Table of contents
  1. Story
    1. Data Browser
    2. Slides
      1. Slide 1 Data Science for DataBay
      2. Slide 2 So take a look at the new data catalogue & let us know what you think
      3. Slide 3 DataBay Bibliography Catalogue
      4. Slide 4 Data Mining Process Standard
      5. Slide 5 Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup
      6. Slide 6 Data Science for DataBay: Knowledge Base in MindTouch (Wiki) 1
      7. Slide 7 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in MindTouch (Wiki)
      8. Slide 8 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 1
      9. Slide 9 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 2
      10. Slide 10 Some Conclusions and Next Steps
    3. Knowledge Base
  2. Research Notes
  3. The DataBay “Reclaim the Bay” Innovation Challenge Agenda
    1. Friday August 1
    2. Saturday August 2
    3. Sunday August 3
    4. Notes
  4. Data Bay Bibliography of Open Data Web Sites
    1. Bacteria data
    2. Bacteria data - Sampling stations
    3. Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Databases
    4. Chesapeake Bay Report Card
    5. Envirofacts
    6. EPA Developer Central
    7. Geoplatform
    8. Integrated Report Map (gdb)
    9. MD iMap GIS Data Catalog
    10. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Outfall Locations
    11. StateStat
    12. Surface Water Quality Assessment (Integrated Report)
    13. Tier II
    14. TMDL Map Center
    15. Water Quality Monitoring Sampling Locations
    16. Water Quality Monitoring Data
  5. EPA Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Watershed 2012-2013 Progress and Committments
    1. Overview
    2. 2014 Oversight Status
    3. Potential Federal Actions and Assistance
  6. Chesapeake Bay Source Documents  2014
    1. Q. What action has EPA taken?
    2. Q. What is a TMDL?
    3. Q. What are the primary elements of a TMDL?
    4. Q. Why is a TMDL being developed for the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries?
    5. Q. What are some of the features of the Bay TMDL?
    6. Q. How are the pollution limits set and what are those limits?
    7. Q. How are the Bay and its tidal tributaries impaired?
    8. Q. What are the sources of pollution?
    9. Q. How is Chesapeake Bay water quality impacted by actions on the land?
    10. Q. How long has the Bay TMDL process been underway?
    11. Q. When does the TMDL anticipate the Bay will be restored?
    12. Q. How is the Bay TMDL connected to the Presidential Executive Order to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay?
    13. Q. Will the Bay TMDL have benefits for waterways throughout the watershed?
    14. Q. There have been many TMDLs written in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. How do they relate to this Bay TMDL?
    15. Q.What is the Chesapeake Bay Program?
    16. Q. How large is the Chesapeake Bay? How big is the watershed that drains into it? How many people live within the watershed?
    17. The Executive Summary of the Final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load​
  7. NEXT

Data Science for DataBay

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
    1. Data Browser
    2. Slides
      1. Slide 1 Data Science for DataBay
      2. Slide 2 So take a look at the new data catalogue & let us know what you think
      3. Slide 3 DataBay Bibliography Catalogue
      4. Slide 4 Data Mining Process Standard
      5. Slide 5 Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup
      6. Slide 6 Data Science for DataBay: Knowledge Base in MindTouch (Wiki) 1
      7. Slide 7 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in MindTouch (Wiki)
      8. Slide 8 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 1
      9. Slide 9 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 2
      10. Slide 10 Some Conclusions and Next Steps
    3. Knowledge Base
  2. Research Notes
  3. The DataBay “Reclaim the Bay” Innovation Challenge Agenda
    1. Friday August 1
    2. Saturday August 2
    3. Sunday August 3
    4. Notes
  4. Data Bay Bibliography of Open Data Web Sites
    1. Bacteria data
    2. Bacteria data - Sampling stations
    3. Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Databases
    4. Chesapeake Bay Report Card
    5. Envirofacts
    6. EPA Developer Central
    7. Geoplatform
    8. Integrated Report Map (gdb)
    9. MD iMap GIS Data Catalog
    10. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Outfall Locations
    11. StateStat
    12. Surface Water Quality Assessment (Integrated Report)
    13. Tier II
    14. TMDL Map Center
    15. Water Quality Monitoring Sampling Locations
    16. Water Quality Monitoring Data
  5. EPA Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Watershed 2012-2013 Progress and Committments
    1. Overview
    2. 2014 Oversight Status
    3. Potential Federal Actions and Assistance
  6. Chesapeake Bay Source Documents  2014
    1. Q. What action has EPA taken?
    2. Q. What is a TMDL?
    3. Q. What are the primary elements of a TMDL?
    4. Q. Why is a TMDL being developed for the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries?
    5. Q. What are some of the features of the Bay TMDL?
    6. Q. How are the pollution limits set and what are those limits?
    7. Q. How are the Bay and its tidal tributaries impaired?
    8. Q. What are the sources of pollution?
    9. Q. How is Chesapeake Bay water quality impacted by actions on the land?
    10. Q. How long has the Bay TMDL process been underway?
    11. Q. When does the TMDL anticipate the Bay will be restored?
    12. Q. How is the Bay TMDL connected to the Presidential Executive Order to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay?
    13. Q. Will the Bay TMDL have benefits for waterways throughout the watershed?
    14. Q. There have been many TMDLs written in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. How do they relate to this Bay TMDL?
    15. Q.What is the Chesapeake Bay Program?
    16. Q. How large is the Chesapeake Bay? How big is the watershed that drains into it? How many people live within the watershed?
    17. The Executive Summary of the Final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load​
  7. NEXT

  1. Story
    1. Data Browser
    2. Slides
      1. Slide 1 Data Science for DataBay
      2. Slide 2 So take a look at the new data catalogue & let us know what you think
      3. Slide 3 DataBay Bibliography Catalogue
      4. Slide 4 Data Mining Process Standard
      5. Slide 5 Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup
      6. Slide 6 Data Science for DataBay: Knowledge Base in MindTouch (Wiki) 1
      7. Slide 7 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in MindTouch (Wiki)
      8. Slide 8 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 1
      9. Slide 9 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 2
      10. Slide 10 Some Conclusions and Next Steps
    3. Knowledge Base
  2. Research Notes
  3. The DataBay “Reclaim the Bay” Innovation Challenge Agenda
    1. Friday August 1
    2. Saturday August 2
    3. Sunday August 3
    4. Notes
  4. Data Bay Bibliography of Open Data Web Sites
    1. Bacteria data
    2. Bacteria data - Sampling stations
    3. Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Databases
    4. Chesapeake Bay Report Card
    5. Envirofacts
    6. EPA Developer Central
    7. Geoplatform
    8. Integrated Report Map (gdb)
    9. MD iMap GIS Data Catalog
    10. National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Outfall Locations
    11. StateStat
    12. Surface Water Quality Assessment (Integrated Report)
    13. Tier II
    14. TMDL Map Center
    15. Water Quality Monitoring Sampling Locations
    16. Water Quality Monitoring Data
  5. EPA Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Watershed 2012-2013 Progress and Committments
    1. Overview
    2. 2014 Oversight Status
    3. Potential Federal Actions and Assistance
  6. Chesapeake Bay Source Documents  2014
    1. Q. What action has EPA taken?
    2. Q. What is a TMDL?
    3. Q. What are the primary elements of a TMDL?
    4. Q. Why is a TMDL being developed for the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries?
    5. Q. What are some of the features of the Bay TMDL?
    6. Q. How are the pollution limits set and what are those limits?
    7. Q. How are the Bay and its tidal tributaries impaired?
    8. Q. What are the sources of pollution?
    9. Q. How is Chesapeake Bay water quality impacted by actions on the land?
    10. Q. How long has the Bay TMDL process been underway?
    11. Q. When does the TMDL anticipate the Bay will be restored?
    12. Q. How is the Bay TMDL connected to the Presidential Executive Order to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay?
    13. Q. Will the Bay TMDL have benefits for waterways throughout the watershed?
    14. Q. There have been many TMDLs written in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. How do they relate to this Bay TMDL?
    15. Q.What is the Chesapeake Bay Program?
    16. Q. How large is the Chesapeake Bay? How big is the watershed that drains into it? How many people live within the watershed?
    17. The Executive Summary of the Final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load​
  7. NEXT

Story

Data Science for DataBay: MD Water Quality Data at a Glance

Our work is available in a Data Browser (MD Water Point Source Sampling Locations, and MD Water Point Source Sample Results), Slides (10), and Knowledge Base (Data Bay Bibliography of Open Data Web Sites, Data Commons, etc.) below.

An important result is in Slide 8 where the box-plot, a powerful statistic invented by the famous mathematician and inventor of exploratory data analysis - now called data science) John Tukey, clearly shows that Nitrogen (inorganic and regular) have the largest values and outliers (spikes) in values, hence why the water quality is degraded! We have all 327,148 rows and 28 columns of data in-memory for immediate results with these dynamically linked visualizations!

Then you can select the county to see where it is the worst in Slide 9..

Neat, cool, etc.!

What is a Box Plot?​

Box plots are graphical tools to visualize key statistical measures, such as median, mean and quartiles.

A single box plot can be used to represent all the data. The individual box plot is a visual aid to examining key statistical properties of a variable. The diagram below shows how the shape of a box plot encodes these properties. The range of the vertical scale is from the minimum to the maximum value of the selected column, or, to the highest or lowest of the displayed reference points.

WhatisaBoxPlot1.png

ChallengePost

Submission: http://databay.challengepost.com/sub...y-at-a-glance/

Market your submission! What do you want to call it?

Name: Data Science for DataBay: MD Water Quality at a Glance

Explain your software in a tweetable sentence.

Tagline: Data Bay Data Browser, Slides, and Knowledge Base: https://twitter.com/bniemannsr/statu...47053406830592

Tell the story behind the code. What inspired you? Who is your target user? What key features are you most proud of?

Description:

  • Code: Wikipedia and Dr. Ben Schneiderman's pioneering work on Spotfire visualizations
  • Inspiration: Previous work on Chesapeake Bay Program data sets.
  • Target Users: Open government data users that want a Data FAIRport (FIndable, Accessible, Inteoperable, and Reusable) or Data Commons and Data Science Publications in Data Browser
  • Key Features: Automatic geocoding, dynamically linked multiple adjacent visualizations, and advanced statistics, modeling, and visualizations without coding so data is all in-memory.
  • Team: We formed a team with a senior data scientist and a senior environmental scientist from members of the Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup.
  • Data Mining: We looked at the new data catalogue & let you know what you thought about using it.
  • Technology: We have built and deployed a Knowledge Base, Data FAIRport-Data Commons, and Business Intelligence Applications on the Semantic Data Web.
  • Future: Our work on in-depth data science for the Chesapeake Bay Program and EPA EnviroAltas continues.

Want to insert an image?

Screenshots Slide 8 and Slide 9

Add a ZIP, PDF, or Word document that is part of your submission. If you would like to upload multiple files, please put them in a ZIP file and upload the ZIP file. Limit: 35 MB.

Upload a file: Slides

Provide a link to your website. Be sure to start the URL with http://

Website URL: http://semanticommunity.info/Data_Science/Data_Science_for_DataBay

Tag your submission with the platform(s) it runs on.

Built for: Desktop Windows, IOS, Mobile - Other (iPAD), Mobile - HTML, and Web

Tag your submission with APIs, libraries, data, etc. you used to build it.

Built with​ MindTouch and Spotfire are our GitHUb and they provide APIs​

In order for your submission to be valid, you must use your real name.

Name: Brand Niemann

Add team members using the email address associated with their ChallengePost account.

Team Members​: joanaron@ymail.com

I have read and agree to be bound by the official rules and the ChallengePost terms of service

Yes

Data Browser

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App 

Error: Embedded data could not be displayed. Use Google Chrome

Slides

Slides

Slide 1 Data Science for DataBay

BrandNiemann08032014Slide1.PNG

 

Slide 2 So take a look at the new data catalogue & let us know what you think

BrandNiemann08032014Slide2.PNG

Slide 3 DataBay Bibliography Catalogue

http://semanticommunity.info/@api/deki/files/30279/Data-Bay-Bibliography-1.xlsx

BrandNiemann08032014Slide3.PNG

Slide 4 Data Mining Process Standard

BrandNiemann08032014Slide4.PNG

Slide 5 Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup

http://www.meetup.com/Federal-Big-Data-Working-Group/

BrandNiemann08032014Slide5.PNG

Slide 6 Data Science for DataBay: Knowledge Base in MindTouch (Wiki) 1

http://semanticommunity.info/Data_Science/Data_Science_for_DataBay

BrandNiemann08032014Slide6.PNG

Slide 7 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in MindTouch (Wiki)

http://semanticommunity.info/Data_Science/Data_Science_for_DataBay

BrandNiemann08032014Slide7.PNG

Slide 8 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 1

BrandNiemann08032014Slide8.png

Slide 9 Data Science for DataBay: Data Commons in Spotfire (Business Intelligence) 2

BrandNiemann08032014Slide9.PNG

Slide 10 Some Conclusions and Next Steps

BrandNiemann08032014Slide10.PNG

 

Knowledge Base

Data Enthusiasts! Civic Hackers! Conservationists! We need your help!

VISUAL (FOR RELEASE)

Ahead of the Reclaim the Bay Challenge, the State of Maryland is putting together a new data catalogue. In the spirit of openness, collaboration and good ol’ transparency, the State is seeking feedback on the usefulness of these data sets:

View as a Google Doc

Download an Excel Spreadsheet My Note: I did this.

(Note: Many of the links are to web portals that have multiple bay relevant data sets available on them.)

Here’s what we’d like to find out from you:

  • Can you work with this data?
  • Are you encountering any issues with the datasets?
  • Are there relevant datasets or websites which are missing?
  • What other information would you like to see?

So take a look and let us know what you think. (Constructive negative comments are welcome.)

Thank you!

Dr. Brand Niemann's Answers to Questions Based on Spreadsheet Inventory Below

SpreadsheetInventory.png

Can you work with this data?

Yes, especially 5 sites that provide spreadsheet downloads. There are 5 sites that require a separate inventory. There are two sites that require browsing lots of data sets to make a selection. There is one site that does not appear to provide the actual data and one site that requires the user to have ArcGis software.

Are you encountering any issues with the datasets?

There are two sites that return Error Messages and one site that requires ArcGis software.

Are there relevant datasets or websites which are missing?

Probably, but there is so much to work with and so little time that can come later.

What other information would you like to see?

What I have done here as a Data Scientist to begin the Data Mining Process as follows:

Picture1.png

I imported the Water_Point_Source_Sampling_Locations.csv and Water_Point_Source_Sample_Results.csv into Spotfire and created the MD Water Point Source Sampling Locations and MD Water Point Source Sample Results Tabs.

The Instructions are in the Metadata and Navigation boxes of the Spotfire Tabs.

An important result is in Slide 8 where the box-plot, a powerful statistic invented by the famous mathematician and inventor of exploratory data analysis - now called data science) John Tukey, clearly shows that Nitrogen (inorganic and regular) have the largest values and outliers (spikes) in values, hence why the water quality is degraded! We have all 327,148 rows and 28 columns of data in-memory for immediate results with these dynamically linked visualizations!

Then you can select the county to see where it is the worst in Slide 9..

Neat, cool, etc.!

The July-August 2014 Issue of the Bay Journal contains a story: Members Join Legal Challenge to Chesapeake TMDL. See previous story:​ Members of Congress join legal challenge to Bay cleanup plan. Thus means that helping both the public and decision makers understand the TMDL data is very important. See for example: MD TMDL Maps. This is the next data set to work with for the DataBay Challenge. Also see EPA Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Watershed 2012-2013 Progress and Committments and Chesapeake Bay Source Documents  2014 for background.

MORE TO FOLLOW

Research Notes

MD TMDL Maps

Dr. Joan Aron's Suggestions:

I have been looking at some Chesapeake Bay info.  See attached descriptors of key TMDL documents and latest evaluation.
 
1)  TMDL Methodology
 
The methodology for loading estimates is not clearly stated as a source with tables.   It is a complex mix of data and models.   This makes it difficult to describe provenance.   
 
2) TMDL Results
 
The three Bay-wide pollutants of concern are nitrogen, phosphorus and sediments.  Since the Bay-wide TMDL was put forth in 2010, the first evaluation (attached) seems to me to be driven by changes in agriculture with little change in the other sources.    That's how the graph appears to me but this point is not made in the text.     
 
This background is necessary for understanding the Bay Data (esp. with regard to sources of pollution).           
 
3)  To do:
 
Think about the Bay Data exercise.  
 
Think about how to examine the potential use of Big Data in the Bay over a longer period of time as an example of Big Data for decision-makers (part of Data Commons and related efforts).   Problem:  Come up with an aspect of Big Data that makes it really compelling to use as an alternative / adjunct to the existing methods. And it has to be relatively easy to explain.

The DataBay “Reclaim the Bay” Innovation Challenge Agenda

Friday August 1

4:00 pm  Optional Tour of Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC)

              RSVP to databay.md@gmail if you wish to attend

5:00 pm  Registration

5:30 pm  Welcome and Introductions

              Inspiration from our Futurists

              Peyton Robertson (NOAA), Anthony Musalacchi (UMD)

              Challenge Overview

7:00 pm  Dinner

              Team Formation + Start Working

10:00 pm Doors Close

Saturday August 2

9:00 am   Breakfast

9:30 am   Idea Pitches

10:30 am  Optional Tutorials (10 min each)

               Socrata, iMap, EPA APIs

12:30 pm  Lunch

               Optional Trail Walk

3:00 pm   Team Check-In

5:30 pm   Dinner

10:00 pm Doors Close  

Sunday August 3

9:00 am    Breakfast

10:00 am  Team Submissions Due

10:30 am  Team Presentations + Judging

12:00 pm  Lunch

                Finalists Announced + Prizes

2:00 pm    Doors Close

Notes

There are no overnight accommodations for this event, but there are several hotels within 20 minutes of SERC.

Looking for an idea to work on? Check out the challenges at databay-challenges.splashthat.com or explore the datasets at  databay-data.splashthat.com. Environmental and technical consultants will be available to help teams during the event.

Teams will be using ChallengePost to submit their entries. You can get a head start by visiting databay.challengepost.com to create a ChallengePost account and registering for this challenge. If you are looking for teammates, use the “Registrants" tab to connect with others, or you can join a team at the event.

Please read the Tech Notes and the FAQ on databay.splashthat.com for important reminders. If you need an ethernet adapter to connect to a wired network, please bring one. We will have a few to loan.

All events will take place in the Mathias Laboratory on the Main Campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) - 647 Contees Wharf Road, Edgewater, MD, 21037.  There will be signs to guide you.

Working off-site is permitted, but we encourage teams to work on-site and take advantage of the team consultants and tutorials that will be available. Team presentations on Sunday must be done on-site.

We look forward to seeing you this weekend!

Sincerely,

The DataBay Team

databay.splashthat.com

@databay_md

Data Bay Bibliography of Open Data Web Sites

Source: http://hackbaltimore.org/wp-content/...ography-1.xlsx (Excel)

Web Site Name Agency URL Comment
Bacteria data MDE URL Contains the results of the samplings from the shellfish harvesting waters sampling program. The State monitors fecal coliform levels as a requirement of the National Shellfish Sanitation Program (NSSP). The Department of the Environment is responsible for classifying and managing Maryland’s shellfish harvesting areas. The goal of shellfish harvesting area classification and management is to provide maximum utilization of shellfish resources and to reduce the risk of shellfish-borne illness. This dataset covers the time period from 2000 to 2012.
Bacteria data - Sampling stations MDE URL This dataset contains the station ID, station name, and location for the shellfish harvesting waters sampling program. Results can be found in the Shellfish Harvesting Waters Sampling Data for 2000 - 2012 dataset.
Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Databases CBP URL Contains several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. It contains water quality data from 1984 to the present, toxics database, water quality database from 1949 to 1982, among many other Chesapeake Bay and environment related data.

FYI - Data from DNR is added to the the Chesapeake Bay water quality database
Chesapeake Bay Report Card UMCES URL Contains a detailed annual assessment of Chesapeake Bay health
Envirofacts EPA URL Contains environmental information from a variety of databases. The user can retrieve Information about hazardous waste, toxic and aire releases, and water discharge permits along with much more.
EPA Developer Central EPA URL Contains resources for developers who are interested in building applications using EPA's data and web services.
Geoplatform FGDC URL Contains a collection of Federal geospatial data.
Integrated Report Map (gdb) MDE URL The Integrated Report combines two water quality reports required under sections 305(b) and 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act. This requires Maryland to perform annual water quality assessments to determine the status of jurisdictional waters and to identify waters assessed as not meeting water quality standards.
MD iMap GIS Data Catalog DoIT URL Searches for data and geographic content that have been included in MD iMap, Maryland Enterprise GIS.
National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Outfall Locations MDE URL Shows National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) facility outfall locations
Socrata StateStat URL Maryland's Open Data Portal. Contains data produced by Maryland state government both in a spatial and non-spatial format.
Surface Water Quality Assessment (Integrated Report) MDE URL The Integrated Report combines two water quality reports required under sections 305(b) and 303(d) of the federal Clean Water Act. This requires Maryland to perform annual water quality assessments to determine the status of jurisdictional waters and to identify waters assessed as not meeting water quality standards.
Tier II MDE URL Shows Maryland's Tier II high quality waters and their associated catchments
TMDL Map Center MDE URL Search for data and resources related to TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Load).
Water Quality Monitoring Sampling Locations MDE URL Contains descriptive information on sampling locations for the water point source sampling result data
Water Quality Monitoring Data MDE URL This data set contains results for nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen that may impact water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. This dataset covers the time period from 2008 to 2013.

Bacteria data

URL CSV (172 MB)

Bacteria data.png

Bacteria data - Sampling stations

URL CSV (78 KB)

Bacteria data - Sampling stations.png

Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Databases

URL My Note: Need Separate Inventory. See my previous work on Chesapeake Bay Program

Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Databases.png

Chesapeake Bay Report Card

URL My Note: Data?

Chesapeake Bay Report Card.png

Envirofacts

URL My Note: Need Separate Inventory. See my previous work on EPA Envirofacts

Envirofacts.png

EPA Developer Central

URL My Note: See EPA Environmental Data Gateway Download (I have used this before)

EPA Developer Central.png

Geoplatform

URL My Note: 82,094 datasets found

Geoplatform.png

Integrated Report Map (gdb)

URL My Note: The user must have ESRI's ArcGIS 9.3 or a later version installed on their computer

Integrated Report Map (gdb).png

MD iMap GIS Data Catalog

URL My Note: Need separate inventory (Spreadsheet, KML, Shape, and API)

MD iMap GIS Data Catalog.png

National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Outfall Locations

URL My Note: Error Message. Found: http://geodata.md.gov/imap/rest/services, but ArcGIS

National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Facility Outfall Locations.png

StateStat

URL My Note: Browse 389 data sets.

StateStat.png

Surface Water Quality Assessment (Integrated Report)

URL CSV (354 KB)

Surface Water Quality Assessment (Integrated Report).png

Tier II

URL My Note: Error Message.

Tier II.png

TMDL Map Center

URL My Note: Need separate inventory. See: http://mde.maryland.gov/programs/Wat.../TMDLMaps.aspx

TMDL Map Center.png

Water Quality Monitoring Sampling Locations

URL CSV (30 KB)

Water Quality Monitoring Sampling Locations.png

Water Quality Monitoring Data

URL CSV (36.9 MB)

Water Quality Monitoring Data.png

EPA Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Watershed 2012-2013 Progress and Committments

Source: PDF

Overview

factsheet_OverallChesBayJune2014Page1.png

2014 Oversight Status

factsheet_OverallChesBayJune2014Page2.png

Potential Federal Actions and Assistance

factsheet_OverallChesBayJune2014Page3.png

Chesapeake Bay Source Documents  2014

Source: Word

http://www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/tmdl/ChesapeakeBay/FrequentlyAskedQuestions.html

Q. What action has EPA taken?

A. On December 29, 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), a historic and comprehensive “pollution diet” with rigorous accountability measures to initiate sweeping actions to restore clean water in the Chesapeake Bay and the region’s streams, creeks and rivers.

Q. What is a TMDL?

A. The Clean Water Act (CWA) sets an overarching environmental goal that all waters in the United States be “fishable” and “swimmable.” More specifically it requires states and the District of Columbia to establish appropriate uses for their waters and adopt water quality standards that are protective of those uses. The CWA also requires that every two years jurisdictions develop – with EPA approval – a list of waterways that are impaired by pollutants and do not meet water quality standards. For those waterways identified on the impaired list, a TMDL must be developed. A TMDL is essentially a “pollution diet” that identifies the maximum amount of a pollutant the waterway can receive and still meet water quality standards.

Q. What are the primary elements of a TMDL?

A. The primary elements of a TMDL are “wasteload allocations” for “point sources” like sewage treatment plants, urban stormwater systems and large animal feeding operations, and “load allocations” for “non point sources” such as runoff from agricultural lands and nonregulated stormwater from urban and suburban lands. There is also a margin of safety built in.

Q. Why is a TMDL being developed for the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries?

A. Despite extensive restoration efforts during the last 25 years, the Bay TMDL was prompted by insufficient progress and continued poor water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries. The TMDL is required under the federal Clean Water Act and responds to consent decrees in Virginia and the District of Columbia from the late 1990s. It is also a keystone commitment of a federal strategy to meet President Obama’s Executive Order 13508 to restore and protect the Bay.

Q. What are some of the features of the Bay TMDL?

A. More than 40,000 TMDLs have been completed across the United States, but the Chesapeake Bay TMDL will be the largest and most complex thus far – it is designed to achieve significant reductions in nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment pollution throughout a 64,000-square-mile watershed that includes the District of Columbia and large sections of six states. The TMDL is actually a combination of 92 smaller TMDLs for individual Chesapeake Bay tidal segments and includes pollution limits that are sufficient to meet state water quality standards for dissolved oxygen, water clarity, underwater Bay grasses and chlorophyll-a, an indicator of algae levels.

Q. How are the pollution limits set and what are those limits?

A. The TMDL sets pollution limits necessary to meet applicable water quality standards in the Bay and its tidal rivers. Specifically, the TMDL set Bay watershed limits of 185.9 million pounds of nitrogen, 12.5 million pounds of phosphorus, and 6.45 billion pounds of sediment per year. That represents a 25 percent reduction in nitrogen, 24 percent reduction in phosphorus and 20 percent reduction in sediment. These pollution limits are further divided by jurisdiction and major river basin based on state-of-the-art modeling tools, extensive monitoring data, peer-reviewed science, and close interaction with jurisdiction partners.

Q. How are the Bay and its tidal tributaries impaired?

A. Most of the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal waters are listed as impaired because of excess nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment. These pollutants cause algae blooms that consume oxygen and create “dead zones” where fish and shellfish cannot survive, block sunlight that is needed for underwater Bay grasses, and smother aquatic life on the bottom.

Q. What are the sources of pollution?

A. The high levels of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment enter the water from a variety of sources, including agricultural operations, urban and suburban runoff, wastewater facilities, onsite septic systems, air pollution, and other sources.

Q. How is Chesapeake Bay water quality impacted by actions on the land?

A. The Bay watershed is 16 times the size of the Bay, a ratio much higher than any other comparable watershed in the world. That characteristic makes the Bay highly susceptible to actions taken on the land, including those associated with agriculture, development, transportation and wastewater treatment.

Q. How long has the Bay TMDL process been underway?

A. Since 2000, the seven jurisdictions in the Chesapeake Bay watershed (Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia) EPA, and the Chesapeake Bay Commission, which are partners in the Chesapeake Bay Program, have been planning for a Chesapeake Bay TMDL. Since September 2005, the seven jurisdictions have been actively involved in decision-making to develop the TMDL. During the October 2007 meeting of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s Principals’ Staff Committee, the Bay watershed jurisdictions and EPA agreed that EPA would establish the multi-state TMDL. Since 2008, EPA has sent official letters to the jurisdictions detailing all facets of the TMDL, including: nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment allocations, schedules for developing the TMDL and pollution reduction plans; EPA’s expectations and evaluation criteria for jurisdiction plans to meet the TMDL pollution limits; reasonable assurance for controlling non point source pollution; and backstop actions that EPA could take to ensure progress.

Q. When does the TMDL anticipate the Bay will be restored?

A. The TMDL is designed to ensure that all pollution control measures needed to fully restore the Bay and its tidal rivers are in place by 2025, with practices in place by 2017 to meet 60 percent of the necessary pollution reductions. While it will take years after 2025 for the Bay and its tributaries to fully heal, EPA expects some areas of the Bay will recover before others and there will be gradual and continued improvement in water quality as controls are put in place around the watershed.

Q. How is the Bay TMDL connected to the Presidential Executive Order to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay?

A. President Obama issued Executive Order 13508 on May 12, 2009, which directed the federal government to lead a renewed effort to restore and protect the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. The Chesapeake Bay TMDL is a keystone commitment in the strategy developed by federal agencies to meet the President’s Executive Order.

Q. Will the Bay TMDL have benefits for waterways throughout the watershed?

A. The pollution controls employed to meet the TMDL will have significant benefits for water quality in the tens of thousands of streams, creeks and rivers throughout the region, improving waterways that support local economies and livelihoods, and are used for fishing, swimming, boating, and often as a source of drinking water.

Q. There have been many TMDLs written in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. How do they relate to this Bay TMDL?

A. Previously-approved TMDLs were established to protect local waters.  While some were based on reducing nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment, many were for other pollutants.  In contrast, the Bay TMDL is based on protecting the Bay and its tidal waters from excessive nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment.  For waters that have both local TMDLs and Bay TMDLs for nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment, the more stringent of the TMDLs will apply.

Q.What is the Chesapeake Bay Program?

A. The Chesapeake Bay Program includes the signers of the original 1983 Chesapeake Bay Agreement – the jurisdictions of Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia; EPA, representing the federal government; and the Chesapeake Bay Commission, representing Bay jurisdiction legislators. It also includes the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the headwater jurisdictions of Delaware, New York and West Virginia. The Program is led by the Chesapeake Executive Council, which includes the EPA Administrator, the governors of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, the mayor of the District of Columbia, and the chair of the Chesapeake Bay Commission. The Principals’ Staff Committee, which includes the EPA Region 3 Administrator, state secretaries and others, serves as an advisory body to the Executive Council.

Q. How large is the Chesapeake Bay? How big is the watershed that drains into it? How many people live within the watershed?

A. The Bay itself is about 200 miles long, home to more than 3,700 species of plants, fish and other animals. The Bay watershed totals about 64,000 square miles, covering parts of six states and the District of Columbia. It stretches from Cooperstown, New York, to Norfolk, Virginia. Nearly 17 million people live in the watershed, and the population is growing by more than 130,000 each year.

The Executive Summary of the Final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load​

http://www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/tmdl/ChesapeakeBay/tmdlexec.html

Executive Summary — The Executive Summary of the Final Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) outlines the Bay TMDL background, development, accountability features and allocations. ... Read the Executive Summary (14pg, 608K)

Chesapeake Bay TMDL - Sections 1 through 14

http://www.epa.gov/chesapeakebaytmdl/

Chesapeake Bay TMDL

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