994-2012
        8. Table 129. Medicare beneficiaries, by race, Hispanic origin, and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2010
        9. Table 130. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by basis of eligibility, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010
        10. Table 131. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by type of service: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010 
        11. Table 132. Department of Veterans Affairs health care expenditures and use, and persons treated, by selected characteristics: United States, selected fiscal years 1970-2012
      3. State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance
        1. Table 133. Medicare enrollees, enrollees in managed care, payment per enrollee, and short-stay hospital utilization, by state: United States, selected years 1994 and 2012
        2. Table 134. Medicaid beneficiaries, beneficiaries in managed care, and payments per beneficiary, by state: United States, selected fiscal years 2000-2010
        3. Table 135. Persons without health insurance coverage, by state: United States, average annual, 2003-2005 through 2010-2012
  13. At a Glance Table and Highlights
    1. At a Glance Table
    2. Highlights
      1. Life Expectancy and Mortality
      2. Fertility and Natality
      3. Health Risk Factors
        1. Children
        2. Adults
      4. Measures of Health and Disease Prevalence
      5. Health Care Utilization
        1. Use of Health Care Services
        2. Use of Preventive Medical Care Services
      6. Nonreceipt of Needed Medical Care, Prescription Drugs, and Dental Care Due to Cost
      7. Health Care Resources
      8. Health Care Expenditures and Payers
        1. Health Care Expenditures
        2. Health Care Payers
      9. Health Insurance Coverage
  14. Chartbook With Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
    1. Mortality
      1. Life Expectancy at Birth
      2. Infant Mortality
      3. Selected Causes of Death
      4. Motor Vehicle-related Death Rates
    2. Natality
      1. Teenage Childbearing
    3. Morbidity
      1. Heart Disease Prevalence
    4. Disability Measures
      1. Basic Actions Difficulty and Complex Activity Limitation
    5. Health Risk Factors
      1. Current Cigarette Smoking
      2. Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure
      3. Obesity Among Children
      4. Overweight and Obesity Among Adults
    6. Prevention
      1. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination
      2. Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17
    7. Health Insurance
      1. Coverage Among Adults Aged 18–64
      2. Coverage Among Adults Aged 19–25
    8. Utilization and Access
      1. Emergency Department Use
      2. Usual Source of Care Among Children
      3. Delay or Nonreceipt of Medical Care or​ Nonreceipt of Dental Care Due to Cost
    9. Personal Health Care Expenditures
      1. Major Source of Funds
    10. Special Feature on Prescription Drugs
      1. Introduction
      2. Prescription Drug Use
      3. Prescription Drug Use by Drug Class
      4. Polypharmacy
      5. Nonreceipt of Needed Prescription Drugs
      6. Due to Cost
      7. Deaths from HIV Disease
      8. Use of Antidepressants
      9. Antibiotics Prescribed for Colds
      10. Computerized Systems for Prescription Drugs
      11. Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics
      12. Spending on Prescription Drugs
      13. Data Tables for Special Feature
  15. Technical Notes
    1. Data Sources and Comparability
    2. Data Presentation
    3. Statistical Testing
    4. Survey Questions and Coding
    5. References
      1. 1.
      2. 2.
      3. 3.
      4. 4.
      5. 5.
      6. 6.
      7. 7.
      8. 8.
      9. 9.
      10. 10.
      11. 11.
      12. 12.
      13. 13.
      14. 14.
      15. 15.
      16. 16.
      17. 17.
      18. 18.
      19. 19.
      20. 20.
      21. 21.
      22. 22.
      23. 23.
      24. 24.
      25. 25.
      26. 26.
      27. 27.
      28. 28.
      29. 29.
      30. 30.
      31. 31.
      32. 32.
      33. 33.
      34. 34.
      35. 35.
      36. 36.
      37. 37.
      38. 38.
      39. 39.
      40. 40.
      41. 41.
      42. 42.
      43. 43.
      44. 44.
      45. 45.
      46. 46.
      47. 47.
      48. 48.
      49. 49.
      50. 50.
      51. 51.
      52. 52.
      53. 53.
      54. 54.
      55. 55.
      56. 56.
      57. 57.
      58. 58.
      59. 59.
      60. 60.
      61. 61.
      62. 62.
      63. 63.
      64. 64.
      65. 65.
      66. 66.
      67. 67.
      68. 68.
      69. 69.
      70. 70.
      71. 71.
      72. 72.
      73. 73.
      74. 74.
      75. 75.
      76. 76.
      77. 77.
      78. 78.
      79. 79.
      80. 80.
      81. 81.
      82. 82.
  16. Trend Tables
    1. Health Status and Determinants
      1. Population
      2. Fertility and Natality
      3. Mortality
      4. Determinants and Measures of Health
    2. Utilization of Health Resources
      1. Ambulatory Care
      2. Inpatient Care
    3. Health Care Resources
      1. Personnel
      2. Facilities
    4. Health Care Expenditures and Payers
      1. National Health Expenditures
      2. Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs
      3. State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance
  17. Appendixes
    1. Appendix Contents
    2. Appendix I. Data Sources
      1. Introduction
      2. Government Sources
        1. Abortion Surveillance System
          1. Overview
          2. Selected Content
          3. Data Years
          4. Coverage
          5. Issues Affecting Interpretation
          6. Reference
          7. For More Information
        2. Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)
        3. Consumer Price Index (CPI)
        4. Current Population Survey (CPS)
        5. Department of Veterans Affairs National Enrollment and Patient Databases
        6. Employee Benefits Survey—See Appendix I, National Compensation Survey (NCS).
        7. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), Nationwide Inpatient Sample
        8. Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS)
        9. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)
        10. Medicare Administrative Data
        11. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS)
        12. Monitoring the Future (MTF) Study
        13. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)
        14. National Compensation Survey (NCS)
        15. National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA)
        16. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
        17. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
        18. National HIV Surveillance System
        19. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)
        20. National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)
        21. National Immunization Survey (NIS)
        22. National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA)
        23. National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES)—See Appendix I, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).
        24. National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS)
        25. National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)
        26. National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF)
        27. National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH)
        28. National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
          1. Birth File
          2. Fetal Death Data Set
          3. Mortality File
          4. Multiple Cause-of-Death File
          5. Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set
          6. Compressed Mortality File (CMF)
        29. Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)
        30. Population Census and Population Estimates
          1. Decennial Census
          2. Race Data on the 1990 Census
          3. Race Data on the 2000 Census
          4. Race Data on the 2010 Census
          5. Modified Decennial Census Files
          6. Postcensal Population Estimates
          7. Intercensal Population Estimates
          8. Bridged-race Population Estimates
        31. Quality Improvement Evaluation System (QIES)
        32. Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Surveillance
        33. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)
        34. United States Renal Data System (USRDS)
        35. Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)
      3. Private and Global Sources
        1. American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM)
        2. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)
        3. American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM)
        4. American Dental Association (ADA)
        5. American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals
        6. American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile
        7. American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
        8. Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)
        9. Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO)
        10. Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH)
        11. Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Census
        12. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Data
    3. Appendix II. Definitions and Methods
      1. Introduction
      2. Appendix II: Listing of Terms
        1. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)
        2. Active physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        3. Activities of daily living (ADL)
        4. Admission
        5. Age
        6. Age adjustment
        7. AIDS—See Appendix II, Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
        8. Alcohol consumption
        9. Any-listed diagnosis—See Appendix II, Diagnosis.
        10. Average annual rate of change (percent change)
        11. Average length of stay
        12. Basic actions difficulty
        13. Bed, health facility
        14. Binge drinking
        15. Birth cohort
        16. Birth rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
        17. Birthweight
        18. Blood pressure, high
        19. Body mass index (BMI)
        20. Cause of death
        21. Cause-of-death ranking
        22. Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
        23. Cholesterol
        24. Cigarette smoking
        25. Civilian noninstitutionalized population; Civilian population—See Appendix II, Population.
        26. Colorectal tests or procedures
        27. Community hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        28. Comparability ratio
        29. Compensation—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
        30. Complex activity limitation
        31. Consumer Price Index (CPI)
        32. Contraception
        33. Cost-charge ratio
        34. Critical access hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        35. Crude birth rate; Crude death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates; Rate: Death and related rates.
        36. Days of care
        37. Death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
        38. Dental caries
        39. Dental visit
        40. Diabetes
        41. Diagnosis
        42. Diagnostic and other nonsurgical procedure—See Appendix II, Procedure.
        43. Discharge
        44. Domiciliary care home—See Appendix II, Long-term care facility; Nursing home.
        45. Drug
        46. Drug abuse—See Appendix II, Illicit drug use.
        47. Education
        48. Emergency department
        49. Emergency department or emergency room visit
        50. Employer costs for employee compensation
        51. End-stage renal disease (ESRD)
        52. Ethnicity—See Appendix II, Hispanic origin.
        53. Exercise—See Appendix II, Physical activity, leisure-time.
        54. Expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national. [Also see Appendix I, National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA).]
        55. External cause of injury
        56. Family income
        57. Federal hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        58. Fee-for-service health insurance
        59. Fertility rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
        60. General hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        61. Geographic region
          1. Figure I. U.S. Census Bureau: Four geographic regions and nine divisions of the United States
        62. Gestation
        63. Gross domestic product (GDP)
        64. Health care contact
        65. Health expenditures, national
        66. Health insurance coverage
        67. Health maintenance organization (HMO)
        68. Health services and supplies expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        69. Health status, respondent-assessed
        70. Hearing trouble
        71. Hispanic origin
        72. HIV—See Appendix II, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.
        73. Home visit
        74. Hospital
        75. Hospital-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        76. Hospital day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
        77. Hospital utilization
        78. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease
        79. Hypertension—See Appendix II, Blood pressure, high.
        80. ICD; ICD codes—See Appendix II, Cause of death; International Classification of Diseases (ICD).
        81. Illicit drug use
        82. Immunization—See Appendix II, Vaccination.
        83. Incidence
        84. Income—See Appendix II, Family income.
        85. Individual practice association (IPA)—See Appendix II, Health maintenance organization (HMO).
        86. Industry of employment
        87. Infant death
        88. Injury
        89. Injury-related visit
        90. Inpatient
        91. Inpatient care—See Appendix II, Hospital utilization.
        92. Inpatient day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
        93. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)
        94. Insurance—See Appendix II, Health insurance coverage.
        95. Intermediate care facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        96. International Classification of Diseases (ICD)
        97. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision,  Clinical Modification (ICD–9–CM)
        98. International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision,  Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System  (ICD–10–CM/PCS)
        99. Late fetal death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
        100. Leading causes of death—See Appendix II, Cause-of-death ranking.
        101. Length of stay—See Appendix II, Average length of stay.
        102. Life expectancy
        103. Limitation of activity
        104. Long-term care facility
        105. Low birthweight—See Appendix II, Birthweight.
        106. Mammography
        107. Managed care
        108. Marital status
        109. Maternal age—See Appendix II, Age.
        110. Maternal education—See Appendix II, Education.
        111. Medicaid
        112. Medicaid payments
        113. Medical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        114. Medicare
        115. Metropolitan statistical area (MSA)
        116. Micropolitan statistical area
        117. Multum Lexicon Plus therapeutic class
        118. Neonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II, Rate:  Death and related rates.
        119. Nonprofit hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        120. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)—See Appendix II, Industry of employment.
        121. Notifiable disease
        122. Nursing home
        123. Nursing home expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        124. Obesity—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
        125. Occupancy rate
        126. Office-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
        127. Office visit
        128. Operation—See Appendix II, Procedure.
        129. Outpatient department
        130. Outpatient surgery
        131. Outpatient visit
        132. Overweight—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
        133. Pap smear
        134. Patient—See Appendix II, Inpatient; Office visit; Outpatient visit.
        135. Percent change/percentage change—See Appendix II, Average annual rate of change (percent change).
        136. Perinatal mortality rate; ratio—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
        137. Personal care home with or without nursing—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        138. Personal health care expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        139. Physical activity, leisure-time
        140. Physician
        141. Physician specialty
        142. Population
        143. Postneonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
        144. Poverty
        145. Preferred provider organization (PPO)
        146. Prenatal care
        147. Prevalence
        148. Primary care specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        149. Private expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        150. Procedure
        151. Proprietary hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        152. Public expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
        153. Purchasing power parities (PPPs)
        154. Race
        155. Rate
        156. Region—See Appendix II, Geographic region.
        157. Registered hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        158. Registration area
        159. Relative standard error (RSE)
        160. Relative survival rate
        161. Reporting area
        162. Resident, health facility
        163. Resident population—See Appendix II, Population.
        164. Rural—See Appendix II, Urbanization.
        165. Self-assessment of health—See Appendix II, Health status, respondent-assessed.
        166. Serious psychological distress
        167. Short-stay hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        168. Skilled nursing facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
        169. Smoker—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
        170. Special hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
        171. Substance use
        172. Suicidal ideation
        173. Surgery—See Appendix II, Outpatient surgery; Procedure.
        174. Surgical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
        175. Tobacco use—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
        176. Uninsured
        177. Urbanization
        178. Usual source of care
        179. Vaccination
        180. Wages and salaries—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
        181. Years of potential life lost (YPLL)
  18. Index
    1. Index
      1. A
  19. Back Cover Page

Story

Data Science for Health United States 2013

Does this persuade me that the claims and evidence are true?

  • The Cover Page conveys the report is about Health Trends for the United States from the title and graphic..
  • The Copyright Information says "All material, except certain quoted material, contained in this report is in the public domain and may be used and reprinted without special permission."
  • This report does not have a Data Citation like the Force11 Data Citation, but could have.
  • This report is produced by three government organizations: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Center for Health Statistics.
  • This is the 37th report on the health status of the nation and is submitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and the Congress of the United States in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Service Act.
  • The National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics served in a review capacity.
  • The Preface clearly states the principal contents: 

I was able to add links to each of these above, except for Health, United States: In Brief because it is a 44 page PDF subset of the full report (which it links to and I find awkward) and the "related data products" which I am not sure of because there are multiple possibilities.

I had to explore the report PDF and web pages before I could make these statements with confidence.

In the broader context, this is the third of a three part activity as follows:

  • A Hack-a-Thon, but with a Scraper Wiki (MindTouch) to produce a detailed Wiki Table of Contents and multiple Spreadsheet Tables for Spotfire analytics (Data Science for the HHS IDEALAB);
  • A Code-a-Palooza, but without Code using Spotfire so a very large relational database (Health Datapalooza V Medicare Claims) can be used all in memory for Spotfire analytics; and
  • A Meetup to mentor and train data scientists and others in creating a series of Data Publications in Data Browsers starting with Health United States 2013 (this Story)

Now I assume the PDF version of Health United States 2013 is the most authoritative version because the end product is the print and PDF versions, not a "data publication in a data browser". So the challenge is put the PDF online in such a way that serves both functions.

There is some help from the online content with Web pages that link to the figures and tables in PDF, PowerPoint, and Excel that I used below in place of the PDF contents for those for the List of Chartbook Figures and List of Trend Tables in the Table of Contents.

My inclination is to start with the PDF Table of Contents to create the initial structured content and then start populating the structure from the front and the back to the middle. I find that the back (usually Appendices) contain some of the most valuable information for data publications because they are all about the data, in this case: Appendix I. Data Sources and Appendix II. Definitions and Methods. Working with the Appendices, I can see that Appendix I. Data Sources is the metadata for the "data ecosystem" and Appendix II. Definitions and Methods is the data dictionary at the meta-level and the individual columns in the spreadsheets are the data dictionary at the element-level.

Next, I want to build the "data ecosystem", which in this case will be "a spreadsheet of the spreadsheets" for the 135 spreadsheets, of which 29 have figures, from the List of Trend Tables and List of Chartbook Figures, respectively.

Finally, I want to create a "data publication in a data browser" example for each unique feature of the Health United States 2013 like the At-a-Glance "big table" and Chart Book "data stories".

I noticed that the PDF Navigation Side-bar is confusing to use because of the overall hierarchy is not a simple Table of Contents and not every item in the hierarchy you click on goes to a separate page. PDF is definitely not a "data publication in a data browser". In addition, the page numbers in the PDF Table of Contents are not the Page Numbers of the PDF Pages. For example: The Appendix Contents says Appendix I. Data Sources is on Page 385 but it actually is Page 399 in the PDF file. How is one to properly cite the metadata and the data? There must be a better solution and there is.

 There are also many details involved in copying the PDF content to MindTouch that are both art and content science like: assigning levels, chunking into paragraphs, spell checking for run-together words, etc. Sometimes on needs to edit at the markup level which MindTouch easily supports by switching from Normal-View to Source-View mode.

I want to look at every PDF page, but only reproduce one example of each section for brevity at the stage of the process of making a "data publication in a data browser".

I should also mention the importance of introducing <br> markup into the editing and using Google Chrome Find to locate and eliminate them with few exceptions. I want to pick on of the most difficult tables to show that MindTouch (and I) can deal with them. Their was only one Figure in the Appendix which I did a Snapshot of, copied to PowerPoint (or Microsoft Draw works as well), and saved it with a file name that identifies it. One I attached PDF, PNG, etc. files to the MindTouch wiki, I can move them to another page like I did with the main PDF and Cover Page Graphic in this case. Well you cannot see me move them, but trust me I did and it worked!

I have been at this for a couple of hours now and need to break for lunch. Actually, I have not been doing this full time for a couple of hours because I have had email and phone calls that interrupted me, but I was able to come right back and pick up where I left off because I am an organized person! Next I need to deal with the "data stories" and "data ecosystem". That should take me a while longer. I wonder how long it took all the authors and contributors to produce that PDF file that I am having so much fun dissecting and perfecting.

After lunch, I reviewed my work and found considerable room for improvement in organization and purpose from actually re-reading the report and paying more attention to the content than I did when first organizing and copying it to MindTouch. I think I see how to make the flow of the report more logical and integrated into a data publication. The key is the integration of the data stories and the data tables that is made possible by the on-line technologies being used than with the PDF file format and its essentially non-web browser. It is hard for me to see at this stage how a PDF file can be a data publication in a data browser on the web.

As I was working to populate the At A Glance Table and Highlights section I found Highlights for Health Insurance Coverage was omitted from the Contents. Certainly this does not mean that the "claims and evidence are not true", just that human error is found in PDF reports that need to be corrected and can be more easily corrected in on-line versions as the authoritative source. MindTouch captures the versioning that occurs in the authoring and revision process.

MORE TO FOLLOW

Slides

Slide 1 CDC HUS 2013 Web Site

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm

HUS2013WebSite.png

Slide 2 MindTouch Knowledge Base

http://semanticommunity.info/Data_Science/Data_Science_for_Health_United_States_2013

HUS2013MindTouchKnowledgeBase.png

Slide 4 Cover Page

Web Player

HUS2013Spotfire-CoverPage.png

Slide 5 At A Glance

HUS2013Spotfire-AtaGlance.png

Slide 6 Table 18

HUS2013Spotfire-Table18.png

Slide 7 Table 100

HUS2013Spotfire-Table100.png

Slide 8 Data Ecosystem

HUS2013Spotfire-DataEcosystem.png

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Research Notes

Cover Page

huscover2013.jpg

Inside Cover Page

Copyright information
Permission has been obtained from the copyright holders to reproduce certain quoted material in this report. Further reproduction of this material is prohibited without specific permission of the copyright holder. All other material contained in this report is in the public domain and may be used and reprinted without special permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

Suggested citation
National Center for Health Statistics.
Health, United States, 2013: With Special Feature
on Prescription Drugs. Hyattsville, MD. 2014.

Library of Congress Catalog Number 76–641496
For sale by Superintendent of Documents
U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, DC 20402

Organizations

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Kathleen Sebelius
Secretary

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H.
Director

National Center for Health Statistics
Charles J. Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A.
Director

Preface

Health, United States, 2013 is the 37th report on the health status of the nation and is submitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and the Congress of the United States in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Service Act. This report was compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics served in a review capacity.

The Health, United States series presents an annual overview of national trends in health statistics. The report contains a Chartbook that assesses the nation's health by presenting trends and current information on selected measures of morbidity, mortality, health care utilization and access, health risk factors, prevention, health insurance, and personal health care expenditures. This year's Chartbook includes a Special Feature on Prescription Drugs. The report also contains 135 Trend Tables organized around four major subject areas: health status and determinants, health care utilization, health care resources, and health care expenditures. A companion product—Health, United States: In Brief—features information extracted from the full report. The complete report, In Brief, and related data products are available on the Health, United States website at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

The 2013 Edition

Health, United States, 2013 contains a summary At a Glance table that displays selected indicators of health and their determinants, cross-referenced to charts and tables in the report. This is followed by a Highlights section, a Chartbook, detailed Trend Tables, two detailed Appendixes, and an Index. The major sections of the 2013 report are described below.

Chartbook

The 2013 Chartbook contains 29 charts, including 10 charts on this year's Special Feature on Prescription Drugs (Figures 20–29). This Special Feature provides an overview of prescription drug use in the United States. Data are presented on the number and classes of drugs used by Americans. Access problems—those who did not receive needed prescription drugs in the past 12 months due to cost—are presented by insurance and poverty status. The impact of specific groups of drugs used to control chronic disease (i.e., antiretrovirals to treat HIV disease and antidepressant drugs) is presented. Quality issues are examined by looking at the misuse of antibiotics to treat cold symptoms, deaths from misuse of opioid analgesic drugs, and the adoption by providers of electronic health record systems, which are designed to improve safety. And finally, the growth in national spending on prescription drugs is shown.

Trend Tables

The Chartbook is followed by 135 detailed Trend Tables that highlight major trends in health statistics. Comparability across editions of Health, United States is fostered by including similar Trend Tables in each volume, and timeliness is maintained by improving the content of tables to reflect key topics in public health. An important criterion used in selecting these tables is the availability of comparable national data over a period of several years.

Appendixes

Appendix I. Data Sources describes each data source used in Health, United States and provides references for further information about the sources. Data sources are listed alphabetically within two broad categories: Government Sources, and Private and Global Sources.

Appendix II. Definitions and Methods is an alphabetical listing of selected terms used in Health, United States. It also contains information on the statistical methodologies used in the report.

Index

The Index to the Trend Tables and figures is a useful tool for locating data by topic. Tables and figures are cross-referenced by such topics as child and adolescent health; older population aged 65 and over; women's health; men's health; state data; American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, black or African American, and Hispanic-origin populations; education; injury; disability; and metropolitan and nonmetropolitan data. Many of the Index topics are also available as conveniently grouped data packages on the Health, United States website.

Data Considerations

Racial and Ethnic Data

Many tables in Health, United States present data according to race and Hispanic origin, consistent with a department-wide emphasis on expanding racial and ethnic detail when presenting health data. Trend data on race and ethnicity are presented in the greatest detail possible after taking into account the quality of the data, the amount of missing data, and the number of observations. These issues significantly affect the availability of reportable data for certain populations, such as the Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population and the American Indian and Alaska Native population. Standards for the classification of federal data on race and ethnicity are described in an appendix (See Appendix II, Race).

Education and Income Data

Many Trend Tables in Health, United States present data according to socioeconomic status, using education and family income as proxy measures. Education and income data are generally obtained directly from survey respondents and are not usually available from records-based data collection systems. (See Appendix II, Education; Family income; Poverty.)

Disability Data

Disability can include the presence of physical or mental impairments that limit a person's ability to perform an important activity and affect the use of or need for support, accommodation, or intervention to improve functioning. Information on disability in the U.S. population is critical to health planning and policy. Several initiatives are currently under way to coordinate and standardize the measurement of disability across federal data systems. Health, United States, 2009 introduced the first detailed Trend Table using data from the National Health Interview Survey to create disability measures consistent with two of the conceptual components that have been identified in disability models and legislation: basic actions difficulty and complex activity limitation. Basic actions difficulty captures limitations or difficulties in movement and sensory, emotional, or mental functioning that are associated with a health problem. Complex activity limitation describes limitations or restrictions in a person's ability to participate fully in social role activities such as working or maintaining a household. Health, United States, 2010 expanded the use of these measures to many of the tables from the National Health Interview Survey. Health, United States, 2013 includes the following disability-related information for the civilian noninstitutionalized population: basic actions difficulty and complex activity limitation (Tables 49, 53, and 54), vision and hearing limitations for adults (Tables 50 and 51), and disability-related information for Medicare enrollees (Table 129), Medicaid recipients (Table 130), and veterans with service-connected disabilities (Table 132). For more information on disability statistics, see Altman and Bernstein (1).

Statistical Significance

All statements in the text describing differences, or lack thereof, in estimates indicate that statistical testing was performed. Differences between two point estimates were determined to be statistically significant at the 0.05 level using two-sided significance tests (z tests). In the text, the standard terminology used when a difference between two point estimates was tested is, ‘‘Between (estimate 1) and (estimate 2).’’ For example, the statement ‘‘Between 2011 and 2012’’ indicates that the difference between the point estimate for 2011 and that for 2012 was tested for statistical significance.

The statistical significance of a time trend was assessed using weighted least squares regression applied to data for all years in the time period. (For a description of the trend testing technique, see the Technical Notes that follow the Chartbook.) The terminology used in the text to indicate testing of a trend is ‘‘During (time period 1) through (time period 2).’’ For example, the statement ‘‘During 2002 through 2012’’ indicates that a statistical test of trend was conducted that included estimates for all 11 years in the time period. Because statistically significant differences or trends are partly a function of sample size (i.e., the larger the sample, the smaller the change that can be detected), statistically significant differences or trends do not necessarily have public health significance (2).

Terms such as ‘‘similar,’’ ‘‘stable,’’and‘‘no difference’’ indicate that the statistics being compared were not significantly different. Lack of comment regarding the difference between statistics does not necessarily suggest that the difference was tested and found to not be significant.

Overall estimates generally have relatively small standard errors, but estimates for certain population subgroups may be based on small numbers and have relatively large standard errors. Although numbers of births and deaths from the Vital Statistics System represent complete counts (except for births in those states where data are based on a 50% sample for selected years) and are not subject to sampling error, the counts are subject to random variation, which means that the number of events that actually occur in a given year may be considered as one of a large series of possible results that could have arisen under the same circumstances. When the number of events is small and the probability of such an event is small, considerable caution must be observed in interpreting the conditions described by the estimates. Estimates that are unreliable because of large standard errors or small numbers of events are noted with an asterisk. The criteria used to designate or suppress unreliable estimates are indicated in the table footnotes.

For NCHS surveys, point estimates and their corresponding variances were calculated using the SUDAAN software package (3), which takes into consideration the complex survey design. Standard errors for other surveys or data sets were computed using the methodology recommended by the programs providing the data or were provided directly by those programs. Standard errors are available for selected tables in the spreadsheet version on the Health, United States website at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

Accessing Health, United States

Health, United States can be accessed in its entirety at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm. The website is a user-friendly resource for Health, United States and related products. In addition to the full report, the website contains the In Brief companion report in PDF format. Also found on the website are data conveniently organized and grouped by topic. The Chartbook figures are provided as PowerPoint slides, and the Trend Tables and Chartbook data tables are provided as spreadsheet files and individual PDFs. Many spreadsheet files include additional years of data not shown in the printed report, along with standard errors where available. Spreadsheet files for selected tables will be updated on the website when new data are available. Visitors to the website can join the Health, United States e-mail list (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/hus_elec...ic_mailing.htm) to receive announcements about release dates and notices of table updates. Previous editions of Health, United States, and their Chartbooks, can also be accessed from the website.

Printed copies of Health, United States can be purchased from the U.S. Government Printing Office at: http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Questions?

If you have questions about Health, United States or related data products, please contact:

Office of Information Services
Information Dissemination Staff
National Center for Health Statistics
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419
Hyattsville, MD 20782
Phone: 1–800-CDC-INFO (1–800–232–4636)
TTY: 1–888–232–6348
Internet: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs
Online request form: http://www.cdc.gov/cdc-info/requestform.html
For e-mail updates on NCHS publication releases, subscribe online at: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/govdelivery.htm.

References

1

Altman B, Bernstein A. Disability and health in the United States, 2001–2005. Hyattsville, MD: NCHS; 2008. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/di...y2001-2005.pdf.

2

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS). Interpretation of YRBS trend data. CDC; 2012. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs...rpretation.pdf.

3

SUDAAN, release 11.0.0 [computer software]. Research Triangle Park, NC: RTI International; 2012.

Acknowledgments

Overall responsibility for planning and coordinating the content of this volume rested with the National Center for Health Statistics’ (NCHS)Office of Analysis and Epidemiology, under the direction of Julia S. Holmes and Irma E. Arispe.

Production of Health, United States, 2013, including highlights, trend tables, and appendixes, was managed by Sheila J. Franco, Virginia M. Freid, and Julia S. Holmes. Trend tables were prepared by Mary Ann Bush, La-Tonya D. Curl, Anne K. Driscoll, Catherine R. Duran, Sheila J. Franco, Virginia M. Freid, Nancy Han, Hashini S. Khajuria, Ji-Eun Kim, Xianfen Li, Naga Shanmugam, and Rashmi Tandon, with assistance from Anita L. Powell and Ilene B. Rosen. The index was assembled by Anita L. Powell. Review and clearance books were assembled by Ilene B. Rosen. Administrative and word processing assistance was provided by Lillie C. Featherstone.

Production of the Chartbook was managed by Sheila J. Franco and Virginia M. Freid. The Special Feature on Prescription Drugs was prepared and written by Sheila J. Franco. Data and analysis for specific charts were provided by Sheila J. Franco, Virginia M. Freid, Hashini S. Khajuria, and Ji-Eun Kim. Charts were drafted by La-Tonya D. Curl. Technical assistance and programming were provided by Mary Ann Bush, La-Tonya D. Curl, Catherine R. Duran, Xianfen Li, Nancy Han, and Rashmi Tandon.

Publication production was performed by CDC/OSELS/ NCHS/OD/Office of Information Services, Information Design and Publishing Staff (IDPS). Project management and editorial review were provided by Barbara J.Wassell. Graphic design was provided by Dorothy M. Day, Odell D. Eldridge (contractor), and Kyung M. Park. Layout and production were done by Jacqueline M. Davis and Zung T. Le. Overview for IDPS publications and electronic products was provided by Christine J. Brown, Kimberly N. Ross, and Tommy C. Seibert, Jr. Printing was managed by Nathanael Brown, CDC/OD/OADC.

Electronic access through the NCHS website was provided by Christine J. Brown, La-Tonya D. Curl, Jacqueline M. Davis, Virginia M. Freid, Elom L. Lawson , Zung T. Le, Anthony Lipphardt, Kyung M. Park, Anita L. Powell, Anthony R. Quintana, Sharon L. Ramirez, Ilene B. Rosen, Naga Shanmugam, and Barbara J.Wassell.

Data and technical assistance were provided by staff of the following NCHS organizations: Division of Health Care Statistics: Michael Albert, Carol J. DeFrances, Chun-Ju Hsiao, Eric Jamoom, Linda F.McCaig, SusanM. Schappert, and Sayeedha Uddin; Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys:Namanjeet Ahluwalia, Margaret D. Carroll,Mark S. Eberhardt, Qiuping Gu, Brian K. Kit, Cynthia L.Ogden, Ryne Paulose-Ram, and Sung Sug (Sarah)Yoon; Division of Health Interview Statistics: Patricia F. Adams,Veronica E. Benson, Debra Blackwell, Barbara Bloom, Tainya Clarke, Robin A. Cohen, Gulnur Freeman, Lindsey Jones, Whitney Kirzinger, Jacqueline Lucas, Michael Martinez, Jeannine Schiller, Charlotte A. Schoenborn, and BrianW.Ward; Division of Vital Statistics: Robert N. Anderson, Elizabeth Arias, Sally C. Curtin, Brady Hamilton, Sharon E. Kirmeyer, Kenneth D. Kochanek, Marian MacDorman, Joyce A.Martin, T.J.Mathews, Sherry L. Murphy, Michelle Osterman, Marie Thoma, Stephanie J. Ventura, Margaret Warner, and Elizabeth Wilson; Office of Analysis and Epidemiology: Lara Akinbami, Li-Hui Chen, Catherine R. Duran, Holly Hedegaard, Deborah D. Ingram, Laura A. Pratt, Cheryl V. Rose, Alan Simon, Ritu Tuteja, and Sirin Yaemsiri; Office of Policy, Budget, and Legislation: Andrea MacKay; Office of the Center Director: Juan Albertorio and Francis C. Notzon; and Office of Research and Methodology: Meena Khare.

Additional data and technical assistance were provided by the following organizations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: Karen Pazol; National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention: Anna Satcher Johnson and Rachel SternWynn; Office of Public Health Scientific Services, Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services: Ruth Ann Jajosky; National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health: Roger Rosa; by the following organizations within the Department of Health and Human Services: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Roxanne Andrews, Kellyn Carper, David Kashihara, and Steven R. Machlin; Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: Mary Carol Barron, Joseph Benson, Aaron Catlin, Cathy Cowan, Maria Diacogiannis, Bridget Dickensheets, Nathan Espinosa, Micah Hartman, Deborah W. Kidd, Barbara S. Klees, David Lassman, Anne Martin, Maggie S. Murgolo, Arun Natarajun, Jason G. Petroski, Joseph F. Regan, Benjamin E.Washington and Lekha Whittle; National Institutes of Health: Brenda Edwards, Missy Jamison, and Marsha Lopez; Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: Joe Gfroerer and Beth Han; and by the following governmental and nongovernmental organizations: U.S. Census Bureau: Bernadette D. Proctor; Bureau of Labor Statistics: Christen Byler and Audrey Watson; Department of Veterans Affairs: Tom Garin, Pheakdey Lim, and Dat Tran; American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy: Jennifer M. Patton; American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine: Lindsey Jurd; American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine: Kelly Foster and Moraith G. North; American Dental Education Association: Sylvia M. Zeno; Association of American Medical Colleges: Geoffrey Redden; Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry: Joanne Zuckerman; Association of Schools of Public Health: Kristin C. Dolinski; Cowles Research Group: C. McKeen Cowles; and NOVA Research Company: Shilpa Bengeri.

List of Chartbook Figures

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents...artbookfigures

Mortality

Figure 1. Life expectancy at birth, by selected characteristics: United States, 1980-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 2. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates: United States, 2000-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 3. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death for all ages, by sex: United States, 2000-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 4. Motor vehicle-related death rates among persons aged 15-24, by sex and age: United States, 2000-2010

  Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Natality

Figure 5. Teenage childbearing, by maternal age and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Morbidity

Figure 6. Respondent-reported heart disease prevalence among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Disability Measures

Figure 7. Basic actions difficulty and complex activity limitation among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Health Risk Factors

Figure 8. Current cigarette smoking among high school seniors and adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 9. Uncontrolled high blood pressure among adults aged 20 and over with hypertension, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 10. Obesity among children and adolescents, by age: United States, 2003-2004 through 2011-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 11. Overweight and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by sex: United States, 1988-1994 through 2009-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Prevention

Figure 12. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination among noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 and over, by type of vaccination and age: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 13. Vaccination coverage among adolescents aged 13-17, by type of vaccine: United States, 2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Health Insurance

Figure 14. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 18-64, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 15. Health insurance coverage among adults aged 19-25, by type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Utilization and Access

Figure 16. One or more emergency department visits in the past 12 months, by age and type of coverage: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 17. No usual source of care among children under age 18, by type of coverage: United States, average annual, 2001-2002 through 2011-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 18. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care or nonreceipt of needed dental care in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Personal Health Care Expenditures

Figure 19. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds: United States, 2001-2011

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

 

Special Feature on Prescription Drugs

Figure 20. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by number of drugs taken and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 21. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by age and selected drug class: United States, 1988-1994 and 2007-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 22. Number of prescription drugs taken in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, 2007-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 23. Nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs in the past 12 months due to cost among adults aged 18-64, by insurance status and percent of poverty level: United States, 2002-2012

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 24. Age-adjusted death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease for all ages, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1990-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 25. Use of prescription antidepressants in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 1988-1994 through 2007-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 26. Antibiotics ordered or provided during emergency department, outpatient, and physician visits for cold symptom diagnoses, by age: United States, average annual, 1995-1996 through 2009-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 27. Computerized systems for prescription drugs, by provider and system type: United States, 2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 28. Drug poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics among persons aged 15 and over, by race and Hispanic origin, sex, and age: United States, 1999-2000 through 2009-2010

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Figure 29. Retail prescription drug expenditures, annual percent change, and spending by payer: United States, 2001-2011

 Microsoft PowerPoint file [PPT - 279 KB]  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 11 MB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

List of Trend Tables

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents...tm#trendtables

Health Status and Determinants

Population

Table 1. Resident population, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 2. Persons below poverty level, by selected characteristics, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1973-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Fertility and Natality

Table 3. Crude birth rates, fertility rates, and birth rates, by age, race, and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1950-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 4. Teenage childbearing, by age and detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 499 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 5. Nonmarital childbearing, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother, and maternal age: United States, selected years 1970-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 6. Low birthweight live births, by detailed race, Hispanic origin, and smoking status of mother: United States, selected years 1970-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 7. Low birthweight live births, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, 2000-2002, 2003-2005, and 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 8. Legal abortions, legal abortion rates, and legal abortion ratios: United States and 46 continuous reporting areas, 2001-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 9. Contraceptive use in the past month among women aged 15-44, by age, race and Hispanic origin, and method of contraception: United States, selected years 1982-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 10. Breastfeeding among mothers aged 15-44, by year of baby's birth and selected characteristics of mother: United States, average annual 1986-1988 through 2005-2007

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Mortality

Table 11. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates, by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, selected years 1983-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 12. Infant mortality rates, by birthweight: United States, selected years 1983-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 13. Infant mortality rates, fetal mortality rates, and perinatal mortality rates, by race: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 14. Infant mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 15. Neonatal mortality rates, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, and state: United States, average annual 1989-1991, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 16. Infant mortality rates and international rankings: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1960-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 17. Life expectancy at birth and at age 65, by sex: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, selected years 1980-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 18. Life expectancy at birth, at age 65, and at age 75, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1900-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 19. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, Hispanic origin, state, and territory: United States and U.S. dependent areas, average annual 1979-1981, 1989-1991, and 2008-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 20. Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 21. Years of potential life lost before age 75 for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1980-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 22. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, 1980 and 2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 23. Leading causes of death and numbers of deaths, by age: United States, 1980 and 2010

 Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 24. Age-adjusted death rates, by race, sex, region, and urbanization level: United States, average annual, selected years 1996-1998 through 2008-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 25. Death rates for all causes, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 26. Death rates for diseases of heart, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 27. Death rates for cerebrovascular diseases, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 28. Death rates for malignant neoplasms, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 29. Death rates for malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lung, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 30. Death rates for malignant neoplasm of breast among females, by race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 31. Death rates for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1987-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 32. Death rates for drug poisoning and drug poisoning involving opioid analgesics, by sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1999-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 33. Death rates for motor vehicle-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 34. Death rates for homicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 35. Death rates for suicide, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1950-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 36. Death rates for firearm-related injuries, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, and age: United States, selected years 1970-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 37. Deaths from selected occupational diseases among persons aged 15 and over: United States, selected years 1980-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 38. Occupational fatal injuries and rates, by industry, sex, age, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1995-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Determinants and Measures of Health

Table 39. Selected notifiable disease rates and number of new cases: United States, selected years 1950-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 40. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnoses, by year of diagnosis and selected characteristics: United States, 2008-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 41. Health conditions among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1999 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 42. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates for selected cancer sites, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1990-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 43. Five-year relative cancer survival rates for selected cancer sites, by race and sex: United States, selected geographic areas, selected years 1975-1977 through 2003-2009

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 44. Respondent-reported prevalence of heart disease, cancer, and stroke among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 45. Number of respondent-reported chronic conditions from 10 selected conditions among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2002-2012

 Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 46. Diabetes prevalence and glycemic control among adults aged 20 and over, by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 47. End-stage renal disease patients, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 48. Severe headache or migraine, low back pain, and neck pain among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 49. Disability measures among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 50. Vision limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 51. Hearing limitations among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2007-2012

 Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 52. Respondent-assessed fair-poor health status, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 53. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 54. Selected measures of disability and health status among adults aged 65 and over, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 55. Serious psychological distress in the past 30 days among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 56. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, and age: United States, selected years 1965-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 57. Age-adjusted prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults aged 25 and over, by sex, race, and education level: United States, selected years 1974-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 58. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 and over, by sex, race, Hispanic origin, age, and education level: United States, average annual, selected years 1990-1992 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 59. Current cigarette smoking among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 60. Use of selected substances in the past month among persons aged 12 and over, by age, sex, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 2002-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 61. Use of selected substances in the past 30 days among high school seniors, 10th graders, and 8th graders, by sex and race: United States, selected years 1980-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 62. Health risk behaviors among students in grades 9-12, by sex, grade level, race, and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1991-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 63. Heavier drinking and drinking five or more drinks in a day among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 64. Selected health conditions and risk factors, by age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 65. Hypertension among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 66. Cholesterol among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2009-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 67. Mean macronutrient intake among adults aged 20 and over, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 68. Participation in leisure-time aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities that meet the federal 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1998-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 69. Healthy weight, overweight, and obesity among adults aged 20 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1960-1962 through 2009-2012

Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 70. Obesity among children and adolescents aged 2-19 years, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1963-1965 through 2009-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 71. Untreated dental caries, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1971-1974 through 2007-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Utilization of Health Resources

Ambulatory Care

Table 72. No usual source of health care among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 73. No usual source of health care among adults aged 18-64, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1993-1994 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 74. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care, nonreceipt of needed prescription drugs, or nonreceipt of needed dental care during the past 12 months due to cost, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 75. Selected measures of access to medical care among adults aged 18-64, by urbanization level and selected characteristics: United States, average annual, 2002-2004 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 76. Delay or nonreceipt of needed medical care during the past 12 months due to cost, by state: 25 most populous states and United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 77. No health care visits to an office or clinic within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, average annual, selected years 1997-1998 through 2011-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 78. Health care visits to doctor offices, emergency departments, and home visits within the past 12 months, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 79. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among children aged 19-35 months, by race, Hispanic origin, poverty level, and location of residence in metropolitan statistical area: United States, selected years 1995-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 80. Vaccination coverage for selected diseases among adolescents aged 13-17, by selected characteristics: United States, 2006-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 81. Influenza vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 82. Pneumococcal vaccination among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1989-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 83. Use of mammography among women aged 40 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 84. Use of Pap smears among women aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 85. Use of colorectal tests or procedures among adults aged 50-75, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 2000-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 86. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among children under age 18, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 87. Emergency department visits within the past 12 months among adults aged 18 and over, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 88. Initial injury-related visits to hospital emergency departments, by sex, age, and intent and mechanism of injury: United States, average annual, selected years 2005-2006 through 2010-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 89. Visits to physician offices, hospital outpatient departments, and hospital emergency departments, by age, sex, and race: United States, selected years 1995-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 90. Visits to primary care generalist and specialty care physicians, by selected characteristics and type of physician: United States, selected years 1980-2010 

 Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 91. Dental visits in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 92. Prescription drug use in the past 30 days, by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 93. Selected prescription drug classes used in the past 30 days, by sex and age: United States, selected years 1988-1994 through 2007-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Inpatient Care

Table 94. Persons with hospital stays in the past year, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1997-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 95. Discharges, days of care, and average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1980 through 2009-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 96. Discharges in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 97. Discharge rate in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 98. Average length of stay in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected first-listed diagnosis: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 99. Discharges with at least one procedure in nonfederal short-stay hospitals, by sex, age, and selected procedures: United States, selected years 1990 through 2009-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 100. Hospital admissions, average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 100. Hospital admissions  average length of stay, outpatient visits, and outpatient surgery, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975–2011

[Data are based on reporting by a census of hospitals]

Type of ownership
and size of hospital
1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011
Admissions
Number, in thousands
               
All hospitals ............... 36,157 38,892 33,774 33,282 34,891 37,006 36,915 36,565
Federal .................  1,913 2,044 1,759 1,559 1,034 952 911 892
Nonfederal 1 .............. 34,243 36,848 32,015 31,723 33,946 36,054 36,004 35,673
Community2 ............ 33,435 36,143 31,181 30,945 33,089 35,239 35,149 34,843
Nonprofit ............. 23,722 25,566 22,878 22,557 24,453 25,881 25,532 25,185
For profit ............. 2,646 3,165 3,066 3,428 4,141 4,618 4,925 5,060
State-local government . . . 7,067 7,413 5,236 4,961 4,496 4,740 4,693 4,598
6–24 beds............ 174 159 95 124 141 186 199 197
25–49 beds ........... 1,431 1,254 870 944 995 1,173 1,169 1,173
50–99 beds ........... 3,675 3,700 2,474 2,299 2,355 2,412 2,173 2,104
100–199 beds ......... 7,017 7,162 5,833 6,288 6,735 6,678 6,125 6,022
200–299 beds ......... 6,174 6,596 6,333 6,495 6,702 7,075 6,569 6,464
300–399 beds ......... 4,739 5,358 5,091 4,693 5,135 6,025 5,835 5,851
400–499 beds ......... 3,689 4,401 3,644 3,413 3,617 3,634 3,869 3,863
500 beds or more ...... 6,537 7,513 6,840 6,690 7,410 8,054 9,210 9,169
Average length of stay 3                
Number of days                
All hospitals ............... 11.4 10.0 9.1 7.8 6.8 6.5 6.2 6.1
Federal ................. 20.3 16.8 14.9 13.1 12.8 11.6 11.8 10.8
Nonfederal 1 .............. 10.8 9.6 8.8 7.5 6.6 6.3 6.1 6.0
Community2 ............ 7.7 7.6 7.2 6.5 5.8 5.6 5.4 5.4
Nonprofit ............. 7.8 7.7 7.3 6.4 5.7 5.5 5.3 5.2
For profit ............ 6.6 6.5 6.4 5.8 5.4 5.3 5.3 5.3
State-local government . . . 7.6 7.3 7.7 7.4 6.7 6.6 6.2 6.2
6–24 beds............ 5.6 5.3 5.4 5.5 4.3 4.2 4.3 4.5
25–49 beds ........... 6.0 5.8 6.1 5.7 5.1 4.9 5.2 5.2
50–99 beds ........... 6.8 6.7 7.2 7.0 6.5 6.4 6.4 6.5
100–199 beds ......... 7.1 7.0 7.1 6.4 5.7 5.6 5.3 5.2
200–299 beds ......... 7.5 7.4 6.9 6.2 5.7 5.3 5.1 5.1
300–399 beds ......... 7.8 7.6 7.0 6.1 5.5 5.4 5.1 5.1
400–499 beds ......... 8.1 7.9 7.3 6.3 5.6 5.5 5.3 5.3
500 beds or more ...... 9.1 8.7 8.1 7.1 6.3 6.0 5.7 5.7
Outpatient visits 4                
Number, in thousands                
All hospitals ............... 254,844 262,951 368,184 483,195 592,673 673,689 750,408 754,454
Federal ................ 51,957 50,566 58,527 59,934 63,402 80,018 90,134 87,975
Nonfederal 1 .............. 202,887 212,385 309,657 423,261 531,972 593,671 660,274 666,479
Community2 ............ 190,672 202,310 301,329 414,345 521,405 584,429 651,424 656,079
Nonprofit ............. 131,435 142,156 221,073 303,851 393,168 441,653 494,178 496,643
For profit ............. 7,713 9,696 20,110 31,940 43,378 46,016 48,201 50,013
State-local government . . . 51,525 50,459 60,146 78,554 84,858 96,760 109,045 109,423
6–24 beds............ 915 1,155 1,471 3,644 4,555 7,970 9,934 10,531
25–49 beds ........... 5,855 6,227 10,812 19,465 27,007 35,172 43,099 45,098
50–99 beds ........... 16,303 17,976 27,582 38,597 49,385 53,382 57,701 56,126
100–199 beds ......... 35,156 36,453 58,940 91,312 114,183 121,053 120,902 120,555
200–299 beds ......... 32,772 36,073 60,561 84,080 99,248 107,332 110,661 109,901
300–399 beds ......... 29,169 30,495 43,699 54,277 73,444 85,366 90,515 95,282
400–499 beds ......... 22,127 25,501 33,394 44,284 52,205 56,023 65,543 66,428
500 beds or more ...... 48,375 48,430 64,870 78,685 101,378 118,131 153,067 152,158
Outpatient surgery                
Percent of total surgeries 5                
Community hospitals 2 ........ -- 16.3 50.5 58.1 62.7 63.3 63.6 64.2


---Data not available.
1 The category of nonfederal hospitals comprises psychiatric, tuberculosis and other respiratory diseases hospitals, and long-term and short-term general and other special hospitals. See Appendix II, Hospital.
2 Community hospitals are nonfederal short-term general and special hospitals whose facilities and services are available to the public. See Appendix II, Hospital.
3 Average length of stay is calculated as the number of inpatient days divided by the number of admissions. See Appendix II, Average length of stay.
4 Outpatient visits include visits to the emergency department, outpatient department, referred visits (pharmacy, EKG, radiology), and outpatient surgery. See Appendix II, Outpatient visit.
5 Total surgeries is a measure of patients with at least one surgical procedure. Persons with multiple surgical procedures during the same outpatient visit or inpatient stay are counted only once. See Appendix II, Outpatient surgery.

SOURCE: American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals. Hospital Statistics, 1976, 1981, 1991–2013 editions. Chicago, IL. (Copyright 1976, 1981, 1991–2013: Used with permission of Health Forum LLC, an affiliate of AHA.) See Appendix I, American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals.​

Health Care Resources

Personnel

Table 101. Active physicians and physicians in patient care, by state: United States, selected years 1975-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 102. Doctors of medicine, by place of medical education and activity: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1975-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 103. Doctors of medicine in primary care, by specialty: United States and outlying U.S. areas, selected years 1949-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 104. Active dentists, by state: United States, selected years 1993-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 105. Healthcare employment and wages, by selected occupations: United States, selected years 2001-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 106. First-year enrollment and graduates of health professions schools, and number of schools, by selected profession: United States, selected academic years 1980-1981 through 2010-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Facilities

Table 107. Hospitals, beds, and occupancy rates, by type of ownership and size of hospital: United States, selected years 1975-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 108. Community hospital beds and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 109. Occupancy rates in community hospitals and average annual percent change, by state: United States, selected years 1970-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]

Table 110. Nursing homes, beds, residents, and occupancy rates, by state: United States, selected years 1995-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 111. Medicare-certified providers and suppliers: United States, selected years 1975-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Health Care Expenditures and Payors

National Health Expenditures

Table 112. Gross domestic product, national health expenditures, per capita amounts, percent distribution, and average annual percent change: United States, selected years 1960-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 113. Consumer Price Index and average annual percent change for all items, selected items, and medical care components: United States, selected years 1960-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 114. National health expenditures, average annual percent change, and percent distribution, by type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 115. Personal health care expenditures, by source of funds and type of expenditure: United States, selected years 1960-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 116. Cost of hospital discharges with common hospital operating room procedures in nonfederal community hospitals, by age and selected principal procedure: United States, selected years 2000-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 117. Expenses for health care and prescribed medicine, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 118. Sources of payment for health care, by selected population characteristics: United States, selected years 1987-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 119. Out-of-pocket health care expenses among persons with medical expenses, by age: United States, selected years 1987-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 120. Expenditures for health services and supplies and percent distribution, by sponsor: United States, selected years 1987-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 121. Employers' costs per employee-hour worked for total compensation, wages and salaries, and health insurance, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1991-2013

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs

Table 122. Private health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 123. Private health insurance coverage obtained through the workplace among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 124. Medicaid coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 125. No health insurance coverage among persons under age 65, by selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1984-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 126. Health insurance coverage of noninstitutionalized Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and over, by type of coverage and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2011

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 127. Medicare enrollees and expenditures and percent distribution, by Medicare program and type of service: United States and other areas, selected years 1970-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 128. Medicare enrollees and program payments among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries, by sex and age: United States and other areas, selected years 1994-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 129. Medicare beneficiaries, by race, Hispanic origin, and selected characteristics: United States, selected years 1992-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 130. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by basis of eligibility, and race and Hispanic origin: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 131. Medicaid beneficiaries and payments, by type of service: United States, selected fiscal years 1999-2010 

 Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 132. Department of Veterans Affairs health care expenditures and use, and persons treated, by selected characteristics: United States, selected fiscal years 1970-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance

Table 133. Medicare enrollees, enrollees in managed care, payment per enrollee, and short-stay hospital utilization, by state: United States, selected years 1994 and 2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 134. Medicaid beneficiaries, beneficiaries in managed care, and payments per beneficiary, by state: United States, selected fiscal years 2000-2010

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

Table 135. Persons without health insurance coverage, by state: United States, average annual, 2003-2005 through 2010-2012

  Adobe PDF file [PDF - 299 KB]  Microsoft Excel file [XLS - 310 KB]

At a Glance Table and Highlights

At a Glance Table

Health, United States, 2013: At a Glance Value (year) Value (year) Value (year) Health, United States,  2013 Figure/Table No.
Life Expectancy and Mortality        
Life Expectancy, in years       Table 18
At birth At birth 76.8 (2000) 78.5 (2009) 78.7 (2010)  
Infant deaths per 1,000 live births       Figure 2/Table 13
All infants 6.91 (2000) 6.39 (2009) 6.15 (2010)  
Deaths per 100,000 population, age-adjusted       Table 20
All causes 869.0 (2000) 749.6 (2009) 747.0 (2010)  
Heart disease 257.6 (2000) 182.8 (2009) 179.1 (2010)  
Cancer 199.6 (2000) 173.5 (2009) 172.8 (2010)  
Chronic lower respiratory diseases 44.2 (2000) 42.7 (2009) 42.2 (2010)  
Stroke 60.9 (2000) 39.6 (2009) 39.1 (2010)  
Unintentional injuries 34.9 (2000) 37.5 (2009) 38.0 (2010)  
Alzheimer’s disease 18.1 (2000) 24.2 (2009) 25.1 (2010)  
Diabetes 25.0 (2000) 21.0 (2009) 20.8 (2010)  
Influenza and pneumonia 23.7 (2000) 16.5 (2009) 15.1 (2010)  
Suicide 10.4 (2000) 11.8 (2009) 12.1 (2010)  
Morbidity and Risk Factors        
Fair or poor health, percent       Table 52
All ages 8.9 (2000) 10.4 (2011) 10.3 (2012)  
65 years and over 26.9 (2000) 24.7 (2011) 22.7 (2012)  
Heart disease (ever told), percent       Table 44
18 years and over 11.3 (2000–2001) 11.8 (2009–2010) 11.4 (2011–2012)  
65 years and over 30.9 (2000–2001) 30.4 (2009–2010) 30.3 (2011–2012)  
Cancer (ever told), percent       Table 44
18 years and over 5.0 (2000–2001) 6.3 (2009–2010) 6.2 (2011–2012)  
65 years and over 15.2 (2000–2001) 18.1 (2009–2010) 18.5 (2011–2012)  
Hypertension, 1 percent       Table 64
20 years and over 28.9 (1999–2000) 31.9 (2009–2010) 32.5 (2011–2012)  
High  serum total cholesterol, 2 percent       Table 64
20 years and over 17.7 (1999–2000) 13.6 (2009–2010) 13.1 (2011–2012)  
Obese, percent       Figure 10/Table 64
Obese, 3 20 years and over 30.3 (1999–2000) 35.9 (2009–2010) 35.1 (2011–2012)  
Obese (BMI at or above sex-and age-specific 95th percentile):        
2–5 years 10.3 (1999–2000) 12.1 (2009–2010) 8.4 (2011–2012)  
6–11 years 15.1 (1999–2000) 18.0 (2009–2010) 17.7 (2011–2012)  
12–19 years 14.8 (1999–2000) 18.4 (2009–2010) 20.5 (2011–2012)  
Cigarette smoking, percent       Table 56
18 years and over 23.2 (2000) 19.0 (2011) 18.1 (2012)  
Health Care Utilization        
No health care visit in past 12 months, percent        
Under 18 years 12.3 (2000) 8.3 (2011) 8.1 (2012)  
18–44 years 23.4 (2000) 23.7 (2011) 24.7 (2012)  
45–64 years 14.9 (2000) 14.6 (2011) 15.1 (2012)  
65 years and over 7.4 (2000) 5.5 (2011) 6.1 (2012)  
Emergency room visit in past 12 months, percent       Tables 86 and 87
Under 18 years 20.3 (2000) 18.5 (2011) 17.8 (2012)  
18–44 years 20.5 (2000) 20.6 (2011) 19.4 (2012)  
45–64 years 17.6 (2000) 18.2 (2011) 18.0 (2012)  
65 years and over 23.7 (2000) 23.3 (2011) 22.2 (2012)  
Dental visit in past year, percent       Table 91
2–17 years 74.1 (2000) 81.4 (2011) 82.3 (2012)  
18–64 years 65.1 (2000) 61.6 (2011) 61.6 (2012)  
65 years and over 56.6 (2000) 61.2 (2011) 61.8 (2012)  
Prescription drug in past 30 days, percent       Figure 20/Table 92
Under 18 years 20.5 (1988–1994) 23.8 (1999–2002) 24.0 (2007–2010)  
18–44 years 31.3 (1988–1994) 35.9 (1999–2002) 38.7 (2007–2010)  
45–64 years 54.8 (1988–1994) 64.1 (1999–2002) 66.2 (2007–2010)  
65 years and over 73.6 (1988–1994) 84.7 (1999–2002) 89.7 (2007–2010)  
Hospitalization in past year, percent       Table 94
18–44 years 7.0 (2000) 6.4 (2011) 6.1 (2012)  
45–64 years 8.4 (2000) 8.3 (2011) 8.0 (2012)  
65 years and over 18.2 (2000) 16.7 (2011) 15.9 (2012)  
Health Insurance and Access to Care        
Uninsured, percent       Table 125
Under 65 years 17.0 (2000) 17.2 (2011) 16.9 (2012)  
Under 18 years 12.6 (2000) 7.0 (2011) 6.6 (2012)  
18–44 years 22.4 (2000) 25.4 (2011) 24.8 (2012)  
19–25 years 32.3 (2000) 27.9 (2011) 26.3 (2012)  
45–64 years 12.6 (2000) 15.4 (2011) 15.6 (2012)  
Delayed or did not receive needed medicalcare in past 12 months due to cost percent       Table 74
Under 18 years 4.6 (2000) 3.8 (2011) 3.2 (2012)  
18–44 years 9.5 (2000) 13.6 (2011) 12.7 (2012)  
45–64 years 8.8 (2000) 14.4 (2011) 14.0 (2012)  
65 years and over 4.5 (2000) 4.6 (2011) 4.1 (2012)  
Health Care Resources        
Health Care Resources Patient care physicians per 10,000 population 4       Table 101
United States 22.7 (2000) 24.0 (2010) 26.1 (2011)  
Highest state 34.4 (MA) (2000) 40.0 (MA) (2010) 41.1 (MA) (2011)  
Lowest state 14.4 (ID) (2000) 17.6 (MS) (2010) 17.7 (ID) (2011)  
Community hospital beds per 1,000 population 5       Table 108
United States 2.9 (2000) 2.6 (2010) 2.6 (2011)  
Highest state 6.0 (ND) (2000) 5.1 (ND) (2010) 5.0 (SD)(2011)  
Lowest state 1.9 (NM, NV, OR, UT, WA) (2000) 1.7 (OR, WA) (2010) 1.7 (WA) (2011)  
Expenditures        
Personal healthcare expenditures, in dollars       Table 115
Total, in trillions $1.2 (2000) $2.2 (2010) $2.3 (2011)  
Per capita $4,128 (2000) $7,090 (2010) $7,326 (2011)  

1 Having measured high blood pressure (systolic pressure of at least 140 mm Hg or diastolic pressure of at least 90 mm Hg) and/or respondent report of taking antihypertensive medication.

2 Having high serum total cholesterol of 240 mg/dL or greater.

3 Obesity is a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30. Height and weight are measured rather than self-reported.

4 Copyright 2013. Used with permission of the American Medical Association.

5 Copyright 2013. Used with permission of Health Forum LLC, an affiliate of the American Hospital Association.

NOTES: Some estimates shown in this table are not shown in the PDF or printed versions but can be found in the spreadsheet version of the cited tables. For more information and the spreadsheet version of the tables, see the complete report, Health, United States, 2013, available from:http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus.htm.

Highlights

Life Expectancy and Mortality

In 2010, life expectancy at birth in the United States for the total population was 78.7 years—76.2 years for males and
81.0 years for females (Table 18).

Between 2000 and 2010, life expectancy at birth increased
2.1 years for males and 1.7 years for females. The gap in life expectancy between males and females narrowed from 5.2 years in 2000 to 4.8 years in 2010 (Table 18).

Between 2000 and 2010, life expectancy at birth increased more for the black than for the white population, thereby narrowing the gap in life expectancy between these two racial groups. In 2000, life expectancy at birth for the white population was 5.5 years longer than for the black population; by 2010, the difference had narrowed to 3.8 years (Table 18).

Between 2000 and 2010, the infant mortality rate decreased 11%, from 6.91 to 6.15 deaths per 1,000 live births. In 2000, the infant mortality rate for white mothers was 5.68, compared with 14.09 for black mothers; by 2010 the infant mortality rate declined to 5.20 among white mothers and
11.63 among black mothers (Table 13).

Between 2000 and 2010, the age-adjusted heart disease death rate decreased 30%, from 257.6 to 179.1 deaths per 100,000 population. In 2010, 24% of all deaths in the United States were from heart disease (Tables 22 and 26).

Between 2000 and 2010, the age-adjusted cancer death rate decreased 13%, from 199.6 to 172.8 deaths per 100,000 population. In 2010, 23% of all deaths in the United States were from cancer (Tables 22 and 28).

Fertility and Natality

Between 2002 and 2012, the birth rate among teenagers aged 15–19 fell 31%, from 42.6 to 29.4 live births per 1,000 females—a record low for the United States (Table 3).

The percentage of low-birthweight births [infants weighing less than 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds) at birth] was 7.99% in 2012, down 3% since 2006 when it was 8.26% (Table 6).

Health Risk Factors

Children

Between 2003–2004 and 2011–2012, the prevalence of obesity among children aged 2–5 years decreased from 14.0% to 8.4% (Table 64 and Figure 10).

The prevalence of obesity among children aged 6–11 was stable between 2003–2004 and 2011–2012. In 2011–2012, 17.7% of children aged 6–11 were obese (Table 64 and Figure 10).

In 2011–2012, 20.5% of adolescents aged 12–19 were obese, which was not significantly different from the prevalence in 2003–2004 (Table 64 and Figure 10).

In 2011, 15.8% of students in grades 9–12 seriously considered suicide, and the percentage was higher among female students (19.3%) than among male students (12.5%) (Table 62).

Adults

In 2012, 20.3% of adults aged 18 and over met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for both aerobic activity and muscle strengthening (Table 68).

Between 1988–1994 and 2009–2012, the percentage of adults aged 20 and over with grade 1 obesity [a body mass index (BMI) of 30.0–34.9] increased from 14.8% to 20.4%. Those with grade 2 obesity (BMI of 35.0–39.9) rose from 5.2% to 8.6%, and those with grade 3 or higher obesity (BMI of 40 or higher) doubled, from 3.0% to 6.3% (percentages are age-adjusted) (Table 69).

In 2012, 18.1% of adults aged 18 and over were current cigarette smokers, a decline from 2000 (23.2%). Men were more likely than women to be current cigarette smokers (20.5% compared with 15.8%) in 2012 (Table 56).

Measures of Health and Disease Prevalence

In 2010–2012, 5.5% of children under age 18 had an asthma attack in the past year, and 5.2% had a food allergy (Table 41).

Among children aged 5–17, 9.9% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 5.8% had serious emotional or behavioral difficulties in 2010–2012 (Table 41).

In 2012, the percentage of noninstitutionalized adults who reported their health as fair or poor ranged from 6.4% of those aged 18–44 to 26.6% of those aged 75 and over (Table 52).

In 2012, 26.2% of noninstitutionalized adults aged 18–64 reported a disability (defined as any basic actions difficulty or complex activity limitation), compared with 58.7% of those aged 65 and over (Table 49).

In 2011–2012, among noninstitutionalized adults aged 75 and over, 43.5% of men and 31.5% of women had ever been told by a physician or other health professional that they had heart disease (Table 44 and Figure 6).

In 2011–2012, among noninstitutionalized adults aged 75 and over, 24.7% of men and 19.3% of women had ever been told by a physician or other health professional that they had cancer (excluding squamous and basal cell skin cancers) (Table 44).

In 2009–2012, nearly one-half (47%) of adults aged 20 and over with hypertension continued to have uncontrolled high blood pressure (Table 65 and Figure 9).

Health Care Utilization

Use of Health Care Services

In 2012, 15.7% of persons had no health care visits in the past year, 47.3% had 1–3 health care visits, 24.0% had 4–9 visits, and 13.1% had 10 or more visits. Health care visits for illness, preventive care, or an injury include visits to see a health care provider at physician offices, emergency departments, clinics or some other place, and home visits by health care professionals (Table 78).

In 2011, there were 126 million visits to hospital outpatient departments and 136 million visits to hospital emergency departments (Table 89).

In 2012, 82.3% of children aged 2–17 years, 61.6% of adults aged 18–64, and 61.8% of adults aged 65 and over had visited a dentist in the past year (Table 91).

The percentage of the population taking at least one prescription drug during the past 30 days increased from 39.1% in 1988–1994 to 47.5% in 2007–2010. During the same period, the percentage taking three or more prescription drugs rose from 11.8% to 20.8%, and the percentage taking five or more drugs more than doubled, from 4.0% to 10.1% (percentages are age-adjusted) (Table 92 and Figure 20).

Use of Preventive Medical Care Services

In 2012, 68% of children aged 19–35 months had completed a combined series of childhood vaccinations (at least 4 doses of diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis vaccine, 3 doses of polio vaccine, 1 dose of measles-containing vaccine, 3 or 4 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine depending on product type, 3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine, 1 dose of varicella vaccine, and 4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) (Table 79).

In 2012, 37.7% of noninstitutionalized adults aged 18 and over had received an influenza vaccination in the past year. Influenza vaccination increased with age, with 26.3% of those aged 18–49, 42.8% of those aged 50–64, and 66.5% of those aged 65 and over reporting an influenza vaccination in the past year (Table 81 and Figure 12).

In 2012, 59.9% of noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 and over ever had a pneumococcal vaccination (Table 82 and Figure 12).

Nonreceipt of Needed Medical Care, Prescription Drugs, and Dental Care Due to Cost

Between 2002 and 2012, among adults aged 18–64, the percentage who reported not receiving or delaying seeking needed medical care due to cost in the past 12 months increased from 9.7% to 13.3%. The percentage not receiving needed prescription drugs due to cost increased from 7.6% to 9.4%, and the percentage not receiving needed dental care due to cost grew from 10.4% to 14.8% (Table 74).

In 2012, 33.0% of adults aged 18–64 who were uninsured during the past 12 months did not get or delayed seeking needed medical care due to cost in the past 12 months, compared with 6.6% of adults aged 18–64 who were insured continuously during the past 12 months (Table 74).

Health Care Resources

In 2011, there were 26.1 physicians in patient care per 10,000 population in the United States. The number of patient care physicians per 10,000 population ranged from 17.7 in Idaho to 41.1 in Massachusetts and 68.3 in the District of Columbia (Table 101).

In 2011, the United States had 4,973 community hospitals and 797,403 community hospital beds. Community hospital occupancy averaged 64.3% in 2011, similar to the level in 2010 (Table 107).

In 2012, there were 15,673 certified nursing homes with 1,703,213 nursing home beds. Nursing home occupancy averaged 81.2% in 2012. Nursing home occupancy ranged from 60.0% in Oregon to 91.9% in Rhode Island and 94.1% in the District of Columbia (Table 110).

Health Care Expenditures and Payers

Health Care Expenditures

In 2011, personal health care expenditures in the United States totaled $2.3 trillion, a 4.1% increase from 2010. The average per capita personal health care expenditure for the total U.S. population was $7,326 in 2011 (Table 112).

Expenditures for hospital care accounted for 31.5% of all national health care expenditures in 2011. Physician and clinical services accounted for 20.0% of the total, prescription drugs for 9.7%, and nursing care facilities and continuing care retirement communities for 5.5% (Table 114).

In 2011, prescription drug expenditures totaled $263 billion, a 2.9% increase from 2010 (Table 114).
In 2011, the average cost for the entire hospitalization involving a heart valve procedure was $53,282, a coronary artery bypass graft procedure was $38,707, cardiac pacemaker insertion or replacement was $33,194, and spinal fusion was $27,570 (Table 116).

Health Care Payers

In 2011, 34.5% of all personal health care expenditures were paid by private health insurance, 22.9% were paid by Medicare and 16.4% by Medicaid; consumers paid 13.5% out of pocket; and the remainder was paid by other types of insurance, payers, and programs (Table 115).

In 2010, children under age 21 accounted for 48.3% of Medicaid recipients but only 19.8% of Medicaid expenditures. Aged, blind, and persons with disabilities accounted for 20.8% of Medicaid recipients and 62.8% of Medicaid expenditures (Table 130).
In 2012, the Medicare program had 50.7 million enrollees and expenditures of $574.2 billion, up from $549.1 billion the previous year. Expenditures for the Medicare drug program (Part D) were $66.9 billion in 2012 (Table 127).

Health Insurance Coverage

My Note: This section was omitted in the Contents (page IX in he PDF) 

Between 2002 and 2012, the percentage of the population under age 65 with private health insurance obtained through the workplace declined from 65.3% to 56.9% (Table 123).

In 2012, 6.6% of children under age 18 and 20.9% of adults aged 18–64 had no health insurance coverage (public or private) at the time of interview (Table 125).

Between 2002 and 2012, among children in families with income just above the poverty level (100%–199% of poverty), the percentage of uninsured children under age 18 dropped from 17.0% to 10.4%, while the percentage with coverage through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) increased from 38.6% to 57.3% (Tables 124 and 125).

Between 2010 and 2012, the percentage of adults aged 19–25 who were uninsured decreased from 33.8% to 26.3% (Table 125 and Figure 15).

Chartbook With Special Feature on Prescription Drugs

Mortality

Life Expectancy at Birth

My Note: Link goes to Web Page: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents2013.htm#fig01 It could be internal to this page and be faster! I could reproduce the left-most and right-most grapha from Table 18 reformatted for Spotfire.

 

HUS2013Figure1.png

The gap in life expectancy at birth between white persons and black persons persists but has narrowed since 1990.

Life expectancy is a measure often used to gauge the overall health of a population. Between 1980 and 2010, life expectancy at birth in the United States increased from 70.0 years to 76.2 years for males and from 77.4 years to 81.0 years for females. Racial disparities in life expectancy at birth persisted for both males and females in 2010 but have narrowed since 1990 (1). Life expectancy at birth was 8.2 years longer for white males than for black males in 1990, and 4.7 years longer for white males than for black males in 2010. In 1990, life expectancy at birth was 5.8 years longer for white females than for black females; by 2010, life expectancy at birth was 3.3 years longer for white females than for black females. In 2010, Hispanic males and females had longer life expectancy at birth than non-Hispanic white or non-Hispanic black males and females.
NOTE: Life expectancy by Hispanic origin was available starting in 2006.
SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, Health, United States, 2013, Table 18.
Data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS).

Excel and PowerPoint: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/contents2013.htm#fig01

Infant Mortality

Selected Causes of Death

Motor Vehicle-related Death Rates

Natality

Teenage Childbearing

Morbidity

Heart Disease Prevalence

Disability Measures

Basic Actions Difficulty and Complex Activity Limitation

Health Risk Factors

Current Cigarette Smoking

Uncontrolled High Blood Pressure

Obesity Among Children

Overweight and Obesity Among Adults

Prevention

Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination

Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents Aged 13–17

Health Insurance

Coverage Among Adults Aged 18–64

Coverage Among Adults Aged 19–25

Utilization and Access

Emergency Department Use

Usual Source of Care Among Children

Delay or Nonreceipt of Medical Care or​ Nonreceipt of Dental Care Due to Cost

Personal Health Care Expenditures

Major Source of Funds

Special Feature on Prescription Drugs

Introduction

Prescription Drug Use

Prescription Drug Use by Drug Class

Polypharmacy

Nonreceipt of Needed Prescription Drugs

Due to Cost

Deaths from HIV Disease

Use of Antidepressants

Antibiotics Prescribed for Colds

Computerized Systems for Prescription Drugs

Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics

Spending on Prescription Drugs

Data Tables for Special Feature

Technical Notes

My Note: Need to add links?

Data Sources and Comparability

Data for the Health, United States, 2013 Chartbook come from many surveys and data systems and cover a broad range of years. Detailed descriptions of the data sources included in the Chartbook are provided in Appendix I. Additional information clarifying and qualifying the data are included in the table notes and in Appendix II. Definitions and Methods.

Data Presentation

Many measures in the Chartbook are shown for people in specific age groups because of the strong effect of age on most health outcomes. Some estimates are age-adjusted using the age distribution of the 2000 standard population; where this has been done, it is noted in the data tables that accompany the charts. Age-adjusted rates are computed to eliminate differences in observed rates that result from age differences in population composition (see Appendix II, Age adjustment). For some charts, data years are combined to increase sample size and the reliability of the estimates. Some charts present time trends, and others focus on differences in estimates among population subgroups for the most recent time point available. Trends are generally shown on a linear scale to emphasize absolute differences over time. The time trends for the overall mortality measures are shown on a logarithmic (log) scale to emphasize the rate of change and to enable measures with large differences in magnitude to be shown on the same chart. Point estimates and standard errors for Figures 1–19 are available in the Trend Table and Excel spreadsheet specified in the Note below the chart. Data tables with point estimates and standard errors (when appropriate) accompany Figures 20–29. Some data tables contain additional data that were not graphed because of space considerations.

Statistical Testing

Data trends can be described in many ways. For trend analyses presented in the Chartbook, increases or decreases in the estimates over time are measured by the annual percent change using the weighted least squares regression method. Statistically significant changes in the trend are assessed at the 0.05 level using the National Cancer Institute’s Joinpoint software. For more information on Joinpoint, see: http://surveillance.cancer.gov/joinpoint/. For analyses that compare two time periods, differences between the two periods were assessed for statistical significance at the 0.05 level using two-sided significance tests (z-tests).

Terms such as ‘‘similar,’’ ‘‘stable,’’ and ‘‘no difference’’ used in the text indicate that the statistics being compared were not significantly different. Lack of comment regarding the difference between statistics does not necessarily suggest that the difference was tested and found to be not significant. Because statistically significant differences or trends are partly a function of sample size (the larger the sample, the smaller the change that can be detected), they do not necessarily have public health significance (81)). Testing and comparisons use the estimates and standard errors in the trend and data tables, not the rounded estimates shown in the charts.

Overall estimates generally have relatively small sampling errors, but estimates for certain population subgroups may be based on small numbers and have relatively large sampling errors. Numbers of deaths obtained from the National Vital Statistics System represent complete counts and therefore are not subject to sampling error. They are, however, subject to random variation, which means that the number of events that actually occur in a given year may be considered as one of a large series of possible results that could have arisen under the same circumstances.When the number of events is small and the probability of such an event is small, considerable caution must be observed in interpreting the conditions described by the charts. Estimates that are unreliable because of large sampling errors or small numbers of events have been noted with an asterisk. The criteria used to designate or suppress unreliable estimates are indicated in the notes to the applicable tables or charts.

For NCHS surveys, point estimates and their corresponding variances were calculated using the SUDAAN software package, which takes into consideration the complex survey design (82). Standard errors for other surveys or data sets were computed using the methodology recommended by the programs providing the data, or were provided directly by those programs.

Survey Questions and Coding

Additional information on data used in the Special Feature, including exact wording of questions and coding schemes, is detailed below.

Figures 20–22 and 25. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) questionnaire administered to all participants included a question on whether they had taken a prescription drug in the past 30 days [RXDUSE]. Those who answered ‘‘yes’’ were asked to show the interviewer the medication containers for all the prescriptions. For each drug reported, the interviewer entered the product's complete name from the container. If no container was available, the interviewer asked the participant to verbally report the name of the drug. Only prescriptions the respondent themselves took are included. Prescriptions administered in other health care settings, such as physician offices and hospital outpatient departments, are not collected. Over-the-counter drugs play an important role in health care, but most of the analysis in this feature focuses only on prescription drugs.

More information on prescription drug data collection and coding in NHANES is available from: http://www.cdc.gov/ nchs/nhanes/nhanes1999-2000/RXQ_DRUG.htm. Also see Appendix I, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; Appendix II, Drug. Figure 21. Data are from NHANES and are based on prescription drugs the respondent reported taking in the past 30 days. For each drug reported, the interviewer entered the product's complete name from the container and the drug was categorized into therapeutic classes. Drug classes cited are from Lexicon Plus (Cerner Multum, Denver, CO), a proprietary comprehensive database of all prescription and some nonprescription drug products available in the U.S. drug market.

  • The category antiasthmatics includes one or more asthma drugs, including bronchodilators, mast cell stabilizers, inhaled corticosteroids, mucolytics, inhaled antiinfectives, leukotriene modifiers, and antiasthmatic combinations (level 2, class 125, 130, 131, or 243).
  • The category antibiotics includes one or more antibiotic drugs, including antituberculosis agents, cephalosporins, leprostatics, macrolide derivatives, miscellaneous antibiotics, penicillins, quinolones, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, urinary anti-infectives, aminoglycosides, lincomycin derivatives, and glycopeptide antibiotics (level 2, class 6, 8–18, 240, 315, or 406).
  • The category central nervous system stimulants includes one or more central nervous system stimulants (level 2, class 71).
  • The category analgesics includes one or more analgesic drugs (level 2, class 58).
  • The category antidepressants includes one or more antidepressant drugs (level 2, class 249).
  • The category cardiovascular agents includes one or more cardiovascular agents, agents for hypertensive emergencies, ACE inhibitors, peripherally acting antiadrenergic agents, centrally acting antiadrenergic agents, antianginal agents, antiarrhythmic agents, beta-adrenergic blocking agents, calcium channel blocking agents, diuretics, inotropic agents, miscellaneous cardiovascular agents, peripheral vasodilators, vasodilators, vasopressors, antihypertensive combinations, angiotensin II inhibitors, agents for pulmonary hypertension, aldosterone receptor antagonists, renin inhibitors, anticholinergic chronotropic agents, and catecholamines (level 1, class 40).
  • The category cholesterol-lowering drugs includes one or more antihyperlipidemic drugs (level 2, class 19).
  • The category anti-acid reflux drugs includes one or more proton pump inhibitors or H2 antagonists (level 2, class 94 or 272).
  • The category antidiabetic agents includes one or more antidiabetic drugs (level 2, class 99).
  • The category anticoagulants includes one or more anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents (level 2, class 82 or 83).

Figure 23. Data are from National Health Interview Survey and are based on adults responding to the question, ‘‘During the past 12 months was there any time when you needed prescription medicine but didn't get it because [person] couldn't afford it?’’ [AHCAFYR1]. Survey respondents may be covered by health insurance at the time of interview but may have experienced one or more lapses in coverage during the 12 months prior to interview. To be consistent with the 12-month period used to determine prescription drug access issues, insurance status during the prior 12 months was used. Insurance status during the prior 12 months was determined using two questions: (a) all persons without a known comprehensive health insurance plan were asked, ‘‘About how long has it been since [person] last had health care coverage?’’ [HILAST]; and (b) all persons with known health insurance coverage were asked, ‘‘In the past 12 months, was there any time when [person] did NOT have ANY health insurance coverage?’’ [HINOTYR]. Also see Appendix II, Health insurance coverage.

Figure 26. Data are from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: Emergency Department and Outpatient Components. The following drugs codes were used to identify antibiotics: 00007, 00009, 00028, 00062, 00103, 00125, 00194, 00340, 00345, 00349, 00391, 01017, 01044, 01046, 01053, 01054, 01189, 01196, 01242, 01315, 01630, 01635, 01640, 01685, 01865, 02047, 02070, 02102, 02116, 02146, 02161, 02987, 03059, 03081, 03109, 03138, 03220, 03283, 03331, 03425, 03430, 03741, 04156, 04157, 04180,0 04235, 04240, 04264, 04528, 04531, 04586, 05117, 05156, 05190, 05207, 05232, 05233, 05245, 05690, 05955, 05983, 05985, 05988, 05993, 05995, 06097, 06125, 06127, 06128, 06130, 06131, 06133, 06162, 06196, 06204, 06224, 06238, 06839, 06883, 06963, 07015, 07067, 07561, 07888, 08030, 08081, 08113, 08130, 08132, 08150, 08252, 08268, 08373, 08468, 08496, 08557, 08574, 08640, 09182, 09379, 09433, 09569, 09611, 09752, 09846, 09878, 09892, 10340, 10350, 10355, 10363, 10364, 10705, 10800, 10820, 10845, 10875, 10905, 11553, 11651, 11655, 11657, 11658, 11660, 11665, 11667, 11669, 11905, 12967, 13350, 13355, 15490, 15495, 16472, 16475, 16480, 16482, 16485, 17150, 17270, 18325, 18645, 19050, 19263, 19460, 19465, 19698, 20140, 20175, 20215, 20218, 20490, 21250, 21385, 21795, 22233, 22328, 22340, 22670, 22935, 23047, 23125, 23150, 23185, 23195, 23215, 23220, 23221, 23222, 23223, 23225, 23228, 23230, 23305, 23500, 23603, 23605, 24228, 24435, 24440, 24465, 24848, 25070, 25075, 25130, 25575, 26460, 26795, 26800, 26825, 26940, 26960, 27835, 27840, 28205, 28258, 28260, 28280, 28285, 28320, 29078, 29315, 29838, 29843, 29888, 29897, 30025, 30035, 30575, 30725, 30850, 31020, 31045, 31050, 31055, 31060, 31075, 31645, 31650, 31870, 32020, 32423, 32430, 33068, 33092, 33155, 33355, 33400, 33410, 33425, 33430, 33780, 33805, 34085, 34090, 34950, 34970, 34975, 34990, 35595, 40310, 41785, 50036, 60115, 60120, 60125, 60295, 60335, 60485, 60500, 60505, 60780, 61085, 61185, 61295, 61410, 61415, 61470, 89015, 89027, 89028, 89029, 89059, 89075, 89076, 91015, 91017, 91059, 91067, 91068, 91069, 91070, 91094, 92004, 92006, 92013, 92029, 92031, 92109, 92110, 92111, 92112, 92140, 93038, 93088, 93093, 93098, 93166, 93179, 93214, 93230, 93301, 93303, 93338, 93360, 93387, 93416, 93417, 94037, 94129, 94139, 94146, 94169, 95028, 95037, 95149, 95167, 95187, 96070, 96087, 97001, 97004, 97045, 97132, 97163, 98029, 98040, 98061, 98066, 98082, 99001, 99014, 99022, 99073, 99135.

Figure 27. Data are from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: Outpatient (NHAMCS–OPD) and Emergency Department (NHAMCS–ED) Components, and the National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF).

Data from NAMCS, NHAMCS–OPD, and NHAMCS–ED were based on the following questions about the four types of computerized systems. The variable names are in this order: NAMCS, NHAMCS–OPD, NHAMCS–ED. If the provider reported that they had the system but it was turned off, they were classified as not having that computer system type. If the response was unknown, blank, or otherwise missing, the record was excluded from the analysis. Missing values can be handled in a variety of ways. Estimates in Health, United States may differ from other estimates based on the same data presented elsewhere if missing values were handled differently.

  • Ordering prescriptions: ‘‘Does your practice have a computerized system for orders for prescriptions?’’ [ECPOE, ECPOEO, ECPOEE]. Six percent of physician offices, 6% of hospital OPDs, and 5% of hospital EDs had their ordering prescriptions systems turned off and were counted as not having an ordering prescriptions system.
  • Warning of drug interactions and contraindications: ‘‘If practice has a computerized system for orders for prescriptions, are there warnings of drug interactions or contraindications provided?’’ Providers who did not have a system for ordering prescriptions or had it turned off (prior question) were not asked this question and were classified as not having a warning system [EWARN, EWARNO, EWARNE].
  • Submitting prescriptions electronically to pharmacy: ‘‘If practice has a computerized system for orders for prescriptions, are prescriptions sent electronically to pharmacy?’’ Providers who did not have a system for ordering prescriptions or had it turned off (prior question) were not asked this question and were classified as not having a system to submit prescriptions electronically [ESCRIP, EESCRIPO, EESCRIPE].
  • Including patient's allergies and current medications (in clinical notes system): Based on two questions, ‘‘If practice has a computerized system for clinical notes, do they include a comprehensive list of the patient's allergies (including allergies to medication)?’’ and ‘‘If practice has a computerized system for clinical notes, do they include a list of medications that the patient is taking?’’ Only providers with ‘‘Yes’’ to both questions were counted as having a system recording patient's allergies and medications. Providers who did not have a system for clinical notes or had it turned off (prior question) were not asked these questions and were classified as not having a system to record allergies and medications electronically [EMEDS, EMEDSO, EMEDSE, and EALLERG, EALLERGO, EALLERGE]. Five percent of physician offices, 4% of hospital OPDs, and less than 1% of hospital EDs had their clinical notes systems turned off and were counted as not having a patient's allergies or medications system.

Data from NSRCF were based on the following questions about the four types of computerized systems. Providers were shown a card with a list of computer systems and asked which types their facility had. If the response was unknown, blank, or otherwise missing, the record was excluded from the analysis.

  • Ordering prescriptions: ‘‘Does this facility have the following computerized capabilities? ORDERS FOR PRESCRIPTIONS?’’ [ITPRESC].
  • Warning of drug interactions and contraindications: ‘‘Does this facility have the following computerized capabilities?WARNING OF DRUG INTERACTIONS OR CONTRAINDICATIONS?’’ [ITCONTRA].
  • Submitting prescriptions electronically to pharmacy: ‘‘Does this facility's computerized system support electronic health information exchange with PHARMACY?’’ [ITPHARM].
  • Including patient's allergies and current medications (in clinical notes system): Based on two questions: ‘‘Does this facility have the following computerized capabilities? MAINTAINING ACTIVE MEDICATION ALLERGY LIST?’’ and ‘‘Does this facility have the following computerized capabilities? MAINTAINING LIST OF RESIDENT'S MEDICATIONS?’’ [ITRXLIST and ITALLERG].

Figure 28. Propoxyphene was withdrawn from the market in 2010. However, because the chart includes data back to 2000, propoxyphene is included in the list of synthetic drugs.

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Trend Tables

Health Status and Determinants

Population

Fertility and Natality

Mortality

Determinants and Measures of Health

Utilization of Health Resources

Ambulatory Care

Inpatient Care

Health Care Resources

Personnel

Facilities

Health Care Expenditures and Payers

National Health Expenditures

Health Care Coverage and Major Federal Programs

State Health Expenditures and Health Insurance

Appendixes

Appendix Contents

Appendix I. Data Sources

Introduction

Health, United States consolidates the most current data on the health of the population of the United States, the availability and use of health resources, and health care expenditures. Information was obtained from the data files and published reports of many federal government, private, and global agencies and organizations. In each case, the sponsoring agency or organization collected data using its own methods and procedures. Therefore, data in this report may vary considerably with respect to source, method of collection, definitions, and reference period.

Although a detailed description and comprehensive evaluation of each data source are beyond the scope of this appendix, readers should be aware of the general strengths and weaknesses of the different data collection systems shown in Health, United States. For example, population-based surveys obtain socioeconomic data, data on family characteristics, and information on the impact of an illness, such as days lost from work or limitation of activity. These data are limited by the amount of information a respondent remembers or is willing to report. For example, a respondent may not know detailed medical information, such as a precise diagnosis or the type of procedure performed, and therefore cannot report that information. In contrast, records-based surveys, which collect data from physician and hospital records, usually contain good diagnostic information but little or no information about the socioeconomic characteristics of individuals or the impact of illnesses on individuals.

Different data collection systems may cover different populations, and understanding these differences is critical to interpreting the resulting data. Data on vital statistics and national expenditures cover the entire population. However, most data on morbidity cover only the civilian noninstitutionalized population and thus may not include data for military personnel, who are usually young; for institutionalized people, including the prison population, who may be of any age; or for nursing home residents, who are usually older.

All data collection systems are subject to error, and records may be incomplete or contain inaccurate information. Respondents may not remember essential information, a question may not mean the same thing to different respondents, and some institutions or individuals may not respond at all. It is not always possible to measure the magnitude of these errors or their effect on the data.Where possible, table notes describe the universe and method of data collection, to assist users in evaluating data quality.

Some information is collected in more than one survey, and estimates of the same statistic may vary among surveys because of different survey methodologies, sampling frames, questionnaires, definitions, and tabulation categories. For example, cigarette use is measured by the National Health Interview Survey, the National Survey on Drug Use & Health, the Monitoring the Future Study, and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey. These surveys use slightly different questions, cover persons of differing ages, and interview in diverse settings (e.g., at school compared with at home), so estimates will differ.

Overall estimates generally have relatively small sampling errors, but estimates for certain population subgroups may be based on a small sample size and have relatively large sampling errors. Numbers of births and deaths from the National Vital Statistics System represent complete counts (except for births in those states where data are based on a 50% sample for certain years). Therefore, these data are not subject to sampling error. However, when the figures are used for analytical purposes, such as the comparison of rates over a period, the number of events that actually occurred may be considered as one of a large series of possible results that could have arisen under the same circumstances.When the number of events is small and the probability of such an event is rare, estimates may be unstable, and considerable caution must be used in interpreting the statistics. Estimates that are unreliable because of large sampling errors or small numbers of events are noted with asterisks in tables, and the criteria used to determine unreliable estimates are indicated in an accompanying footnote.

In this appendix, government data sources are listed alphabetically by data set name, and private and global sources are listed separately. To the extent possible, government data systems are described using a standard format. The Overview is a brief, general statement about the purpose or objectives of the data system. The Selected Content section lists major data elements that are collected or estimated using interpolation or modeling. The Data Years section gives the years the survey or data system has existed or been fielded. The Coverage section describes the population that the data system represents: for example, residents of the United States, the noninstitutionalized population, persons in specific population groups, or other entities that make up the survey. The Methodology section presents a short description of the methods used to collect the data. The Sample Size and Response Rate section provides these statistics for surveys. The Issues Affecting Interpretation section describes major changes in the data collection methodology or other factors that must be considered when analyzing trends: for example, a major survey redesign that may introduce a discontinuity in the trend. For additional information about the methodology, data files, and history of a data source, consult the References and For More Information sections that follow each summary.

Government Sources

Abortion Surveillance System

CDC/National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP)

Overview

The Abortion Surveillance System documents the number and characteristics of women obtaining legal induced abortions, monitors teenage and unintended pregnancy, and assists in efforts to identify and reduce preventable causes of morbidity and mortality associated with abortions.

Selected Content

System content includes age, race, ethnicity, marital status, previous live births, period of gestation, and previous induced abortions among women obtaining legal induced abortions.

Data Years

Each year, CDC requests abortion data from the central health agencies of 52 reporting areas (the 50 states, D.C., and New York City). This information is provided voluntarily to CDC and has been presented in Health, United States, 2013 from 2001 onward. Two measures are presented in this table: the total number of abortions excluding the states which did not report for that particular year; and the 46 states which reported continuously for 2001–2010 (the six states which did not report continuously for the period 2001–2010 include: Alaska, California, Louisiana, Maryland, New Hampshire, and West Virginia). The following states did not report abortion data to CDC on an annual basis: in 2001–2002, Alaska, California, and New Hampshire; in 2003 and 2004, California, New Hampshire, and West Virginia; in 2005 and 2006, California, Louisiana, and New Hampshire; in 2007 and 2008, California, Maryland, and New Hampshire; in 2009 and 2010, California, Maryland, and New Hampshire.

Coverage

The system includes women of all ages, including adolescents, who obtain legal induced abortions.
Methodology. Each year, CDC requests tabulated data to document the number and characteristics of women obtaining abortions in the United States. For the purpose of surveillance, a legal induced abortion is defined as an intervention performed by a licensed clinician (e.g., a physician, nurse-midwife, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) that is intended to terminate a suspected or known ongoing intrauterine pregnancy and produce a nonviable fetus at any gestational age.

In most states, collection of abortion data is facilitated by the legal requirement for hospitals, facilities, and physicians to report abortions to a central health agency. These central health agencies voluntarily provide CDC the aggregate numbers for the abortion data they have collected. Although reporting to CDC is voluntary, most reporting areas provide aggregate abortion numbers; during 2001– 2010, a total of 46 reporting areas provided CDC a continuous annual record of abortion numbers.

Issues Affecting Interpretation

The findings in this report are subject to several limitations. First, because reporting requirements are established by the individual reporting areas, the collection of data varies, and CDC is unable to obtain the total number of abortions performed in the United States. During the period covered by this report, the total annual number of abortions recorded by CDC was 65%–69% of the number recorded by the Guttmacher Institute, which uses numerous active follow-up techniques to increase the completeness of the data obtained through its periodic national census of abortion providers. Although most reporting areas collect and send abortion data to CDC, this information is given to CDC voluntarily. During 2001– 2010, 6 of the 52 reporting areas did not provide CDC with data on a consistent annual basis. As a result, the abortion numbers these areas report to CDC are incomplete. Moreover, even in states that legally require medical providers to submit a report for all the abortions they perform, enforcement of this requirement varies.

Second, because reporting requirements are established by the individual reporting areas, many states have developed reporting forms that do not resemble the template CDC created for technical guidance. Consequently, many reporting areas do not collect all the information CDC compiles on the characteristics of women obtaining abortions (e.g., age, race, and ethnicity).

Third, abortion data are compiled and reported to CDC by the central health agency of the reporting area in which the abortion was performed rather than the reporting area in which the woman lived. This overcounts abortion statistics for reporting areas in which a high percentage of abortions are obtained by out-of-state residents and undercounts abortions for states with limited abortion services, more stringent legal requirements for obtaining an abortion, or geographic proximity to services in another state.

Finally, adjustments for socioeconomic status cannot be made because CDC does not collect abortion data by education or income, and joint analysis of many variables of interest (e.g., age, race, and ethnicity) is precluded because reporting areas provide CDC with aggregate numbers rather than individual-level records.

Reference

Pazol K, Creanga AA, Burley KD, Hayes B, Jamieson DJ.Abortion surveillance—United States, 2010. MMWR Surveill Summ 2013;62(SS–08):1–44. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwr...cid=ss6208a1_e.

For More Information

See the NCCDPHP surveillance and research website at: http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealt...tats/index.htm.

Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)
Consumer Price Index (CPI)
Current Population Survey (CPS)
Department of Veterans Affairs National Enrollment and Patient Databases
Employee Benefits Survey—See Appendix I, National Compensation Survey (NCS).
Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), Nationwide Inpatient Sample
Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS)
Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)
Medicare Administrative Data
Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS)
Monitoring the Future (MTF) Study
National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)
National Compensation Survey (NCS)
National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA)
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
National HIV Surveillance System
National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)
National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS)
National Immunization Survey (NIS)
National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA)
National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES)—See Appendix I, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS).
National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System (NNDSS)
National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG)
National Survey of Residential Care Facilities (NSRCF)
National Survey on Drug Use & Health (NSDUH)
National Vital Statistics System (NVSS)
Birth File
Fetal Death Data Set
Mortality File
Multiple Cause-of-Death File
Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set
Compressed Mortality File (CMF)
Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)
Population Census and Population Estimates
Decennial Census
Race Data on the 1990 Census
Race Data on the 2000 Census
Race Data on the 2010 Census
Modified Decennial Census Files
Postcensal Population Estimates
Intercensal Population Estimates
Bridged-race Population Estimates
Quality Improvement Evaluation System (QIES)
Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Surveillance
Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER)
United States Renal Data System (USRDS)
Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)

Private and Global Sources

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM)
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP)
American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine (AACPM)
American Dental Association (ADA)
American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey of Hospitals
American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile
American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)
Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO)
Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH)
Guttmacher Institute Abortion Provider Census
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Data

Appendix II. Definitions and Methods

Introduction

My Note: There are links for these Tables to the actual Tables. Why not put the Tables right below, instead of at the end?

This appendix contains an alphabetical listing of terms used in Health, United States, and these definitions are specific to the data presented in this report. The methods used for calculating age-adjusted rates, average annual rates of change, relative standard errors, birth rates, death rates, and years of potential life lost are described. Included are standard populations used for age adjustment (Tables I and II), the years when the revisions for International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes were in effect (Table III), codes for cause of death from the 6th through 10th revisions of ICD (Table IV), and comparability ratios between the 9th and 10th revisions (ICD–9 and ICD–10) for selected causes (Table V), imputed family income percentages from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (Table VI), an analysis of the effect of added probe questions for Medicare and Medicaid coverage on health insurance rates in NHIS (Table VII), industry codes from the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (Table VIII), and ICD–9 Clinical Modification (ICD–9–CM) codes for external causes of injury, diagnostic, and procedure categories (Tables IX–XII). Standards for presenting federal data on race and ethnicity are described, and sample tabulations of NHIS data comparing the 1977 and 1997 Office of Management and Budget standards for the classification of federal data on race and ethnicity are presented in Tables XIII and XIV.

Appendix II: Listing of Terms

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the pathogen that causes AIDS, and HIV disease is the term that encompasses all the condition's stages—from infection to the deterioration of the immune system and the onset of opportunistic diseases. However, AIDS is still the term most people use to refer to the immune deficiency caused by HIV. An AIDS diagnosis (indicating that the person has reached the late stages of the disease) is given to people with HIV who have CD4+ cell (also known as T cells or T4 cells, which are the main target of HIV) counts below 200 cells per cubic millimeter (fewer than 200 cells/μL) or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, or who have been diagnosed with at least one of a set of opportunistic diseases. All 50 states, the District of Columbia (D.C.) and six U.S. dependent areas (American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, Republic of Palau, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) report AIDS cases to CDC using a uniform surveillance case definition and case report form. The case reporting definitions were expanded in 1985 (see MMWR 1985;34:373–5); 1987 [MMWR 1987;36(SS–01):1S–15S]; and 1993 for adults and adolescents [MMWR 1992; 41(RR–17):1– 19]; and in 1994 for pediatric cases [MMWR 1994;43(RR– 12):1–19]. The revisions incorporated a broader range of AIDS-indicator diseases and conditions and used HIV diagnostic tests to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the definition. The 1993 expansion of the case definition caused a temporary distortion of AIDS incidence trends.

In 2005, CDC collaborated with the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) to recommend a change in the AIDS case definition to require laboratory confirmation of HIV infection in addition to a CD4+ T-lymphocyte count of fewer than 200 cells/μL, a CD4+ T-lymphocyte percentage of total lymphocytes of less than 14%, or diagnosis of an AIDS-defining condition.

From 2008 to the present, a revised HIV case definition was used to classify HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children. The revised definition incorporates the following HIV infection classification staging system:

  • HIV infection, stage 1: No AIDS-defining condition and either CD4 count of 500 cells/μL or more or CD4 percentage of total lymphocytes of 29% or more.
  • HIV infection, stage 2: No AIDS-defining condition and either a CD4 count of 200–499 cells/μL or a CD4 percentage of total lymphocytes of 14%–28%.
  • HIV infection, stage 3 (AIDS): Documentation of an AIDS-defining condition or either a CD4 count of less than 200 cells/μL or a CD4 percentage of total lymphocytes of less than 14%. Documentation of an AIDS-defining condition supersedes a CD4 count or percentage that would not, by itself, be the basis for a stage 3 (AIDS) classification.
  • HIV infection, stage unknown: No reported information on AIDS-defining conditions and no information available on CD4 count or percentage [see MMWR 2008;57(RR–10):1–8].
  • In 1996, regimens of proven combinations of medications, known as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), became the standard of care for HIV and AIDS. These therapies have prevented or delayed the onset of AIDS and premature death among many HIV-infected persons, and this should be considered when interpreting trend data. AIDS surveillance data are published annually by CDC in the HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, available from: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/ reports/index.htm.[Also see Appendix II, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease.]

My Note: I used a special keystroke combination to edit the Table of Contents below

Active physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
Activities of daily living (ADL)
Admission
Age
Age adjustment
Alcohol consumption
Any-listed diagnosis—See Appendix II, Diagnosis.
Average annual rate of change (percent change)
Average length of stay
Basic actions difficulty
Bed, health facility
Binge drinking
Birth cohort
Birth rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
Birthweight
Blood pressure, high
Body mass index (BMI)
Cause of death
Cause-of-death ranking
Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
Cholesterol
Cigarette smoking
Civilian noninstitutionalized population; Civilian population—See Appendix II, Population.
Colorectal tests or procedures
Community hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Comparability ratio
Compensation—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
Complex activity limitation
Consumer Price Index (CPI)
Contraception
Cost-charge ratio
Critical access hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Crude birth rate; Crude death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates; Rate: Death and related rates.
Days of care
Death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
Dental caries
Dental visit
Diabetes
Diagnosis
Diagnostic and other nonsurgical procedure—See Appendix II, Procedure.
Discharge
Domiciliary care home—See Appendix II, Long-term care facility; Nursing home.
Drug
Drug abuse—See Appendix II, Illicit drug use.
Education
Emergency department
Emergency department or emergency room visit
Employer costs for employee compensation
End-stage renal disease (ESRD)
Ethnicity—See Appendix II, Hispanic origin.
Exercise—See Appendix II, Physical activity, leisure-time.
Expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national. [Also see Appendix I, National Health Expenditure Accounts (NHEA).]
External cause of injury
Family income
Federal hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Fee-for-service health insurance
Fertility rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Birth and related rates.
General hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Geographic region
Figure I. U.S. Census Bureau: Four geographic regions and nine divisions of the United States

HUS2013BackAppendixIIFigure1.png

Gestation
Gross domestic product (GDP)
Health care contact
Health expenditures, national
Health insurance coverage
Health maintenance organization (HMO)
Health services and supplies expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
Health status, respondent-assessed
Hearing trouble
Hispanic origin
Home visit
Hospital
Hospital-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
Hospital day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
Hospital utilization
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease
Hypertension—See Appendix II, Blood pressure, high.
Illicit drug use
Immunization—See Appendix II, Vaccination.
Incidence
Income—See Appendix II, Family income.
Individual practice association (IPA)—See Appendix II, Health maintenance organization (HMO).
Industry of employment
Infant death
Injury
Injury-related visit
Inpatient
Inpatient care—See Appendix II, Hospital utilization.
Inpatient day—See Appendix II, Days of care.
Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL)
Insurance—See Appendix II, Health insurance coverage.
Intermediate care facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
International Classification of Diseases (ICD)
International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision,  Clinical Modification (ICD–9–CM)
International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision,  Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System  (ICD–10–CM/PCS)
Late fetal death rate—See Appendix II, Rate: Death and related rates.
Leading causes of death—See Appendix II, Cause-of-death ranking.
Length of stay—See Appendix II, Average length of stay.
Life expectancy
Limitation of activity
Long-term care facility
Low birthweight—See Appendix II, Birthweight.
Mammography
Managed care
Marital status
Maternal age—See Appendix II, Age.
Maternal education—See Appendix II, Education.
Medicaid
Medicaid payments
Medical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
Medicare
Metropolitan statistical area (MSA)
Micropolitan statistical area
Multum Lexicon Plus therapeutic class
Neonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II, Rate Death and related rates.
Nonprofit hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)—See Appendix II, Industry of employment.
Notifiable disease
Nursing home
Nursing home expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
Obesity—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
Occupancy rate
Office-based physician—See Appendix II, Physician.
Office visit
Operation—See Appendix II, Procedure.
Outpatient department
Outpatient surgery
Outpatient visit
Overweight—See Appendix II, Body mass index (BMI).
Pap smear
Patient—See Appendix II, Inpatient; Office visitOutpatient visit.
Percent change/percentage change—See Appendix II, Average annual rate of change (percent change).
Perinatal mortality rate; ratio—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
Personal care home with or without nursing—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
Personal health care expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
Physical activity, leisure-time
Physician
Physician specialty
Population
Postneonatal mortality rate—See Appendix II,  Rate: Death and related rates.
Poverty
Preferred provider organization (PPO)
Prenatal care
Prevalence
Primary care specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
Private expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
Procedure
Proprietary hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Public expenditures—See Appendix II, Health expenditures, national.
Purchasing power parities (PPPs)
Race
Rate
Region—See Appendix II, Geographic region.
Registered hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Registration area
Relative standard error (RSE)
Relative survival rate
Reporting area
Resident, health facility
Resident population—See Appendix II, Population.
Rural—See Appendix II, Urbanization.
Self-assessment of health—See Appendix II, Health status, respondent-assessed.
Serious psychological distress
Short-stay hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Skilled nursing facility—See Appendix II, Nursing home.
Smoker—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
Special hospital—See Appendix II, Hospital.
Substance use
Suicidal ideation
Surgery—See Appendix II, Outpatient surgeryProcedure.
Surgical specialty—See Appendix II, Physician specialty.
Tobacco use—See Appendix II, Cigarette smoking.
Uninsured
Urbanization
Usual source of care
Vaccination
Wages and salaries—See Appendix II, Employer costs for employee compensation.
Years of potential life lost (YPLL)

Index

My Note: I do not need to reproduce the complete Index below because one can pick a word or phrase to use in Google Chrome Find to see all the instances of it in the MindTouch page. The Index could be used like a "word wheel" to suggest words or phases if the user cannot think of them from reading the text.

Index

(Numbers are table and figure numbers)

A

Table/Figure (F)
Abortion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Access to care (see also Dental visits; Emergency department visits;
Health insurance; Hospital utilization; Injuries; Unmet need for medical care, dental care, prescription drugs)
Health care visits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
No recent health care visit, children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
No usual source of care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72, 73, F17
Accidents, see Motor vehicle-related injuries; Unintentional injuries. Activities of daily living (ADL) see Basic actions difficulty; Complex activity limitation; Limitation of activity. Adolescents, see Child and adolescent health. AIDS, see HIV/AIDS. Alcohol consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 61, 63

ETC.

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