Table of contents
  1. Story
    1. Suggestions
    2. Response
    3. Results
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 29 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to MindTouch Knowledge Base
    2. Slide 30 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to Excel Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 31 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 1
    4. Slide 32 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 2
    5. Slide 33 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: HAB Advisories
    6. Slide 34 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix B
    7. Slide 35 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix C
    8. Slide 36 Conclusions and Recommendations
    9. Slide 37 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Spotfire Manage Relations
    10. Slide 38 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Project Info
    11. Slide 39 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Land Use
    12. Slide 40 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Participant
    13. Slide 41 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Activity Cost
    14. Slide 42 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Comment
    15. Slide 43 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Goal
    16. Slide 44 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-In Stream Water Right
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
    1. Data Science for Oregon HAB Data
    2. Data Science for Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes
  4. Research Notes
    1. Emails
    2. Oregon DEQ Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Strategy 2011
      1. Harmful Algal Blooms
        1. Oregon waterbodies with OHA harmful algal bloom advisories through 2011
        2. 2004 Anabaena bloom, a type of cyanobacteria, in Odell Lake
        3. Microscopic image of Microcystis, a type of cyanobacteria
        4. Background
        5. DEQ's TMDL Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy
        6. Causes
        7. Response
        8. Actions to Control and Eliminate
        9. Prevention
        10. Who to Contact about Harmful Algal Blooms
  5. Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy (June 2011)
    1. Abbreviations and Acronyms
    2. Acknowledgements
    3. 1. Organization of the Report
    4. 2. Introduction
      1. 2.1 Background – Why a HAB Strategy Document?
      2. 2.2 Scope and Audience for this Report
      3. 2.3 DEQ’s Current HAB Strategy
        1. Figure 2-1 DEQ’s HAB Strategy
    5. 3. Harmful Algal Blooms in Oregon
      1. 3.1 What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)?
      2. 3.2 Why are HABs a concern?
        1. Table 3-1. Specific toxins produced by genera of cyanobacteria worldwide
      3. 3.3 HABs Advisories in Oregon
        1. Figure 3-1 OHA Criteria 23 for Issuing and Lifting a Recreational Public Health Advisory for HABs (as of April 2011)
        2. Table 3-2. Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Advisories 24 (year of advisory shown)
      4. 3.4 Algal Species of Concern in Oregon Fresh Water Environments
        1. Figure Food Chain
      5. 3.5 Waterbodies of Potential Concern for HABs
        1. Figure 3-2 Waterbodies of Concern for HABs including lakes, reservoirs and rivers
        2. Table 3-3. Comparison of the lakes and reservoirs of potential concern in Oregon to the total number of lakes and reservoirs
      6. 3.6 Characterization of HABs Problems in Oregon and Implications for their Management
        1. Table 3-4. Waterbodies with HAB Health Advisories summarized in Appendix C
        2. 3.6.1 Control of External Loadings of Excess Nutrients From the Watershed
        3. 3.6.2 Introduced Fish Species Appear to Play a Significant Role Driving the Internal Loadings in Some Lakes
        4. 3.6.3 A Number of Reservoirs Experience HABs
        5. 3.6.4 A Number of Small Ponds and Wetlands in Urban and Agricultural Areas Experience HABs
        6. 3.6.5 A Number of Rivers Experience HABs and Have Resulted in Animal Deaths
    6. 4. General Methods for Controlling and Preventing HABs
      1. 4.1 Controlling and Preventing HABs
        1. Table 4-1. In-Lake Management actions for controlling excessive algal growth 57
      2. 4.2 Management Plans and Means for their Implementation
    7. 5. HABs Management: The Big Picture
      1. 5.1 Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act
        1. Table 5-1 Research and infrastructure priorities and goals to advance freshwater HAB research and response
      2. 5.2 EPA Nutrient Reduction Partnership with States
      3. 5.3 Climate Change
    8. 6. DEQ Programs to Prevent and Control HABs
      1. 6.1 Surveillance/Monitoring for HABs
      2. 6.1.1 Current HAB Related Surveillance Approaches
        1. 6.1.2 Other Potential Methods that could Supplement HABs Surveillance
        2. 6.1.3 Assessment of Current HAB Related Surveillance Program
        3. 6.1.4 Recommendations on HAB Surveillance Approaches
      3. 6.2 Standards and Assessments
        1. 6.2.1 Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
        2. 6.2.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
          1. Figure 6-1. Waters with Nutrient TMDLs (see Table 6-1 for detail)
          2. Table 6-1 Pollutants and estimated instream targets from nutrient TMDLs
          3. Table 6-2 EPA suggested nutrient criteria for reference conditions in Oregon rivers and streams
        3. 6.2.3 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
      4. 6.3 Pollution Reduction Plans (e.g. TMDLs and other Management Plans)
        1. 6.3.1 Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
        2. 6.3.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
        3. 6.3.3 Recommendations Related to Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
      5. 6.4 Drinking Water Source Water Protection (SWP)
        1. 6.4.1 Current HAB Related Source Water Protection Approaches
        2. 6.4.2 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Drinking Water Protection Approaches
      6. 6.5 Nonpoint Sources
        1. Table 6-3 Oregon Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategies by Land Use
        2. 6.5.1 Recommendations related to Current Nonpoint Source Activities
      7. 6.6 Waste Water Permiting, On-Site System and 401 Certifications
        1. 6.6.1 On-Site Disposal Systems
        2. 6.6.2 NPDES Permits
        3. 6.6.3 401 Hydro Relicensing
      8. 6.7 Funding
        1. Table 6-4 Federal Section 319 Grant Funding for Lake Projects in Oregon (FY 2001 – 2010)
    9. 7. Synthesis
      1. 7.1 Suggested Priorities
        1. Table 7-1 A list of actions that DEQ Subprograms should continue
      2. 7.2 Future Updates
    10. 8. Bibliography
    11. Appendix A - Common Cyanobacteria in Oregon
    12. Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms
    13. Appendix C - Summary of Specific Waterbodies with HABs
      1. Blue Lake
      2. Crane Prairie Reservoir
      3. Devils Lake
      4. Diamond Lake
      5. Haystack Reservoir
      6. Hyatt Reservoir
      7. Upper Klamath Lake
      8. Lake Oswego
      9. Lake Oswego
      10. Lava Lake
      11. Lemolo Reservoir
      12. Lost Creek Reservoir
      13. Odell Lake
      14. Paulina Lake
      15. Elk Creek/Umpqua River
      16. South Umpqua Below Lawson Bar
      17. Selmac Lake
      18. Siltcoos Lake
      19. Suttle Lake
      20. Tenmile Lakes
      21. Wapato Lake
      22. Wickiup Reservoir
      23. Willow Lake
      24. Willamette Basin Reservoir System
        1. Willamette Basin Reservoir System
        2. Big Cliff Reservoir
        3. Detroit Reservoir
        4. Green Peter Reservoir
        5. Foster Reservoir
        6. Blue River Reservoir
        7. Cougar Reservoir
        8. Hills Creek Reservoir
        9. Lookout Point Reservoir
        10. Dexter Reservoir
        11. Fall Creek Reservoir
        12. Dorena Reservoir
        13. Cottage Grove Reservoir
        14. Fern Ridge Reservoir
    14. Appendix D - Nutrients
    15. Appendix E - Memo to the EPA
    16. Appendix F - Web Research on Lawn Maintenance Fertilizers
  6. Attachments
    1. Word
    2. Excel
  7. NEXT

Oregon HAB Data

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
    1. Suggestions
    2. Response
    3. Results
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 29 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to MindTouch Knowledge Base
    2. Slide 30 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to Excel Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 31 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 1
    4. Slide 32 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 2
    5. Slide 33 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: HAB Advisories
    6. Slide 34 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix B
    7. Slide 35 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix C
    8. Slide 36 Conclusions and Recommendations
    9. Slide 37 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Spotfire Manage Relations
    10. Slide 38 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Project Info
    11. Slide 39 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Land Use
    12. Slide 40 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Participant
    13. Slide 41 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Activity Cost
    14. Slide 42 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Comment
    15. Slide 43 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Goal
    16. Slide 44 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-In Stream Water Right
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
    1. Data Science for Oregon HAB Data
    2. Data Science for Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes
  4. Research Notes
    1. Emails
    2. Oregon DEQ Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Strategy 2011
      1. Harmful Algal Blooms
        1. Oregon waterbodies with OHA harmful algal bloom advisories through 2011
        2. 2004 Anabaena bloom, a type of cyanobacteria, in Odell Lake
        3. Microscopic image of Microcystis, a type of cyanobacteria
        4. Background
        5. DEQ's TMDL Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy
        6. Causes
        7. Response
        8. Actions to Control and Eliminate
        9. Prevention
        10. Who to Contact about Harmful Algal Blooms
  5. Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy (June 2011)
    1. Abbreviations and Acronyms
    2. Acknowledgements
    3. 1. Organization of the Report
    4. 2. Introduction
      1. 2.1 Background – Why a HAB Strategy Document?
      2. 2.2 Scope and Audience for this Report
      3. 2.3 DEQ’s Current HAB Strategy
        1. Figure 2-1 DEQ’s HAB Strategy
    5. 3. Harmful Algal Blooms in Oregon
      1. 3.1 What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)?
      2. 3.2 Why are HABs a concern?
        1. Table 3-1. Specific toxins produced by genera of cyanobacteria worldwide
      3. 3.3 HABs Advisories in Oregon
        1. Figure 3-1 OHA Criteria 23 for Issuing and Lifting a Recreational Public Health Advisory for HABs (as of April 2011)
        2. Table 3-2. Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Advisories 24 (year of advisory shown)
      4. 3.4 Algal Species of Concern in Oregon Fresh Water Environments
        1. Figure Food Chain
      5. 3.5 Waterbodies of Potential Concern for HABs
        1. Figure 3-2 Waterbodies of Concern for HABs including lakes, reservoirs and rivers
        2. Table 3-3. Comparison of the lakes and reservoirs of potential concern in Oregon to the total number of lakes and reservoirs
      6. 3.6 Characterization of HABs Problems in Oregon and Implications for their Management
        1. Table 3-4. Waterbodies with HAB Health Advisories summarized in Appendix C
        2. 3.6.1 Control of External Loadings of Excess Nutrients From the Watershed
        3. 3.6.2 Introduced Fish Species Appear to Play a Significant Role Driving the Internal Loadings in Some Lakes
        4. 3.6.3 A Number of Reservoirs Experience HABs
        5. 3.6.4 A Number of Small Ponds and Wetlands in Urban and Agricultural Areas Experience HABs
        6. 3.6.5 A Number of Rivers Experience HABs and Have Resulted in Animal Deaths
    6. 4. General Methods for Controlling and Preventing HABs
      1. 4.1 Controlling and Preventing HABs
        1. Table 4-1. In-Lake Management actions for controlling excessive algal growth 57
      2. 4.2 Management Plans and Means for their Implementation
    7. 5. HABs Management: The Big Picture
      1. 5.1 Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act
        1. Table 5-1 Research and infrastructure priorities and goals to advance freshwater HAB research and response
      2. 5.2 EPA Nutrient Reduction Partnership with States
      3. 5.3 Climate Change
    8. 6. DEQ Programs to Prevent and Control HABs
      1. 6.1 Surveillance/Monitoring for HABs
      2. 6.1.1 Current HAB Related Surveillance Approaches
        1. 6.1.2 Other Potential Methods that could Supplement HABs Surveillance
        2. 6.1.3 Assessment of Current HAB Related Surveillance Program
        3. 6.1.4 Recommendations on HAB Surveillance Approaches
      3. 6.2 Standards and Assessments
        1. 6.2.1 Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
        2. 6.2.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
          1. Figure 6-1. Waters with Nutrient TMDLs (see Table 6-1 for detail)
          2. Table 6-1 Pollutants and estimated instream targets from nutrient TMDLs
          3. Table 6-2 EPA suggested nutrient criteria for reference conditions in Oregon rivers and streams
        3. 6.2.3 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
      4. 6.3 Pollution Reduction Plans (e.g. TMDLs and other Management Plans)
        1. 6.3.1 Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
        2. 6.3.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
        3. 6.3.3 Recommendations Related to Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
      5. 6.4 Drinking Water Source Water Protection (SWP)
        1. 6.4.1 Current HAB Related Source Water Protection Approaches
        2. 6.4.2 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Drinking Water Protection Approaches
      6. 6.5 Nonpoint Sources
        1. Table 6-3 Oregon Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategies by Land Use
        2. 6.5.1 Recommendations related to Current Nonpoint Source Activities
      7. 6.6 Waste Water Permiting, On-Site System and 401 Certifications
        1. 6.6.1 On-Site Disposal Systems
        2. 6.6.2 NPDES Permits
        3. 6.6.3 401 Hydro Relicensing
      8. 6.7 Funding
        1. Table 6-4 Federal Section 319 Grant Funding for Lake Projects in Oregon (FY 2001 – 2010)
    9. 7. Synthesis
      1. 7.1 Suggested Priorities
        1. Table 7-1 A list of actions that DEQ Subprograms should continue
      2. 7.2 Future Updates
    10. 8. Bibliography
    11. Appendix A - Common Cyanobacteria in Oregon
    12. Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms
    13. Appendix C - Summary of Specific Waterbodies with HABs
      1. Blue Lake
      2. Crane Prairie Reservoir
      3. Devils Lake
      4. Diamond Lake
      5. Haystack Reservoir
      6. Hyatt Reservoir
      7. Upper Klamath Lake
      8. Lake Oswego
      9. Lake Oswego
      10. Lava Lake
      11. Lemolo Reservoir
      12. Lost Creek Reservoir
      13. Odell Lake
      14. Paulina Lake
      15. Elk Creek/Umpqua River
      16. South Umpqua Below Lawson Bar
      17. Selmac Lake
      18. Siltcoos Lake
      19. Suttle Lake
      20. Tenmile Lakes
      21. Wapato Lake
      22. Wickiup Reservoir
      23. Willow Lake
      24. Willamette Basin Reservoir System
        1. Willamette Basin Reservoir System
        2. Big Cliff Reservoir
        3. Detroit Reservoir
        4. Green Peter Reservoir
        5. Foster Reservoir
        6. Blue River Reservoir
        7. Cougar Reservoir
        8. Hills Creek Reservoir
        9. Lookout Point Reservoir
        10. Dexter Reservoir
        11. Fall Creek Reservoir
        12. Dorena Reservoir
        13. Cottage Grove Reservoir
        14. Fern Ridge Reservoir
    14. Appendix D - Nutrients
    15. Appendix E - Memo to the EPA
    16. Appendix F - Web Research on Lawn Maintenance Fertilizers
  6. Attachments
    1. Word
    2. Excel
  7. NEXT

  1. Story
    1. Suggestions
    2. Response
    3. Results
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 29 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to MindTouch Knowledge Base
    2. Slide 30 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to Excel Knowledge Base
    3. Slide 31 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 1
    4. Slide 32 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 2
    5. Slide 33 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: HAB Advisories
    6. Slide 34 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix B
    7. Slide 35 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix C
    8. Slide 36 Conclusions and Recommendations
    9. Slide 37 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Spotfire Manage Relations
    10. Slide 38 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Project Info
    11. Slide 39 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Land Use
    12. Slide 40 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Participant
    13. Slide 41 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Activity Cost
    14. Slide 42 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Comment
    15. Slide 43 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Goal
    16. Slide 44 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-In Stream Water Right
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
    1. Data Science for Oregon HAB Data
    2. Data Science for Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes
  4. Research Notes
    1. Emails
    2. Oregon DEQ Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Strategy 2011
      1. Harmful Algal Blooms
        1. Oregon waterbodies with OHA harmful algal bloom advisories through 2011
        2. 2004 Anabaena bloom, a type of cyanobacteria, in Odell Lake
        3. Microscopic image of Microcystis, a type of cyanobacteria
        4. Background
        5. DEQ's TMDL Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy
        6. Causes
        7. Response
        8. Actions to Control and Eliminate
        9. Prevention
        10. Who to Contact about Harmful Algal Blooms
  5. Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy (June 2011)
    1. Abbreviations and Acronyms
    2. Acknowledgements
    3. 1. Organization of the Report
    4. 2. Introduction
      1. 2.1 Background – Why a HAB Strategy Document?
      2. 2.2 Scope and Audience for this Report
      3. 2.3 DEQ’s Current HAB Strategy
        1. Figure 2-1 DEQ’s HAB Strategy
    5. 3. Harmful Algal Blooms in Oregon
      1. 3.1 What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)?
      2. 3.2 Why are HABs a concern?
        1. Table 3-1. Specific toxins produced by genera of cyanobacteria worldwide
      3. 3.3 HABs Advisories in Oregon
        1. Figure 3-1 OHA Criteria 23 for Issuing and Lifting a Recreational Public Health Advisory for HABs (as of April 2011)
        2. Table 3-2. Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Advisories 24 (year of advisory shown)
      4. 3.4 Algal Species of Concern in Oregon Fresh Water Environments
        1. Figure Food Chain
      5. 3.5 Waterbodies of Potential Concern for HABs
        1. Figure 3-2 Waterbodies of Concern for HABs including lakes, reservoirs and rivers
        2. Table 3-3. Comparison of the lakes and reservoirs of potential concern in Oregon to the total number of lakes and reservoirs
      6. 3.6 Characterization of HABs Problems in Oregon and Implications for their Management
        1. Table 3-4. Waterbodies with HAB Health Advisories summarized in Appendix C
        2. 3.6.1 Control of External Loadings of Excess Nutrients From the Watershed
        3. 3.6.2 Introduced Fish Species Appear to Play a Significant Role Driving the Internal Loadings in Some Lakes
        4. 3.6.3 A Number of Reservoirs Experience HABs
        5. 3.6.4 A Number of Small Ponds and Wetlands in Urban and Agricultural Areas Experience HABs
        6. 3.6.5 A Number of Rivers Experience HABs and Have Resulted in Animal Deaths
    6. 4. General Methods for Controlling and Preventing HABs
      1. 4.1 Controlling and Preventing HABs
        1. Table 4-1. In-Lake Management actions for controlling excessive algal growth 57
      2. 4.2 Management Plans and Means for their Implementation
    7. 5. HABs Management: The Big Picture
      1. 5.1 Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act
        1. Table 5-1 Research and infrastructure priorities and goals to advance freshwater HAB research and response
      2. 5.2 EPA Nutrient Reduction Partnership with States
      3. 5.3 Climate Change
    8. 6. DEQ Programs to Prevent and Control HABs
      1. 6.1 Surveillance/Monitoring for HABs
      2. 6.1.1 Current HAB Related Surveillance Approaches
        1. 6.1.2 Other Potential Methods that could Supplement HABs Surveillance
        2. 6.1.3 Assessment of Current HAB Related Surveillance Program
        3. 6.1.4 Recommendations on HAB Surveillance Approaches
      3. 6.2 Standards and Assessments
        1. 6.2.1 Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
        2. 6.2.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
          1. Figure 6-1. Waters with Nutrient TMDLs (see Table 6-1 for detail)
          2. Table 6-1 Pollutants and estimated instream targets from nutrient TMDLs
          3. Table 6-2 EPA suggested nutrient criteria for reference conditions in Oregon rivers and streams
        3. 6.2.3 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
      4. 6.3 Pollution Reduction Plans (e.g. TMDLs and other Management Plans)
        1. 6.3.1 Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
        2. 6.3.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
        3. 6.3.3 Recommendations Related to Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
      5. 6.4 Drinking Water Source Water Protection (SWP)
        1. 6.4.1 Current HAB Related Source Water Protection Approaches
        2. 6.4.2 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Drinking Water Protection Approaches
      6. 6.5 Nonpoint Sources
        1. Table 6-3 Oregon Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategies by Land Use
        2. 6.5.1 Recommendations related to Current Nonpoint Source Activities
      7. 6.6 Waste Water Permiting, On-Site System and 401 Certifications
        1. 6.6.1 On-Site Disposal Systems
        2. 6.6.2 NPDES Permits
        3. 6.6.3 401 Hydro Relicensing
      8. 6.7 Funding
        1. Table 6-4 Federal Section 319 Grant Funding for Lake Projects in Oregon (FY 2001 – 2010)
    9. 7. Synthesis
      1. 7.1 Suggested Priorities
        1. Table 7-1 A list of actions that DEQ Subprograms should continue
      2. 7.2 Future Updates
    10. 8. Bibliography
    11. Appendix A - Common Cyanobacteria in Oregon
    12. Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms
    13. Appendix C - Summary of Specific Waterbodies with HABs
      1. Blue Lake
      2. Crane Prairie Reservoir
      3. Devils Lake
      4. Diamond Lake
      5. Haystack Reservoir
      6. Hyatt Reservoir
      7. Upper Klamath Lake
      8. Lake Oswego
      9. Lake Oswego
      10. Lava Lake
      11. Lemolo Reservoir
      12. Lost Creek Reservoir
      13. Odell Lake
      14. Paulina Lake
      15. Elk Creek/Umpqua River
      16. South Umpqua Below Lawson Bar
      17. Selmac Lake
      18. Siltcoos Lake
      19. Suttle Lake
      20. Tenmile Lakes
      21. Wapato Lake
      22. Wickiup Reservoir
      23. Willow Lake
      24. Willamette Basin Reservoir System
        1. Willamette Basin Reservoir System
        2. Big Cliff Reservoir
        3. Detroit Reservoir
        4. Green Peter Reservoir
        5. Foster Reservoir
        6. Blue River Reservoir
        7. Cougar Reservoir
        8. Hills Creek Reservoir
        9. Lookout Point Reservoir
        10. Dexter Reservoir
        11. Fall Creek Reservoir
        12. Dorena Reservoir
        13. Cottage Grove Reservoir
        14. Fern Ridge Reservoir
    14. Appendix D - Nutrients
    15. Appendix E - Memo to the EPA
    16. Appendix F - Web Research on Lawn Maintenance Fertilizers
  6. Attachments
    1. Word
    2. Excel
  7. NEXT

Story

Data Science for Oregon HAB Data

Suggestions

USE OWRI DATASET in conjunction with databases on HABs and land use change

OWRI Use Type 1 – Create table covering all affected waterbodies
For lakes (or other waterbodies) with HABs or concern:
Create a table broken up according to dominant land use / land use change category in the vicinity. (Refer to legend on Figure 3 of Land Use Change on Non Federal Land in Oregon and Washington – Sept. 2013.  Six of these are resource use characteristics as shown on the land use map.  The difference is that it shows, for Oregon, urban as of 1974 vs. urban after 1974.)
For each group, select reports of watershed restoration activities near those lakes (OWRI database).  Show numeric distribution of restoration activities.  These appear on the reports as Activity type (Fish Passage; Instream; Riparian; Road; Upland; Urban; Wetland).  The map legend also shows “combined” when there are multiple types.  Within each activity type, there are named activities (e.g., Riparian Activity has Riparian invasive plant control; Upland Activity has Upland invasive plant control).   Showing the named activities within activity type is much more useful than just listing activity types.  

OWRI Use Type 2 – Create table for particular area
Select area around particular lake with HAB or related problem.
Show land use change characteristics 
For the main sub-basin around the lake, select reports of watershed restoration activities and show numeric distribution of restoration activities as above.

Response

Spreadsheet Tables: Oregon HAB Data

So, the HAB Strategy document is a wealth of information and tables:

7.1 Suggested Priorities

Table 7-1
Develop a DEQ HABs website to provide access to the HAB strategy,
Satellite analysis, other DEQ HAB related info, links, and other
available information; 

7.2 Future Updates
This is the initial attempt for identifying and making recommendations for improving DEQ’s overall HAB strategy. It is not perfect and will need to be reviewed and modified over time. It will only get better with future updates. It is recommended that this occur on an annual or biennial basis and be timed with the annual review of the Oregon HAB surveillance program that is coordinated through the OHA.

4 Figures: 2-1, 3-1, 3-2, and 6-1

11 Tables: 3-1,3-2, 3-3, 3-4, 4-1, 5-1, 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 (Land Use), 6-4, and 7-1

A key table is Appendix B with 19 pages: Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms 

I have converted that PDF table to Excel: Oregon HAB Data 

This table relates HAB to Land Use and other Parameters.

Results

All 6 tables are linked and each panel shows Tenmile Lakes only and Activity cost shows Riparian only. Forests are the predominant land use type over all, but rangeland is for Tenmile Lakes as you said.

This is set up to query for all and each of the 112 Basins Reported and have it automatically update all 6 panels! This will make a cool demo.

See:

Slides

Slides

Slide 29 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to MindTouch Knowledge Base

Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms

BrandNiemann04212015Slide29.png

Slide 30 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: PDF Report to Excel Knowledge Base

Oregon HAB Data

BrandNiemann04212015Slide30.png

Slide 31 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 1

Web Player

BrandNiemann04212015Slide31.png

Slide 32 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Administrative Data 2

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Slide 33 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: HAB Advisories

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Slide 34 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix B

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Slide 35 Data Science for Oregon HAB Data: Appendix C

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Slide 36 Conclusions and Recommendations

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Slide 37 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Spotfire Manage Relations

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Slide 38 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Project Info

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Slide 39 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Land Use

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Slide 40 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Participant

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Slide 41 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Activity Cost

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Slide 42 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Comment

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Slide 43 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-Goal

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Slide 44 Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes-In Stream Water Right

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Data Science for Oregon HAB Tenmile Lakes

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Research Notes

Three things:

  1. Call/email to see if they have special data sets that we could use.
  2. Look for data sets as table in PDF report appendices I can convert.
  3. Identify sets of web pages with data in text that I can mine and extract into data sets.

Emails

I am thinking in terms of a statewide mapping tool to identify areas with freshwater HAB problems and to identify particular types of watershed restoration.

Bob Hall has put together information on Tenmile Lakes watershed that for an in-depth example to demonstrate concepts and principles.   See attached.

Note especially the figures using Google Earth images to show change over time. 

There is a lot of interpretation in understanding what is happening with sediment.  The sediment flow is associated with the loss of ecosystem function.  This sediment affects HABs as well as salmon runs.

How difficult is it to pull similar images around different lake areas in Oregon?

There are of course technical issues.  I'm not sure that it would be useful without a lot of added interpretation which is beyond the scope of this study.

Here is some more information on Oregon HAB advisories and concerns.

Different lists may include different information on HAB advisories for various reasons, such as size of the waterbodies.  Some reports provide latitude/longitude.  There may also be water bodies of potential "concern" without a documented HAB advisory.  

Oregon DEQ Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Strategy 2011
http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/algae/algae.htm#deq
Main Report:  Table 3-2 shows HAB advisories for 2004 - 2011.

Main Report:  Figure 3-2 shows that there is an extensive distribution of water bodies that are of "concern" but do not fall under HAB advisories.  These should be included (see below).

Appendix B:  Waters of Potential Concern for HABs
Appendix C:  Specific Waterbodies with HABs

To:  Oregon Health Webmaster

I am interested in having the Oregon Algae Bloom Advisory Archive tabular data in the underlying file format (Excel file or files) for all available years.  These tables have columns for waterbody, region, county, etc.

http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/Recreation/HarmfulAlgaeBlooms/Archive/Pages/index.aspx

Can you provide these files?

I have attached copies of the spreadsheets you were asking for as far as advisories. We didn’t start these reports until 2011. This is what I we use. They are not in Excel.

I am also attaching some Excel spreadsheet for the lakes that had advisories pre 2011. The records seems to go back to around 2007. I will have to send an additional email with attached files.

http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/Recreation/HarmfulAlgaeBlooms/Archive/Pages/index.aspx

Can you provide these files?

Thank you for your help, Rebecca.

I have two followup questions.

Is there a description of the codes for the Advisory Basis column?  Based on a quick review, most are CC (cell counts) but there are some TT (Toxin Testing) and some "scum" (some of our advisories are based on visible scum. This is the most conservative way of dealing with a HAB and is up to the waterbody manager – the advisory stays in place until more is known about the bloom. If sampling data comes back with levels below Oregon’s guideline values then the advisory is immediately lifted. If the data is found above those values then the advisory stays in place until the bloom is gone, and additional testing confirms that cell counts AND toxins are below our guideline values).

I also notice that the bloom number is for the HABISS database.  Is there a link that could be used with the bloom number to get additional information? Unfortunately the HABIS database no longer exists. It went away at the end of 2012 I believe. The CDC is currently working on new illness reporting forms and hopefully a new illness and environmental reporting system. The data we had in HABISS and that which we continue to collect is in our Environmental Public Health Data Portal. Once you click on the link provided, choose Environmental Quality/Water/Harmful Algae Blooms/State and then click on View Report. Once on the page you can choose the “measure” (upper left hand corner) you would like to view and the year available.

I hope this makes sense.

Oregon DEQ Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Strategy 2011

Source: http://www.deq.state.or.us/wq/algae/algae.htm#deq

Harmful Algal Blooms

Current information for Friday, Sept. 19, 2014

The Oregon Health Advisory has expanded a health advisory for a stretch of the Willamette River in Portland after preliminary test results showed the presence of toxic blue-green algae in the river.

The advisory extends from Ross island downriver to the south end of Sauvie Island. Officials  recommend people avoid all contact with Willamette water in this stretch of the river.

Check OHA’s Harmful Algae Bloom webpage for updates, Q & As, fact sheets and other information.

DEQ has assisted OHA by talking algal samples from the river, having them tested, and sending test results to OHA. These types of algal blooms occasionally appear in late summer. A combination of low river flow and warmer-than-usual temperatures this summer are the likely major contributors to the algae blooms currently visible.

Oregon waterbodies with OHA harmful algal bloom advisories through 2011

(click map to enlarge)

 Image of Odell Lake

2004 Anabaena bloom, a type of cyanobacteria, in Odell Lake

(photo by Joe Eilers)

 Image of Odell Lake

Microscopic image of Microcystis, a type of cyanobacteria

(Credit:http://www-cyanosite.bio.purdue.edu/)

 

 Image of microcystis
 

Background

Harmful algal blooms are caused by high concentrations of certain types of algae that produce toxic compounds. These blooms can cause sickness and death in humans, pets and livestock who come in contact with or drink the water. Oregon has several documented cases of dogs dying and humans becoming ill. The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is the agency responsible for posting warnings and educating the public about harmful algal blooms. Once a waterbody is identified as having a harmful algal bloom, DEQ is responsible for investigating the causes, identifying sources of pollution and writing a pollution reduction plan.

Harmful algal blooms have occurred in a number of Oregon’s lakes, reservoirs and rivers. The blooms look different depending on local conditions. They can appear green, blue-green or reddish brown and form foam, slicks, scum or mats.

See below for:

  • DEQ’s TMDL Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy
  • Causes
  • Response
  • Actions to Control and Eliminate
  • Prevention
  • Who to Contact About Harmful Algal Blooms
DEQ's TMDL Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy

DEQ developed a Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) strategy in 2011 to improve its abilities to address HABs and identify needs to improve this approach.

See Below for:

  • Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy (June 2011)
  • Appendix A - Common Cyanobacteria in Oregon
  • Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms
  • Appendix C - Summary of Specific Waterbodies with HABs
  • Appendix D - Nutrients
  • Appendix E - Memo to the EPA
  • Appendix F - Web Research on Lawn Maintenance Fertilizers
Causes

Most often harmful algal blooms are caused by cyanobacteria (aka blue-green algae). Algae are simple plants that are naturally occurring and form the base of the food webs. A small percentage of algae can produce toxic compounds.

Nutrient pollution, warm water, high pH, stagnant water and lots of sunlight can lead to excessive blooms. Nutrient pollution can come from wastewater treatment plants, residential on-site wastewater treatment systems, agricultural, urban and forestry runoff and natural sources. Introduced fish species also can recycle nutrients within a lake, allowing for more intense blooms. Warm water, high pH, stagnant water and sunlight are conditions that are harder to control in lakes and large rivers than nutrient pollution.

More information about specific lakes can be found in the Atlas of Oregon Lakes.

Response

Most lakes and reservoirs have an agency which is responsible for managing recreation or drinking water. These agencies include the U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, lake associations and local government agencies.

When a potential harmful algal bloom is observed, these agencies will collect samples, document conditions and potentially post preliminary warning signs. Where there is not a management agency, such as some river sites, OHA, DEQ and local government agencies work together to respond. Sampling results are shared with OHA which will issue a recreational public health advisory when appropriate. OHA issues a press release, posts advisory information on its website and provides advisory signs.

OHA will lift an advisory when sampling indicates there is a low risk to public health. At lakes or river reaches with known recurring problems, management agencies may post year-round signs with educational information about harmful algal blooms.

Actions to Control and Eliminate

DEQ has the regulatory responsibility for restoring lakes and rivers to support recreation. DEQ tracks water bodies that don’t achieve water quality standards and develops pollution reduction plans. OHA and DEQ jointly develop drinking water protection plans. The state programs regulate pollution sources through water quality permitslicenses and certifications and nonpoint pollution source control. See DEQ's Harmful Algal Bloom strategy for evaluation of current programs and ideas for improvements.

Prevention

Protecting high quality waters from harmful algal blooms is achieved by addressing the causes. DEQ does not allow discharge of wastewater to lakes or reservoirs. However, much more work needs to be done to identify waters at risk of developing harmful blooms.

Who to Contact about Harmful Algal Blooms

For  questions or concerns about harmful algal blooms, contact OHA. Also see OHA's website for a current list of waterbodies that have Harmful Algal Bloom warnings.[print version]


For more information about DEQ's approach to Harmful Algal Blooms contact Dan Turner by phone at (503) 229-6982 or by email, or contact the appropriate Basin Coordinator.

Harmful Algal Bloom Strategy (June 2011)

PDF 89 Pages With Tables and Figures

Abbreviations and Acronyms

Acknowledgements

1. Organization of the Report

2. Introduction

2.1 Background – Why a HAB Strategy Document?

2.2 Scope and Audience for this Report

2.3 DEQ’s Current HAB Strategy

Figure 2-1 DEQ’s HAB Strategy

HABStrategyFigure2-1.png

3. Harmful Algal Blooms in Oregon

3.1 What are Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)?

3.2 Why are HABs a concern?

Table 3-1. Specific toxins produced by genera of cyanobacteria worldwide

(indicated by ‘+’)15. Cyanobacteria that have been associated with Oregon Recreational Health Advisories are shaded (from Oregon Health Authority).

3.3 HABs Advisories in Oregon

Figure 3-1 OHA Criteria 23 for Issuing and Lifting a Recreational Public Health Advisory for HABs (as of April 2011)

HABStrategyFigure3-1.png

Table 3-2. Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) Advisories 24 (year of advisory shown)

See Spreadsheet

Lake (Basin) 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Algal Species With Cell Count Above OHA Criteria
Blue Lk (Willamette)   X X           Anabaena sp; Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa
Blue River Res (Willamette)   X             Gloeotrichia echinulata
Cougar Res (Willamette) X               Anabaena
Crane Prairie Res (Deschutes)     X       X X Anabaena flos-aquae; Anabaena planctonica
Cullaby Lake (Northwest) X               Aphanizomenon
Daly Lake (Willamette) 25             X   Anabaena sp.
Detroit Res (Willamette)         X       Anabaena flos-aquae
Devils Lk (Mid Coast)     X X         Gloeotrichia echinulata
Dexter Res (Willamette) X X X X         Anabaena flos-aquae Anabaena circinalis
Diamond Lk (Umpqua) X X       X     Anabaena flos-aquae
Dorena Res (Willamette) X X X X         Anabaena flos-aquae; Gloeotrichia
Elk Ck, Umpqua R (Umpqua)     X            
Fairview Lake (Willamette)   X             Anabaena sp. Aphanizomenon sp.
Fall Creek (Willamette) X               Gloeotrichia
Fish Lk (Douglas Co, Umpqua)   X             Anabaena flos-aquae
Fish Lk (Jackson Co, Rogue) X X             Anabaena flos-aquae
Gerber Res (Klamath) X X             Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Gloeotrichia echinulata; Microcystis aeruginosa;
Golden Gardens Pond (Will.)   X             Anabaena flos-aquae; Microcystis aeruginosa;
Haystack Res   X X           Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa
Hills Ck Res (Willamette)     X X X X X   Anabaena flos-aquae; Gloeotrichia echinulata; Microcystis aeruginosa
Hyatt Res (Klamath)           X      
Lake Oswego (Willamette) 26               X Microcystis aeruginosa
Laurelhurst Pond27 (Willamette)   X X X X X     Microcystis aeruginosa
Lava Lk (Deschutes)               X Anabaena flos-aquae
Lemolo Lk (Umpqua) X X X X X X     Anabaena flos-aquae
Lookout Pt Res (Willamette)             X   Gloeotrichia
Lost Creek Res (Rogue) X X X X X X     Anabaena flos-aquae Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa
Marion Lake (Willamette)28             X   Anabaena flos-aquae
Mercer Lake (Mid Coast)                 Microcystis aeruginosa – 2002 Advisory
North Fork Res (Willamette) X X             Anabaena flos-aquae
Odell Lk (Deschutes)     X X X   X X Anabaena flos-aquae
Paulina Lk (Deschutes)     X     X   X Anabaena flos-aquae
Selmac Res (Rogue)               X Anabaena sp; Microcystis aeruginosa
Siltcoos Lk (Mid Coast)       X X       Anabaena plactonica; Anabaena sp
South Umpqua R (Umpqua) X X             Phormidium favosum; Microcystis
Sru Lk (South Coast) X X X           Anabaena circinalis
Suttle Lk (Deschutes)               X  
Tenmile Lk (South Coast) X X X         X Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena plactonica;
Timothy Lk (Willamette) X               Anabaena
Upper Klamath Lk and Agency Lake (Klamath)                 Microcystis aeruginosa - 1996 Advisory; Aphanizomenon flos-aqua present
Wapato Lk/Tualatin R (Willamette)       X         Anabaena flos-aquae
Whetstone Pond (Rogue)   X X           Anabaena circinalis
Wickiup Res (Deschutes)     X X       X Anabaena flos-aquae; Gloeotrichia echinulata; Microcystis aeruginosa
Willow Lk (Rogue)   X             Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Microcystis aeruginosa
Willow Ck Res (Umatilla) X X X X X X     Anabaena flos-aquae; Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Microcystis aeruginosa
Total 16 21 18 12 8 8 6 9  

3.4 Algal Species of Concern in Oregon Fresh Water Environments

Figure Food Chain

HABStrategySection3-4.png

3.5 Waterbodies of Potential Concern for HABs

Figure 3-2 Waterbodies of Concern for HABs including lakes, reservoirs and rivers

HABStrategyFigure3-2.png

Table 3-3. Comparison of the lakes and reservoirs of potential concern in Oregon to the total number of lakes and reservoirs

3.6 Characterization of HABs Problems in Oregon and Implications for their Management

Table 3-4. Waterbodies with HAB Health Advisories summarized in Appendix C

HABStrategyTable3-4.png

3.6.1 Control of External Loadings of Excess Nutrients From the Watershed
3.6.2 Introduced Fish Species Appear to Play a Significant Role Driving the Internal Loadings in Some Lakes
3.6.3 A Number of Reservoirs Experience HABs
3.6.4 A Number of Small Ponds and Wetlands in Urban and Agricultural Areas Experience HABs
3.6.5 A Number of Rivers Experience HABs and Have Resulted in Animal Deaths

4. General Methods for Controlling and Preventing HABs

4.1 Controlling and Preventing HABs

Table 4-1. In-Lake Management actions for controlling excessive algal growth 57

4.2 Management Plans and Means for their Implementation

5. HABs Management: The Big Picture

5.1 Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act

Table 5-1 Research and infrastructure priorities and goals to advance freshwater HAB research and response

(bolded goals were considered immediate goals and critical steps to advancing freshwater HAB research and response; from Lopez et al, 2008)

5.2 EPA Nutrient Reduction Partnership with States

5.3 Climate Change

6. DEQ Programs to Prevent and Control HABs

6.1 Surveillance/Monitoring for HABs

6.1.1 Current HAB Related Surveillance Approaches

6.1.2 Other Potential Methods that could Supplement HABs Surveillance
6.1.3 Assessment of Current HAB Related Surveillance Program
6.1.4 Recommendations on HAB Surveillance Approaches

6.2 Standards and Assessments

6.2.1 Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
6.2.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology
Figure 6-1. Waters with Nutrient TMDLs (see Table 6-1 for detail)

HABStrategyFigure6-1.png

Table 6-1 Pollutants and estimated instream targets from nutrient TMDLs

- for summary information only, see specific TMDLs for exact nutrient targets. Waters listed in chronological order of the TMDL approval date.

Table 6-2 EPA suggested nutrient criteria for reference conditions in Oregon rivers and streams

by ecoregions – 25th percentile with the range in parenthesis88

6.2.3 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Water Quality Standards and Water Quality Assessment Methodology

6.3 Pollution Reduction Plans (e.g. TMDLs and other Management Plans)

6.3.1 Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
6.3.2 Assessment of Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches
6.3.3 Recommendations Related to Current HAB Related TMDL Approaches

6.4 Drinking Water Source Water Protection (SWP)

6.4.1 Current HAB Related Source Water Protection Approaches
6.4.2 Recommendations related to Current HAB Related Drinking Water Protection Approaches

6.5 Nonpoint Sources

Table 6-3 Oregon Nonpoint Source Implementation Strategies by Land Use
6.5.1 Recommendations related to Current Nonpoint Source Activities

6.6 Waste Water Permiting, On-Site System and 401 Certifications

6.6.1 On-Site Disposal Systems
6.6.2 NPDES Permits
6.6.3 401 Hydro Relicensing

6.7 Funding

Table 6-4 Federal Section 319 Grant Funding for Lake Projects in Oregon (FY 2001 – 2010)

7. Synthesis

7.1 Suggested Priorities

Table 7-1 A list of actions that DEQ Subprograms should continue

, make adjustments or consider in order to better address HABs in Oregon

7.2 Future Updates

Cyanobacteria have been one of the earliest forms of life on earth so coping with problems due to their blooms is not new and many techniques for controlling or managing the blooms are well known. However, there is still a great deal of emerging science and technology (such as genetic monitoring and remote sensing techniques) and research being done on HABs – particularly related to their toxins and human/ecological risk assessment. Additionally, given the increasing awareness and occurance of HABs, the response infrastructure, that includes federal, state and local agencies, universities, public water systems, lake associations, etc, will be improving in their ability to plan, coordinate, communicate and use resources over time.

This is the initial attempt for identifying and making recommendations for improving DEQ’s overall HAB strategy. It is not perfect and will need to be reviewed and modified over time. It will only get better with future updates. It is recommended that this occur on an annual or biennial basis and be timed with the annual review of the Oregon HAB surveillance program that is coordinated through the OHA.

8. Bibliography

Appendix A - Common Cyanobacteria in Oregon

PDF 11 Pages with Figures and Pictures

Common Cyanobacteria in Oregon

The population dynamics of cyanobacteria and, more specifically, of the dominant cyanobacteria species that cause Health Advisories in Oregon were explored as part of the strategy development to better identify environmental factors that cause these blooms. While much of the following discussion can apply both to the dynamics in rivers and lakes, most of the research relates to work done on lakes and is more applicable to an understanding of the dynamics in lakes.

There is a strong seasonal pattern that is typically observed in the algae in deep, temperate1 lakes. Oliver and Ganf (in Whitton and Potts, 2000) described it as follows:

“Climatic and meteorological conditions influence the degree of stratification and mixing as well as light and nutrient availability. It is this physical and chemical setting that provides the stage upon which competitive interactions between species are enacted… The strong seasonal climatic signal results in a progression of phytoplankton from diatoms in early spring as thermal stratification commences through populations of green algae to culminate during summer in populations of cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates. The two major environmental variables stimulating the species progressions are changes in the stability of stratification and declining nutrient availability (Reynolds, 1984). Over the growing season the intensity of stratification increases to a maximum in summer when apparently the mixing intensity is insufficient to help maintain heavy phytoplankton, such as diatoms, in suspension. The separation of the water column into an upper epilimnion where light is available for growth and a dark hypolimnion leads to nutrient depauperate conditions developing in the surface layers as a result of phytoplankton growth and sedimentation. It is during calm weather in summer and autumn that surface blooms of cyanobacteria frequently develop, often associated with minimum nutrient concentrations in the surface layer. A secondary peak of diatoms can be associated with the onset of meromixis2 in autumn before phytoplankton populations are reduced to low levels in winter. This simplified general over-view of the responses observed in deep temperate lakes will be strongly modified by local conditions so that seasonal progressions are altered.”

Many studies have addressed the question on why cyanobacteria should be so successful in a wide range of environmental conditions. Explanations include (from Oliver and Ganf in Whitton and Potts, 2000):

  • Traits to take advantage of warmer water conditions;
  • Traits to capture reduced light densities;
  • Traits to utilize low TN:TP ratios or to access low dissolved carbon dioxide concentration (high pH conditions);
  • Buoyancy regulation;
  • Reduced zooplankton grazing;
  • Capacity to store phosphorus;

Huisman et al (2005) summarize the complexity of this undertaking as follows:
“The population dynamics of harmful cyanobacteria can be governed by a myriad of ecological factors. For instance, several cyanobacterial species are poor competitors for phosphorus that

1 Latitudes of the globe between the tropics and polar circles

2 Seasonal mixing of water

Appendix B - Oregon Waters of Potential Concern for Harmful Algal Blooms

PDF 19 Pages of Tables. See Spreadshset

Waters (primarily lakes) in Oregon Where Harmful Algal Blooms could be of Concern, Organized by basin.
Number in () = year sampled.
DEQ April 2011

Basin Name Waterbody Name Lake Type Maximum Depth (ft) Size (Acres) (from Johnson, 1985 or National Hydrog. Dataset) DHS or other HAB Advisory Other Reports of HAB Related Algal Species (from Sweet (1985) unless otherwise noted) Remote Sensing (Turner, 2010) Parameter of Concern (identified in the DEQ Integrated Report based on information from Lake Atlas) Potential Local Partner (in addition to county health departments and homeowner associations)
North Coast Cape Meares Lake dike 7 73       Aquatic Weeds (need data)  
North Coast Coffenbury Lake natural lake 9 56   Anabaena circinalis (1969), Microcystis aeruginosa (1969)     Oregon State Parks
North Coast Cullaby Lake natural lake 12 188   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1969,1982), Anabaena circinalis (1969), Anabaena spiroides (1969), Microcystis aeruginosa (1969)   Aquatic Weeds - Fanwort (303(d) list; Nutrients (need data) Clatsop County Parks
North Coast Smith Lake natural lake 6 48       Aquatic Weeds - Fanwort (303(d) list; Nutrients (need data)  
North Coast Sunset Lake natural lake 19 110   Microcystis aeruginosa (1969)   Aquatic Weeds - Fanwort (303(d) list; Nutrients (need data)  
Mid Coast Big Creek Reservoir reservoir       Microcystic aeruginosa (1995) Jacoby and Kann (2007)     City of Newport
Mid Coast Cleawox Lake natural lake 48 87   Anabaena (1965)     Oregon State Parks
Mid Coast Collard Lake natural lake 52 43       Aquatic Weeds, Algae, Dissolved Oxygen (need data)  
Mid Coast Devils Lake natural lake 22 678 Yes - Gloeotrichia echinulata (2008?,2009), Anabaena flos-aquae, Microcystis aeruginosa Anabaena circinalis (1981), Anabaena flos-aquae (1981), Gloeotrichia echinulata (1980,1982), Microcystis aeruginosa (1982)   Chlorophyll, pH (303(d) list); Nutrients (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Devils Lake Water Improvement District
Mid Coast Eckman Lake reservoir 10 45       Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, pH (need data) Oregon State Parks
Mid Coast Mercer Lake natural lake 38 359 Yes - Microcystis aeruginosa, Anabaena sp (2002) Anabaena circinalis (1981)   Aquatic Weeds, Algae, Chlorophyll (303(d) list); Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, pH (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed  
Mid Coast Siltcoos Lake natural lake 22 3164 Yes - Anabaena planctonica (2007), Anabaena sp (2008) Anabaena circinalis (1981)   Aquatic Weeds, Algae (303(d) list); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed  
Mid Coast Sutton Lake natural lake 33 107   Anabaena circinalis (1981)   Aquatic Weeds, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Siuslaw N.F.
Mid Coast Tahkenitch Lake natural lake 23 1674   Anabaena circinalis (1981), Anabaena (1956), Aphanizomenon (1956)   Aquatic Weeds  
Mid Coast Triangle Lake natural lake 95 279   Aphanizomenon (1971), Gleotrichia echinulata (1956)      
Umpqua Diamond Lake natural lake 52 3214 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2005,2006, 2010) Anabaena planctonica (1982), Gloeotrichia echinulata (1969,1971), Anabaena (1971-1977) X Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, pH (TMDL approved) Umpqua N.F.
Umpqua Elk Ck (~RM 0-6.5) /Umpqua R. (~RM 38-48.5) river     Yes - confirmed dog deaths due to Microcystin (2009)     Nutrients, pH (TMDL approved)  
Umpqua Fish Lake natural lake 125 99 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2010)     Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Umpqua N.F.
Umpqua Lemolo Lake river 100 450 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2006,2007?, 2008,2009, 2010) Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena affinis (1982) X Algae, pH (303(d) list); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Umpqua N.F.
Umpqua South Umpqua River @ Lawson Bar (mouth of Cow Ck, ~RM 42) river     Yes - confirmed dog death due to Anatoxin, Phormidium favosum        
South Coast Eel Lake natural lake 65 355       pH (303(d) List) Oregon State Parks
South Coast Floras Lake natural lake 35 236       Aquatic Weeds (303(d) List)  
South Coast Garrison Lake natural lake 26 90       Aquatic Weeds, Algae (TMDL approved)  
South Coast Horsfall Lake natural lake 3 204       Algae, Nutrients (need data)  
South Coast North Tenmile Lake natural lake 23 1098 Yes - Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2009,2010); Microcystis aeruginosa (1997,2002-04,2009,2010), Anabaena planctonica (2009,2010)       Tenmile Lakes Watershed Council
South Coast Sandpoint Lake natural lake           Nutrients (need data)  
South Coast Spirit Lake natural lake           Algae, Nutrients (need data)  
South Coast Sru Lake natural lake     Yes - Anabaena circinalis (2009, 2010)     Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Rogue River - Siskiyou N. F.
South Coast Tenmile Lake natural lake 22 1627 Yes - Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2009,2010); Microcystis aeruginosa (1997,2002-04,2009,2010), Anabaena planctonica (2009,2010) Aphanizomenon (1956)   Aquatic Weeds, Algae (TMDL approved) Tenmile Lake Basin Partnership
Rogue Agate Reservoir reservoir 55 239   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Rogue Valley Irrig Dist; Jackson Co Parks
Rogue Emigrant Lake reservoir 160 878   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1979,1982)   Algae, Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Talent Irrig. District; Jackson Co Parks
Rogue Fish Lake natural lake w/dam 31 483 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2010)     Chlorophyll a, pH (303(d) list); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Medford Irrig. District
Rogue Horseshoe Lake (Klamath Co) natural lake   19     X   Rogue N.F.
Rogue Indian Lake Reservoir reservoir   60     X    
Rogue Lost Creek Reservoir reservoir 322 3428 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2006,2007?,2008,2009,2010), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2008), Microcystis aeruginosa (2008) Anabaena flos-aquae (1984), Anabaena planctonica (1984), Anabaena spiroides (1984), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1981) X Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Rogue Selmac Reservoir reservoir 33 148 Yes - Anabaena sp (2004); Microcystis aeruginosa (2004)     Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Josephine County Parks
Rogue Whetstone Pond pond   15 Yes - Anabaena circinalis (2009, 2010)   Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed   Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife
Rogue Willow Lake reservoir 38 345 Yes - Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2010), Microcystis aeruginosa (2010) Anabaena flos-aquae (1982) X Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data), Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Jackson County Parks
Willamette Blue Lake natural lake 24 61 Yes - Anabaena sp (2009), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2010), Microcystis aeruginosa (2009) Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1969,1981,1982), Anabaena planctonica (1982), Anabaena spiroides (1982)   Algae, Aquatic Weeds, chlorophyll, pH (303(d) list); nutrients (need data); METRO
Willamette Blue River Reservoir reservoir 248 935 Yes - Gloeotrichia echinulata (2010)       U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, USFS
Willamette Bybee Lake natural lake   250       Algae, Aquatic Weeds, Nutrients, pH (TMDL Approved) METRO  
Willamette Cougar Reservoir reservoir 425 1280     X   Willamette N.F.; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Daly Lake natural lake   10   Anabaena sp (USFS - 2005)     Willamette N.F.
Willamette Detroit Reservior reservoir 440 3580 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2005,2007)     Algae (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Willamette N.F.; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Oregon State Parks
Willamette Dexter Reservoir reservoir 56 1025 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2008,2009, 2010), Anabaena circinalis (2010)   X Nutrients (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Dorena Reservoir reservoir 97 1840 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2008,2009, 2010)     Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Fairview Lake     106 Yes - Anabaena sp (2010)     Phosphorus (TMDL Approved); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed  
Willamette Fall Creek Reservoir reservoir 161 1860     X   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Fern Ridge Reservoir reservoir 33 9360   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1979), Anabaena (1981)   Algae, Nutrients (need data) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Foster Reservoir reservoir 110 1220   Anabaena circinalis (1981)     U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Golden Gardens Pond pond   2 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2010)     Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed City of Eugene
Willamette Gold Lake natural lake 43 96   Anabaena flos-aquae (1971,1982)     Willamette N.F.
Willamette Hills Creek Reservoir reservoir 299 2735 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2006?,2007, 2008,2009); Microcystis aeruginosa (2005); Gloeotrichia echinulata (2009) Anabaena circinalis (1975,1976), Anabaena flos-aquae (1971,1981), Anabaena spiroides (1971), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1971) X Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Willamette N.F.
Willamette Lake Oswego natural lake w/dam 55 395 Yes - Microcystis aeruginosa (2004)     Weeds, Algae, Dissolved Oxyen, pH, phosphorus (TMDL Approved) Lake Oswego Corp
Willamette Laurelhurst Pond pond   2 Yes - Microcystis aeruginosa (2006-2010)     Listing (4B) for algae but being addressed by COP management plan is proposed City of Portland
Willamette Lookout Point Reservoir reservoir 234 4360 Yes - Gloeotrichia (2005)     Nutrients (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Willamette Marion Lake natural lake 185 261   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982,1984,2005-USFS) X   Willamette N.F.
Willamette Middle Erma Bell Lake natural lake   41     X   Willamette N.F.
Willamette Nan Scott Lake natural lake   22     X   Willamette N.F.
Willamette North Fork Reservoir reservoir 120 324 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2010)     Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Portland General Electric, USFS
Willamette Rainbow Lake (Linn Co) natural lake   13     X   Willamette N.F.
Willamette Rock Lake (Lane Co) natural lake   11     X   Willamette N.F.
Willamette Smith Lake natural lake   600       Algae, Aquatic Weeds, Nutrients, pH (TMDL Approved) METRO
Willamette Sturgeon Lake natural lake 3 2928       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Oregon Dept of Fish & Wildlife
Willamette Timothy Lake reservoir 80 1282       Nutrients (need data) Mt Hood N.F.; Portland General Elect
Willamette Wapato Lake       Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2008)     Listing (4A) for algae but being addressed by Tualatin TMDL and Wapato Mgmt Plan Wapato Improvement District; Clean Water Service; Joint Water Commission
Willamette Whig Lake natural lake   14     X   Willamette N.F.
Sandy Hickman Lake natural lake   10   Anabaena flos-aquae (1969)     Mt Hood N.F.
Hood Laurance Lake natural lake 105 127     X   Mt Hood N.F.
Deschutes Antelope Flat Reservoir reservoir 28 170       Nutrients (need data)  
Deschutes Billy Chinook reservoir 415 3916   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1970,1982), Anabaena circinalis (1970) X Chlorophyll, pH (303(d) List); Nutrients (need data) CTWSR, Portland General Electric
Deschutes Crane Prairie Reservoir reservoir 20 4167 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2005,2009) Anabaena circinalis (1970) X Aquatic Growth, pH (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Deschutes N.F.; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Central OR Irrigation Dist
Deschutes Davis Lake natural lake 20 3906   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena circinalis (1970), Anabaena spiroides (1984), Gloeotrichia echinulata (1970) X   Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Haystack Reservoir reservoir 75 282 Yes - Microcystis aeruginosa (2009,2010); Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2009,2010)   X Nutrients (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Ochoco N.F.-Crooked R Natl Grassland; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; North Unit Irrigation Dist
Deschutes Lava Lake natural lake 34 368 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2004) Anabaena flos-aquae (1981) X DO (303(d) List); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Little Lava Lake natural lake 18 138     X   Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Little Three Creek Lake natural lake   63     X   Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Ochoco Reservoir reservoir 98 958   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1970,1982), Anabaena affinis (1982) X Algae, Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Ochoco Irrig. District
Deschutes Odell Lake natural lake w/dam 282 3582 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2005,2007, 2008,2009) Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena spiroides (1968) X Chlorophyll, pH (303(d) List); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Paulina Lake natural lake 250 1531 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2006,2009) Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena variabilis (1970) X Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Prinville Reservoir reservoir 130 3136   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena circinalis (1970), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1982) X   U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Ochoco Irrig. District
Deschutes Lake Simtustus reservoir 155 637   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1970), Gleotrichia echinulata (1970) X Chlorophyll, pH (303(d) List); Nutrients (need data) CTWSR, Portland General Electric
Deschutes Suttle Lake natural lake 75 253 Yes - (2004) Anabaena circinalis (1982), Anabaena (1971,1975), Anabaena flos-aquae (1984) X Chlorophyll, Nutrients, pH (need data); Listing as potential concern (Category 3) for algae based on health advisory that used DW criteria is proposed Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Todd Lake natural lake 60 29   Anabaena planctonica (1982) X   Deschutes N.F.
Deschutes Walton Lake natural lake 21 18   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1982) X   Ochoco N.F.
Deschutes Wickiup Reservior reservoir 70 10334 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2008,2009), Gloeotrichia echinulata (2008)   X pH (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed Deschutes N.F.; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; North Unit Irrigation Dist
Deschutes Windy Lakes natural lake   14     X   Deschutes N.F.
John Day Magone Lake natural lake 98 30   Anabaena (1982)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, pH (need data) Malheur N.F.
John Day John Day R @ Priest Hole (~RM 137.5) river       BLM Biologist Report of suspected Dog Deaths due to Cyanotoxin (2001 - 2003)     Prineville BLM
Umatilla Cold Springs Reservoir reservoir 71 1517       Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Hermistion Irrig. District
Umatilla McKay Reservoir reservoir 118 1316   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1982)   Algae, pH (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Umatilla Willow Creek Reservoir reservoir   126 Yes - Anabaena flos-aquae (2007); Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2006 - 2010); Microcystis aeruginosa (2008); Gloeotrichia echinulata (2010) Anabaena flos-aquae (1984)   Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Grande Ronde LaGrande Municipal Reservoir reservoir           Aquatic Growth (need data) City of LaGrande
Grande Ronde Morgan Reservoir reservoir 26 80       Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) City of LaGrande
Powder Brownlee Reservoir reservoir           Dog Death, Idaho TMDL for Phosphorus Pacific Corp, Idaho
Powder Philips Reservoir reservoir 125 1475   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1982)     U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Baker Valley Irrig. District
Powder Thief Valley Reservoir reservoir 38 613   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1969,1982)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Lower Powder R. Irrig. District
Powder Unity Reservoir reservoir 50 974   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1970)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, pH (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Burnt River Irrig. District
Malheur River Beulah Reservoir reservoir   2060       Nutrients (need data) Malheur Co Parks; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Vale OR. Irrig. District
Malheur River Bully Creek Reservoir reservoir 75 1001   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1967)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, pH (need data) Malheur Co Parks; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Vale OR. Irrig. District
Malheur River Cottonwood Reservoir reservoir 46 98       Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
Malheur River Malheur Reservoir reservoir 105 1282   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, pH (need data) Malheur Co Parks
Malheur River Warm Springs Reservoir reservoir 140 4195       Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Warm Sprgs. Irrig. District
Owyhee Antelope Reservoir reservoir 25 3285       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Jordan Valley Irrig. Dist.
Owyhee Upper Cow Creek Lake reservoir 16 945       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
Owyhee Owyhee Reservoir reservoir 117 13900   Aphanizomenon (1975); Microcystis aeruginosa (2002) - Jacoby and Kann (2007)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Malheur Co Parks; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Malheur Lake Chickahominy Reservoir reservoir 28 491       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management; Oregon Fish & Wildlife
Malheur Lake Delintment Lake reservoir 18 62   Aphanizomenon (1971)   Dissolved Oxygen (need data) Ochoco N.F.
Malheur Lake Fish Lake natural lake 30 10   Anabaena (1982)     Bureau of Land Management
Malheur Lake Mann Lake natural lake 14 270       Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
Malheur Lake Rock Creek Reservoir reservoir 35 207       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
Goose & Summer Lakes Cottonwood Reservoir reservoir   900   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1968,1971), Microcystis aeruginosa (1971)     Bureau of Land Management
Goose & Summer Lakes Cottonwood Meadows Reservoir reservoir 12 39   Anabaena circinalis (1970,1971), Gloeotrichia echinulata (1970,1971)   Algae, Macrophytes, nutrients, pH (need data) Fremont N.F.
Goose & Summer Lakes Crump Lake natural lake 6 7680   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1982)   Algae, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
Goose & Summer Lakes Dog Lake natural lake 22 189   Anabaena spiroides (1968), Microcystis aeruginosa (1968)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Fremont N.F.
Goose & Summer Lakes Drews Valley Reservoir reservoir 50 5579   Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1970)   Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Fremont N.F.
Goose & Summer Lakes Hart Lake natural lake 11 7234       Nutrients (need data)  
Goose & Summer Lakes Thompson Valley Reservoir reservoir 22 1802     X Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Fremont N.F.
Klamath Agency Lake natural lake 7 9298   Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena circinalis (1959), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1959,1964-68,1977,1978,1982) X Chlorophyll a, Dissolved Oxygen, pH, Nutrients (TMDL Approved)  
Klamath Budger Lake (Klamath Co) natural lake   11     X   Winema N.F.
Klamath Bumphead Reservoir reservoir 15 89       Algae (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Klamath Devil Lake reservoir 19 70       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Fremont N.F.
Klamath Gerber Reservoir reservoir 65 4047 Yes - Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (2010)     Algae, Nutrients (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Klamath Hawks Lake natural lake   111     X    
Klamath Howard Prarie Reservoir reservoir 80 2070   Anabaena planctonica (1981)     U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Talent Irrig. Dist.; Jackson County Parks
Klamath Hyatt Lake reservoir 38 957 Yes - (2006)     Algae, Nutrients (need data); Listing for algae based on health advisory is proposed U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Talent Irrigation District
Klamath J.C. Boyle Reservoir reservoir 45 381       Chlorophyll a, Dissolved Oxygen, pH (TMDL Drafted); Nutrients (need data) Pacific Power and Light
Klamath Lake of the Woods natural lake 55 1146   Anabaena flos-aquae (1981)   Algae, Macrophytes, nutrients (need data) Winema N.F.
Klamath Lost River Reservoir reservoir   230       Chlorophyll a, Dissolved Oxygen, pH (TMDL Drafted); Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Klamath Obenchain Reservoir reservoir 18 65       Algae, Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients (need data) Fremont N.F.
Klamath Round Valley Reservoir reservoir 6 310       Algae, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
Klamath Spring Lake natural lake 4 419       Algae, Nutrients (need data) U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Klamath Squaw Lake (Klamath Co) natural lake   29         Winema N.F.
Klamath Upper Klamath Lake natural lake w/dam 50 61543 Yes - Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1996) Anabaena flos-aquae (1982), Anabaena circinalis (1959), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (1959,1964-68,1977,1978,1982) X Chlorophyll a, Dissolved Oxygen, pH, Nutrients (TMDL Approved)  
Klamath Willow Valley Reservoir reservoir 25 588     X Algae, Nutrients (need data) Bureau of Land Management
135 Total waters identified       40 60 40 99  

Appendix C - Summary of Specific Waterbodies with HABs

PDF 101 Pages with Tables and Figures

My Note: Need Special Table to Support Anaytics and Visualizations Besides Appendix B Table, So Designed the Table Below to Extract from Appendix C and Include Link to More Detailed Information Which can be Expanded in the Future and to be Copied to Excel Spreadsheet

            

Name County Basin Subbasin Ecoregion Type Land Use Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms
Blue Lake Multnomah County Willamette/Sandy Basin   Willamette Valley Ecoregion natural lake, now diked Water-59.4%; Ir Ag-21.4%; Urban-17.6%; Other-1.7% (park) Link
Crane Prairie Reservoir Deschutes County Deschutes Basin   Eastern Cascade Slopes and Foothills Ecoregion reservoir Forest-93.6%; Water-5.4%; Other-1% (wetlands) Link
Devils Lake Lincoln County Mid Coast Basin   Coast Range Ecoregion natural lake Forest-88.9%; Range-3.4%; Water-4.3%; Urban-3.4%; Link
Diamond Lake Douglas County Umpqua River Basin   Cascade Ecoregion natural lake, now diked Forest-88%; Water-9%; Other-3% (rock outcrops) Link
Haystack Reservoir Jefferson County Deschutes Basin   Blue Mountain Ecoregion reservoir Range-81.6%; Water-3.7%; Non Irrigated Agriculture-14.7% Link
Hyatt Reservoir Jackson County Klamath Basin   Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-73.0%; Range-9.0%; Water-18% Link
Upper Klamath Lake Klamath County Klamath Basin   Eastern Cascades Slopes & Foothills Ecoregion natural with dam Forest-72.9%; Range-13.3%; Water-3.5%; Irrigated Ag-7.6%; Other-2.5% (Wetlands) Link
Lake Oswego Clackamas County Willamette Basin   Willamette Valley Ecoregion natural lake with dam Forest-12.6%; Water-9.7%; Irrigated Ag-0.2% Non Irrig Ag-5.4%; Urban- 72.1% Link
Lake Oswego Clackamas County Willamette Basin   Willamette Valley Ecoregion natural lake with dam Forest-12.6%; Water-9.7%; Irrigated Ag-0.2% Non Irrig Ag-5.4%; Urban- 72.1% Link
Lava Lake Deschutes County Deschutes Basin   Klamath Mountain Ecoregion natural lake Forest-92.7%, Range-0.2%; Water-6.4%; Other-0.7% (wetland) Link
Lemolo Reservoir Douglas County Umpqua Basin   Cascade Mountain Ecoregion reservoir Forest-94.8%; Water-3.2%; Other-2.0% (Rock Outcrops) Link
Lost Creek Reservoir Jackson County Rogue River Basin   Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-94.5%; Range-2.3%; Water-1%; Ir Ag-0.6%; Non Ir Ag-0.1%; Urban-0.1%; Other-1% (rock outcrops) Link
Odell Lake Klamath County Deschutes Basin   Cascade Ecoregion natural lake with dam Forest-81%; Water-15%; Other-4% (rock outcrops) Link
Paulina Lake Deschutes County Deschutes Basin   Cascade Ecoregion natural lake Forest-55.5%; Water-25.7%; Other-18.9 (lava fields) Link
Elk Creek/Umpqua River Douglas County Umpqua Basin   Klamath Mountain Ecoregion river   Link
South Umpqua Below Lawson Bar Douglas County Umpqua Basin   Klamath Mountain Ecoregion river   Link
Selmac Lake Josephine County Rogue River Basin   Klamath Mountain Ecoregion reservoir Forest-94%; Range-1.7%; Water-1.8%; Ir Ag-0.5%; Non Ir Ag-1.9% Link
Siltcoos Lake Douglas County Mid Coast Basin   Coast Range Ecoregion natural lake Forest-87.9%; Range-1.3%; Water-8.7%; Non Ir Ag-1.1%; Urban-0.5%; Other-0.5% (wetland) Link
Suttle Lake Jefferson County Deschutes Basin   Cascade Ecoregion natural lake with dam Forest-90%; Range-1%; Water-2.7%; Other-3.3% (rock outcrops) Link
Tenmile Lakes Coos County South Coast Basin   Coast Range Ecoregion natural lake Forest-93%; Water-5%; Urban-2%; Link
Wapato Lake Washington County Willamette Basin   Willamette Valley Ecoregion lake National Wildlife Refuge Link
Wickiup Reservoir Deschutes County Deschutes Basin   Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-79.5%; Water-16%; Other-4.5% (rock outcrops, wetlands and lava fields) Link
Willow Lake Jackson County Rogue River Basin   Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-96%; Range-1.3%; Water-1.7%; Other-1% (rock outcrops) Link
Big Cliff Reservoir Marion/Linn County Willamette Basin North Santiam Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-98%; Water-2% Link
Detroit Reservoir Marion/Linn County Willamette Basin North Santiam Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-96.3%; Range-0.2%; Water-1.6%; Urban-0.1%; Other-1.9% (rock outcrops) Link
Green Peter Reservoir Linn County Willamette Basin South Santiam Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-98%; Water-2% Link
Foster Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin North Santiam Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-96.6%; Water-1.6%; Non Irrigated Ag-1.8% Link
Blue River Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin McKenzie Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-97.5%; Range -0.5%; Water-1.5%; Other-0.5% (rock outcrops) Link
Cougar Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin McKenzie Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-98%; Water-2% Link
Hills Creek Reservoir Lane County Willamette/Sandy Basin Middle Fork Willamette Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-98%; Water-2%; Link
Lookout Point Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin Middle Fork Willamette Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-97.7%; Water-1.8%; Non Irrigated Ag-0.5 Link
Dexter Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin Middle Fork Willamette Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-96.3%; Water-2.4%; Irrig Ag-1.2%; Urban-0.1% Link
Fall Creek Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin Middle Fork Willamette Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-93.8%; Water-1.6%; Irrig Ag-2.8% Link
Dorena Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin Coast Fork Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-97%; Water-1%; Non Irrig Ag-2% Link
Cottage Grove Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin Coast Fork Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-96.5%; Range -1%, Water-2%; Other-0.5% (rock outcrops) Link
Fern Ridge Reservoir Lane County Willamette Basin Upper Willamette Subbasin Cascade Ecoregion reservoir Forest-57.7%; Range-8%; Water-5.3%; Non Irrigated Ag-23.7%; Urban-5.3% Link

Blue Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: High background loading of nutrients from groundwater, some of which could be due to legacy cesspool loading and potentially from current groundwater pumping into the lake, and high internal loading of nutrients. Lake is naturally eutrophic but a balance is needed between macrophyte and algal management.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Blue Lake as being water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae, chlorophyll a and pH. The Health Advisories will be added as a reason for listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report. TMDL work has been initiated.

Crane Prairie Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Elevated phosphorus (source may be natural but data is needed to verify this). Non-native, introduced fish may play a key role in increasing the internal loading.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Crane Prairie Reservoir as being of concern for aquatic growth and pH but needing supporting data (Category 3 – insufficient data). Crane Prairie Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Devils Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Elevated nutrients from watershed; internal loading further enhanced by introduction of Grass Carp.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Devils Lake as being water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for chlorophyll a and pH and of concern for nutrients. A Category 5 listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on Health Advisories issued. TMDL work is being initiated.

Diamond Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Primarily internal loading of nutrients (N and P) due to the large biomass of tui chubs. The internal load of phosphorus associated with tui chub was estimated to be approximately four times the external load of phosphorus (Eilers et al, In press - 2011).

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Diamond Lake as being water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae, dissolved oxygen, pH. A TMDL has been completed and is being successfully implemented. These parameters have been identified as Category 4A (TMDL Approved) in the proposed 2010 Integrated Report.

Haystack Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Elevated nutrients, cause unknown.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Haystack Reservoir. A Category 5 (Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the Health Advisory Issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Hyatt Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Hyatt Reservoir. A Category 5 (Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the Health Advisory Issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Upper Klamath Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Excessive internal and external total phosphorus loading to the lake, considerable loss of adjacent wetland area.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Upper Klamath Lake and Agency Lake as being Water Quality Limited with an approved TMDL (Category 4A) for Chlorophyll a, dissolved oxygen and pH.

Lake Oswego

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Primarily cultural eutrophication with high phosphorus loading from both the immediate watershed and extended watershed (Tualatin Subbasin).

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Lake Oswego as being Water Quality Limited with an approved TMDL (Category 4A) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae, dissolved oxygen, pH and phosphorus.

Lake Oswego

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Primarily cultural eutrophication with high phosphorus loading from both the immediate watershed and extended watershed (Tualatin Subbasin).

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Lake Oswego as being Water Quality Limited with an approved TMDL (Category 4A) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae, dissolved oxygen, pH and phosphorus.

Lava Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Appear to be natural sources of nutrients, but internal loading may be higher due to Tui Chub.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Lava Lake as being water quality limited (303(d) list) for Dissolved Oxygen and of concern for phosphorus and pH. A Category 3 (Potential Concern) listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on Health Advisories issued. This Health Advisory was based on use of the drinking water advisory criteria (15,000 cells/ml) rather than the recreational advisory criteria (100,000 cells/ml) that is currently used. A TMDL has been initiated (scoping and data collection) for Lava Lake.

Lemolo Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: The cause is not known but non-native, introduced fish (tui chub) may play a key role in the internal recycling of nutrients. Further study of the reservoir is occurring.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not identify any concerns for Lemolo Reservoir. Lemolo Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories. Studies of Lemolo Lake have been initiated.

Lost Creek Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not identify any concerns for Lost Creek Reservoir. A Category 5 (Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the Health Advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Odell Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Elevated phosphorus (source may be natural). Non-native, introduced fish (kokanee and tui chub) may play a key role in the internal recycling of nutrients. This is still being studied.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Odell Lake as being water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for chlorophyll a and pH. A Category 5 listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on Health Advisories issued. TMDL related work has been initiated (scoping and data collection) for Odell Lake.

Paulina Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Elevated nutrients, likely natural, from the watershed and possible elevated internal loadings from introduced fish populations; additional data needed.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not identify any concerns for Paulina Lake. Paulina Lake has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Elk Creek/Umpqua River

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Multiple factors probably combined to produce conditions favorable to cyanobacteria growth in isolated, stagnant bedrock pools on the Umpqua River, including high nutrient levels, high temperature and low flow. This situation could potentially occur in sections with exposed bedrock channel and may produce HABs in isolated pools or other suitable environments under similar weather and low flow conditions.

This hypothesis is consistent with existing knowledge about conditions in the Umpqua Basin (i.e., documented in the TMDL) and recent observations at other locations with similar conditions (i.e., Lawson Bar in 2010). It is not known whether the toxin-producing cyanobacteria have recently been introduced into the system, or whether toxin producing species were already present, and the recent dog deaths were the result of random probability of exposure.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies the lower portion of Elk Creek (River Mile 0 – 6.5) as: being Water Quality Limited but not needing a TMDL for flow and habitat modification; being of potential concern but needing data for nutrients; and having a TMDL developed for dissolved oxygen, pH and E. coli. Elk Creek (River Mile 0 – 6.5) has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. A TMDL has been developed for Sediment Oxygen Demand to address low DO in Elk Creek. In the TMDL, the following was noted: “The diel swings in pH (noted in Elk Creek) are likely caused by growth of periphyton similar to the other pH analysis in this chapter which shows natural pH in the basin can be as high as 9.0 (see Calapooya Creek pH TMDL). If a pH impairment exists due to anthropogenic sources, the nonpoint source load reductions required to meet the DO standard and temperature TMDL will likely lead to nutrient reductions that result in pH attainment. If future data indicate exceedances of the pH standard, allocations and targets will be carried over from the pH TMDL for Calapooya Creek which is a similar and neighboring watershed.”

The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies the Umpqua River (River Mile 36.4 – 46.8) as: being Water Quality Limited but not needing a TMDL for flow modification; being of potential concern but needing data for nutrients; and having a TMDL developed for dissolved oxygen, pH and E. coli. The Umpqua River (River Mile 36.4 – 46.8) has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. It was felt that the phosphorus TMDL (which was developed to address pH and DO issues) for the basin did not directly address this HAB listing as it addressed nutrients in the South Umpqua and several other tributaries (Calapooya, Cow, Deer, Jackson and Steamboat Creeks) but not for the lower mainstem.

South Umpqua Below Lawson Bar

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Multiple factors probably combined to produce conditions favorable to cyanobacteria growth in isolated, stagnant bedrock pools on the Umpqua River, including high nutrient levels, high temperature and low flow. This situation could potentially occur in sections with exposed bedrock channel and may produce HABs in isolated pools or other suitable environments under similar weather and low flow conditions.

This hypothesis is consistent with existing knowledge about conditions in the Umpqua Basin (i.e., documented in the TMDL) and recent observations at other locations with similar conditions (i.e., Elk Creek and Umpqua River in 2009). It is not known whether the toxin-producing cyanobacteria have recently been recently introduced into the system, or whether toxin producing species were already present, and the recent dog deaths were the result of random probability of exposure.

Phormidium favosum is a benthic cyanopyte that lives on or within cracks in rocks. It often prefers limestone and marble substrates and has a gelatinous sheath that acts as a reservoir of water allowing it to colonize storn even when dry conditions prevail.23

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies the South Umpqua River (River Mile 36.4 – 46.8) as being: being of potential concern but needing data for flow modification; and having a TMDL developed for dissolved oxygen, pH and E. coli. The phosphorus TMDL which was developed to address pH and DO concerns in the South Umpqua River should also address the HABs issue. However, the South Umpqua River (River Mile 37.8 – 52.2) has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued but was being further reviewed at the time of this report.

Selmac Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Selmac Lake (McMullin Creek/Unnamed Lake) as being of concern for algae but needing supporting data (Category 3 – Insufficient Data). Selmac Lake has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Siltcoos Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Increased nutrients loads, both phosphorus and nitrogen, due to activities that create or transport nutrients and sediment in the watershed, on-site septic systems, loss of lowland wetlands, internal loading of nutrients due to non-native fish species, uptake of phosphorus from sediments by cyanobacterial akinetes and macrophyte decomposition.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Tenmile Lakes as being water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds or Algae. A modification to the listing has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report to note that Health Advisories have also been issued. TMDL work has been initiated.

Suttle Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Nutrients loads both externally from the watershed as well as internally from introduced fish populations are suspected.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Suttle Lake as being of concern but needing supporting data (Category 3 – Insufficient Data) for chlorophyll a, nutrients and pH. A Category 3 (Potential Concern) listing for Aquatic Weeds and Algae has been proposed in Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on Health Advisories issued. This Health Advisory was based on use of the drinking water advisory criteria (15,000 cells/ml) rather than the recreational advisory criteria (100,000 cells/ml) that is currently used. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Tenmile Lakes

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Increased nutrients loads, both phosphorus and nitrogen, due to activities that create or transport nutrients and sediment in the watershed and internal loading of nutrients due to exotic fish species and macrophytes.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Tenmile Lakes as being water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds or Algae. A TMDL has been completed and is being implemented. The lakes are proposed to be listed as Category 4A (TMDL Approved) in the 2010 Integrated Report.

Wapato Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unusual sequence of events that occurred in 2008 that resulted in water ponding on the lake bed later than the typical practice. While ponded on the peat soils of the lake bed, the water had a chance to warm up, pick up nutrients, and grow a substantial population of algae and zooplankton. Given the history of the site, a bloom was likely natural but current land and water use created a larger problem.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Wapato Lake. The Tualatin River is identified as being Water Quality Limited with an approved TMDL (Category 4A) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae, dissolved oxygen, pH and phosphorus. The lower segment (RM 0 – 10.5) of the Tualatin River was proposed for listing as 4A (Water Quality Limited, TMDL Approved) for Aquatic Weeds or Algae on the Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report to note where the advisory was issued based on the toxin data.

Wickiup Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Elevated phosphorus (source may be natural but additional data is needed). Non-native, introduced fish may play a key role in the internal loading.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Wickiup Reservoir as being of concern but needing supporting data (Category 3 – Insufficient Data) for pH. Wickiup Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae and pH in the 2010 Integrate Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Willow Lake

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Nutrients and possible fish interaction suspected but limited data.

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Willow Lake as being of concern but needing supporting data (Category 3 – Insufficient Data) for algae, dissolved oxygen and nutrients. Willow Lake is proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae on Oregon’s 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Willamette Basin Reservoir System

Willamette Basin Reservoir System

There are 13 reservoirs that were built and operated by the U. S. Corps of Engineers:

  • Detroit and Big Cliff Reservoirs in the North Santiam Subbasin;
  • Green Peter and Foster Reservoirs in the South Santiam Subbasin;
  • Cougar and Blue River Reservoirs in the McKenzie Subbasin;
  • Hills Creek, Lookout Point, Dorena and Fall Creek Reservoirs in the Middle Fork Subbasin;
  • Dexter and Cottage Grove in the Coast Fork Subbasin; and
  • Long Tom Reservoir in the Upper Willamette Subbasin.

The seven reservoirs, noted in bold above, have had a recreational Health Advisory(s) issued by the Oregon Health Authority since 2004. All 13 Willamette Reservoirs will be discussed as a unit, in part, because of the same management agency and because Landsat data was available for 10 of the reservoirs.

Big Cliff Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Blooms do not appear to be a problem

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Big Cliff Reservoir and no additional listings were proposed for the 2010 Integrated Report.

Detroit Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Detroit Reservoir as being of concern for algae but needing supporting data (Category 3 – insufficient data). Detroit Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Green Peter Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Blooms do not appear to be a problem

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Green Peter Reservoir and no additional listings were proposed for the 2010 Integrated Report.

Foster Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Blooms have not been reported to be a problem but may be a concern based on Landsat data.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Foster Reservoir and no additional listings were proposed for the 2010 Integrated Report.

Blue River Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Blue River Reservoir. Blue River Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Cougar Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time.

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Cougar Reservoir and no additional listings were proposed for the 2010 Integrated Report.

Hills Creek Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Hills Creek Reservoir. Hills Creek Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Lookout Point Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Lookout Point Reservoir as being of concern but needing supporting data (Category 3 – insufficient data) for nutrients. Lookout Point Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Dexter Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Dexter Reservoir as being of concern but needing supporting data (Category 3 – insufficient data) for nutrients. Dexter Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Fall Creek Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Fall Creek Reservoir and no additional listings were proposed for the 2010 Integrated Report.

Dorena Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any listings for Dorena Reservoir. Dorena Reservoir has been proposed for listing as water quality limited (Category 5 – Section 303(d) list – a TMDL is needed) for Aquatic Weeds and Algae in the 2010 Integrated Report based on the health advisories issued. TMDL related work has not been initiated.

Cottage Grove Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: The 2004/2006 Integrated Report does not contain any algal or nutrient related listings for Cottage Grove Reservoir and no additional listings were proposed for the 2010 Integrated Report.

Fern Ridge Reservoir

Likely or Suspected Cause of Blooms: Unknown at this time

303(d) List Status: 2004/2006 Integrated Report identifies Fern Ridge Reservoir as being of concern but needing supporting data (Category 3 – insufficient data) for algae and nutrients. No additional listings are proposed in the 2010 Integrated Report.

Appendix D - Nutrients

PDF 8 Pages with Tables, Maps, and Figures

Nutrients

The best way to control excessive algae is control the flow of nutrients into the waterbody. This appendix contains additional information regarding nutrients that was reviewed during the development of the DEQ HABs Strategy and is provided as additional background and reference material.
Nutrients, In General

Algae, cyanobacteria, and other photosynthetic organisms require over 20 elements for growth and survival (Frausto da Silva and Williams, 1991). Nitrogen (N), and especially phosphorus (P), are often in shortest supply in relation to demand in lakes; thus their concentrations often limit phytoplankton growth (Schindler et al. 2008; Lewis and Wurtzbaugh 2008). The chemical forms of N and P also play a role in the competition between phytoplankton species in lakes. For example, most algae require N as ammonium (NH4+) or nitrate (NO3-) while some cyanobacteria species can utilize dissolved N gas (N2). This gives cyanobacteria a competitive advantage when NH4+ and NO3- concentrations are depleted and P is not limiting. Because of the central role of N and P in regulating algal production and competition in lakes, water quality management is often focused on reducing N and P delivery to lakes from watersheds and sediments.

A good review of the interactive physical, chemical and biotic factors implicated in the development, proliferation and expansion of HABs can be found in Hudnell (2008) – Chapter 10: Nutrient and other environmental controls of harmful cyanobacterial blooms along the freshwater-marine continuum by Hans Paerl1. As discussed in the review, control of HABs is strongly dependent of phosphorus supply. However, additional factors, such as molar N:P supply ratios, organic matter availability, light attenuation, flushing rates (residence time) and water column stability play interactive roles in determining HAB composition (nitrogen fixing vs non-nitrogen fixing taxa) and biomass. While single nutrient input constraints may be effective in some waters, reductions of nitrogen and phosphorus are usually required for effective long-term control and management of blooms (Hudnell, 2008).

Phosphorus vs Nitrogen:

Much of the early understanding and modeling was based on the relationship of phosphorus loading to algal biomass, expressed as chlorophyll a (Vollenweider, 1968, Dillon and Rigler, 1975). Phosphorus was often found to be in the shortest supply relative to the nutritional needs of algae and therefore was limiting. Additionally, as many forms of cyanobacteria can fix nitrogen, phosphorus is also the more controllable nutrient.

A fair amount of variability existed in the earlier models and often the N:P ratio was used to explain some of the variability which brought more focus on the role of nitrogen and its role in modifying a lake’s biological response to phosphorus (e.g. Smith, 1982).
The literature is full of much research and debate about relative importance and the role of the nitrogen to phosphorus ratio for predicting and controlling algae, particularly cyanobacteria, dominance in lakes. Particularly, much of the debate centers around if low N:P ratios lead to HAB blooms and could be used as predictors of the blooms.

http://www.epa.gov/cyano_habs_sympos...graph/Ch10.pdf

Appendix E - Memo to the EPA

PDF 9 Pages with Tables and Figures

January 31, 2007

Mr. Mike Gearheard

Director Office of Water and Watersheds

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Region 10

1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 981 01

Dear Mr. Gearheard: This letter fulfills DEQ's commitment in Element 1.5 of the Water Quality component of DEQ and EPA's Performance Partnership Agreement (PPA) for 2007-2008. OEQ's commitment is to describe the state's process for controlling nutrients and protecting the designated uses of Oregon waters. On January 9, 2001, EPA announced the publication of recommended water quality criteria for nutrients under section 304(a) of the Clean Water Act to address the problem of cultural eutrophication of the nation's waters. In a memorandum dated November 14, 2001, EPA Office of Science and Technology Director Geoff Grubbs stated "Nitrogen and phosphorus are the primary causes of cultural eutrophication. The most recognizable manifestations of this cultural eutrophication are algal blooms that occur during the summer. Chronic symptoms of over-enrichment include low dissolved oxygen, fish kills, murky water, and depletion of desirable flora and fauna." EPA has encouraged states to adopt numeric nutrient criteria or to use other scientifically defensible methods and appropriate water quality data to develop criteria protective of designated uses.

Oregon has water quality criter~a( in Oregon Administrative Rules Division 41) based on scientifically defensible methods that protect designated beneficial uses from the adverse effects of excessive nutrients. These water quality criteria focus on parameters linked directly to protection of beneficial uses. In addition, Oregon has a narrative criterion that addresses excessive algal growth (a possible consequence of excessive nutrients)T. he Department is concerned that, because cultural eutrophication is influenced by many factors including sunlight, temperature, type of algae, stream flow, etc., focusing just on nutrient cnteria would limit or preclude the development of site-specific responses to water quality problems that the Department has successfully done with ~tsTo tal Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. For example, some Oregon waters have naturally high levels of nutrients such as phosphorus. Implementing a statewide nutrient criteria that is independent of how nutrients may impact beneficial uses would commit the Department's scant resources to developing controls and limits where there would be of tittle, if any, benefit, and would divert resources away from an aiready successful program that addresses real nutrient problems. The Department's TMDL program has developed effective approaches to resolve problems and establish appropriate nutrient targets In many EPA-approved TMDLs.

Appendix F - Web Research on Lawn Maintenance Fertilizers

PDF (15 Pages)

Web Research on Lawn Maintenance Fertilizers

As discussed in section 6.5.3, a number of states have restricted phosphorus in lawn maintenance fertilizers including: Illinois, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New York and Wisconsin. In Oregon, Dunes City has developed a local ordinance restricting use of any fertilizer within 50 feet of the shoreline and restricts the use of any phosphorus containing fertilizer within Dunes City (it can be used when first establishing turf and if need is shown through soil testing). Lake Oswego uses zero phosphorus fertilizer in its parks and the Lake Oswego Corporation has active educational program promoting the use of zero phosphorus lawn maintenance fertilizers when fertilizers are used. In 2011, Scotts Miracle Gro Company, a major producer of retail lawn fertilizer, announced that it was removing phosphorus from most of its lawn maintenance fertilizers by 2012.

As there are a number of lakes in urban areas and/or with residential development along the shoreline that are experiencing HABs in Oregon, it was felt that it would be good to further explore the need for phosphorus in lawn maintenance fertilizers and the availability of 0-P lawn maintenance fertilizers in Oregon. This source of phosphorus to waterbodies in urban areas can be significant as an initial study (Lehman et al, 2009) suggested that a 25% reduction in total phosphorus occurred after implementation of a lawn fertilizer ordinance in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

DEQ initially had discussions with Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) for use of fertilizer fee grant funds to explore this topic further. A conceptual proposal was submitted by the Center for Lakes and Reservoirs to the Department of Agriculture. While ODA was interested in the proposal, the project was not funded as it was felt that there was already a trend by fertilizer manufacturers to go toward 0-P lawn maintenance fertilizers and funds were needed to do further work related to the potential impact of fertilizers in the Umatilla Groundwater Management Area.

This topic was discussed further with EPA who indicated that they had an intern, Devin Groman, who had some limited time available and could do some further research on this topic. A set of questions were developed and Devin did phone and web research in the limited time that she had available.

This Appendix contains her report based on the set of questions and was edited only for clarity and format.

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