Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Data Science for the American Community Survey
    2. Slide 2 American Community Survey: Home Page
    3. Slide 3 American Community Survey: Data
    4. Slide 4 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 1
    5. Slide 5 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 2
    6. Slide 6 ACS Data Tables on American FactFinder
    7. Slide 7 American FactFinder: Social Characteristics in the United States
    8. Slide 8 Spreadsheet: ACS DP02
    9. Slide 9 CensusACS-Spotfire: ACS DP02
    10. Slide 10 Industry and Occupation: Table Packages
    11. Slide 11 CensusACS-Spotfire: Table Packages
    12. Slide 12 In Summary…
    13. Slide 13 American Community Survey (ACS)
    14. Slide 14 ACS Information Guide
    15. Slide 15 How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community
    16. Slide 16 Measuring America: Your Answers-Your Future
    17. Slide 17 ACS Data Science Knowledge Base
    18. Slide 18 Data Science for American Community Survey
    19. Slide 19 Spreadsheet: Knowledge Base
    20. Slide 20 CensusACS-Spotfire: Cover Page
    21. Slide 21 ACS Data Science Data Publication
    22. Slide 22 Additional Goal and Overall Purpose
    23. Slide 23 Census Data
    24. Slide 24 Data Visualization Gallery
    25. Slide 25 Spreadsheet: Gallery Index
    26. Slide 26 Where do college graduates work?
    27. Slide 27 stem_data_table
    28. Slide 28 CensusACS-Spotfire: Visualization Gallery Index
    29. Slide 29 CensusACS-Spotfire: Where do college graduates work?
    30. Slide 30 Conclusions and Recommendations
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
    1. Introduction to the American Community Survey
    2. DataFerrett
    3. RFP Excerpts
    4. Short Bio
    5. Principal Accomplishments for Census Bureau/Department of Commerce
    6. Data Science for the American Community Survey
      1. Top Topics
      2. Top Banner
      3. Bottom Banner
        1. About Us
        2. Find Data
        3. Business & Industry
        4. People & Households
        5. Special Topics
        6. Newsroom
    7. Next
  5. American Community Survey
    1. About the Survey
    2. Respond to the Survey
    3. News & Updates
    4. Data
    5. Guidance for Data Users
    6. Geography & ACS
    7. Technical Documentation
    8. Methodology
    9. Library
    10. Operations and Administration
    11. Contact Us
  6. View All Data
    1. New Data Every Year!
    2. Tables & Tools
    3. Other Data Options
      1. Summary File Data
        1. Data Folder
        2. Documentation Folder
          1. Geography Folder
          2. 5-Year Geo Folder
          3. Tech Docs Folder
          4. User Tools Folder
        3. Templates
        4. DVD Set
      2. API (Application Programming Interface)
        1. About this Section
          1. Related Information
      3. PUMS Data
        1. Introduction
        2. Confidentiality of PUMS
        3. Why Use PUMS?
        4. What's Available and How Can I Access PUMS?
        5. Need Help with PUMS?
        6. Geographic Areas Available
      4. Archived Data via FTP
      5. Custom Tables
      6. Restricted-Use Microdata
  7. ACS Information Guide
    1. A Message From the Director
    2. Introduction
    3. Short History of the ACS
    4. Importance of Participating in the ACS
    5. Who Uses the ACS and Why?
      1. Federal Agencies
      2. State and Local Agencies
      3. Nongovernmental organizations
      4. Emergency Planners
      5. American Indians and Alaska Natives
      6. Businesses
      7. Educators
      8. Journalists
      9. Public
    6. How the ACS Works for Your Community
      1. How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community
        1. Collection
        2. Processing and Dissemination
        3. Data-Driven Decisions
        4. United States Census Bureau
    7. ACS Subjects and Data Products
      1. Key ACS Data Products
        1. Data profiles
        2. Comparison Profiles
        3. Selected population profiles
        4. Ranking tables
        5. Detailed tables
        6. Geographic comparison tables
        7. Summary files
        8. Public Use Microdata Sample files
      2. Population
      3. Housing
    8. How ACS Data Are Collected
      1. Overview
      2. Address Selection
      3. Address Contacted by Mail
      4. Telephone Follow-Up for Surveys Not Completed
      5. Personal Visit Follow-Up for Surveys Not Completed or Addresses With Post Office Box Mail Delivery
      6. Personal Visit for People Living in Group Housing
      7. Telephone Follow-Up for Forms Returned Incomplete
    9. The U.S. Constitution, Title 13, and the ACS
    10. The U.S. Census Bureau Oath of Nondisclosure
    11. The Essential Role of the ACS
    12. The ACS Compass Products: Handbooks
      1. General Users
      2. Business
      3. Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS)
      4. State and Local Governments
      5. Media
    13. The ACS Compass Products: Online Tutorial
    14. The ACS Compass Products: Presentations
    15. Why Does the ACS Ask
      1. About income?
      2. About home value?
      3. When someone leaves home to go to work?
      4. About race?
      5. About disabilities?
      6. About health insurance?
      7. About kitchen facilities, telephone service, running water, and flush toilets?
    16. Frequently Asked Respondent Questions
      1. Do I have to respond to the ACS?
      2. Someone came to my home to interview me for the ACS. Is this legitimate?
      3. Why was my address selected for the ACS?
      4. What if I don't know the exact answer to an ACS question?
      5. I am concerned about identity theft. How does the Census Bureau protect my ACS information?
      6. Doesn't the government already have the information requested on the ACS?
    17. Find Out More About Your Community Through New Tools for the ACS
      1. QuickFacts
      2. APIs
      3. Easy Stats
      4. American FactFinder
      5. DataFerrett
    18. Four Ways to Find Help With ACS Statistics
      1. Ask Census
      2. Partnership and Data Services
      3. Customer Service
      4. ACS Web site
    19. Contact Information
      1. How do I complete the survey online?
      2. How do I complete the paper form?
      3. Did the Census Bureau call me?
      4. Did the Census Bureau visit me?
    20. U.S. Census Bureau Regional Offices
      1. Atlanta
      2. Chicago
      3. Denver
      4. Los Angeles
      5. New York
      6. Philadelphia
  8. How the ACS Works
  9. Your Answers, Your Future
    1. Measuring America
  10. News
    1. New Census Bureau Infographic Shows How Communities Rely on the ACS
    2. Census Bureau Releases New Median Earnings by Detailed Occupations
      1. Table Packages
    3. 17 Percent Have Said ‘I Do’ More Than Once, Census Bureau Reports
      1. 17 Percent Have Said ‘I Do’ More Than Once, Census Bureau Reports
      2. Remarriage in the United States
        1. Introduction
          1. Figure 1 American Community Survey Questions on Marital History
        2. How Many Men and Women Had Married More Than Once?
          1. Table 1 Marital History for People 15 Years Old and Over by Age and Sex: 2008–2012
        3. What Are the Characteristics of Those Who Had Married More Than Once?
          1. Figure 2. Percentage of Men Married Three Times or More by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008–2012
          2. Figure 3. Percentage of Women Married Three Times or More by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008–2012
          3. Table 2. Characteristics of People 15 Years Old and Over by Times Married: 2008–2012
        4. Has the Portion of Adults Who Remarry Increased Over Time?
          1. Table 3. Marital History by Sex for Selected Birth Cohorts, 1940 to 1944 Through 1975 to 1979: 2008–2012 1
        5. How Many Marriages Include One or Both Spouses Who Had Previously Married?
          1. Table 4. Number of Times Married for Currently Married Wives and Their Husbands: 2008–2012 1
        6. How Does the Percentage of Adults Who Had Married two or More Times Vary Geography?
          1. Figure 4. Percentage of Ever–Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by State: 2008–2012
          2. Table 5. Selected Metropolitan Statistical Areas With Among the Highest and Lowest Percentages of Ever-Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times: 2008–2012 1
          3. Figure 5. Percentage of Ever–Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–2012
        7. Summary and Conclusions
        8. Source of the Data
        9. Accuracy of the Estimates
        10. More Information
        11. Suggested Citation
        12. Contacts
        13. Appendix
          1. Appendix Table A. Margins of Error1 for Table 1 Estimates—Marital History for People 15 Years Old and Over by Age and Sex: 2008–2012
          2. Appendix Table B. Margins of Error1 for Table 2 Estimates—Characteristics of People 15 Years Old and Over by Times Married: 2008–2012
          3. Appendix Table C. Margins of Error1 for Table 3 Estimates—Marital History by Sex for Selected Birth Cohorts, 1940 to 1944 Through 1975 to 1979: 2008–20122
          4. Appendix Table D. Margins of Error1 for Table 4 Estimates—Number of Times Married for Currently Married Wives and Their Husbands: 2008–20122
          5. Appendix Table E. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by State: 2008–2012 1
          6. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          7. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          8. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          9. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          10. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          11. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          12. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          13. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
        14. Footnotes
          1. 1
          2. 2
          3. 3
          4. 4
          5. 5
          6. 6
          7. 7
          8. 8
          9. 9
          10. 10
          11. 11
          12. 12
          13. 13
          14. 14
          15. 15
          16. 16
          17. 17
          18. 18
          19. 19
          20. 20
          21. 21
          22. 22
          23. 23
          24. 24
          25. 25
          26. 26
          27. 27
          28. 28
          29. 29
          30. 30
          31. 31
          32. 32
          33. 33
          34. 34
          35. 35
          36. 36
          37. 37
          38. 38
          39. 39
    4. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Receipt for Households
      1. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households: 2000-2013
        1. Introduction
        2. SNAP Receipt: 2012-2013
          1. Figure 1 Percentage of Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits for the United States and Puerto Rico: 2013
        3. SNAP Receipt: 2000-2013
        4. SNAP Receipt in Metropolitan Areas
          1. Table 1 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt in the Past 12 Months for Households by State and Puerto Rico: 2012 and 2013
          2. Figure 2 Percentage of Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits: 2000−2013
        5. Source and Accuracy
          1. Table 2 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households by State: 2000–2013
          2. Table 3 Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits in the Past 12 Months for Top 25 Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 2012 and 2013
        6. What Is The American Community Survey?
        7. Appendix Table 1 Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits in the Past 12 Months by State: 2000–2013
  11. 2013 Subject Definitions
    1. General Information
    2. Living Quarters
      1. Housing Unit
      2. Group Quarters
    3. Housing Variables
      1. Acreage (Cuerda)
      2. Agricultural Sales
      3. Bedrooms
      4. Business on Property
      5. Computer and Internet Use
      6. Condominium Status and Fee
      7. Contract Rent
      8. Food Stamp/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits (SNAP)
      9. Gross Rent
      10. Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income
      11. Homeowner Vacancy Rate
      12. House Heating Fuel
      13. Household Size
      14. Housing Units
      15. Insurance for Fire, Hazard, and Flood
      16. Internet Use
      17. Kitchen Facilities
      18. Meals Included in Rent
      19. Mobile Home Costs
      20. Monthly Housing Costs
      21. Monthly Housing Costs as a Percentage of Household Income
      22. Mortgage Payment
      23. Mortgage Status
      24. Occupants Per Room
      25. Occupied Housing Units
      26. Owner-Occupied Units
      27. Plumbing Facilities
      28. Population in Occupied Housing Units
      29. Poverty Status of Households
      30. Real Estate Taxes
      31. Rent Asked
      32. Rental Vacancy Rate
      33. Renter-Occupied Housing Units
      34. Rooms
      35. Second or Junior Mortgage Payments or Home Equity Loan
      36. Selected Conditions
      37. Selected Monthly Owner Costs
      38. Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income
      39. Specified Owner-Occupied Units
      40. Specified Renter-Occupied Units
      41. Telephone Service Available
      42. Tenure
      43. Units in Structure
      44. Utilities
      45. Vacancy Status
      46. Vacant – Current Residence Elsewhere
      47. Vacant Housing Units
      48. Value
      49. Vehicles Available
      50. Year Householder Moved into Unit
      51. Year Structure Built
    4. Population Variables
      1. Ability to Speak English
      2. Age
      3. Ancestry
      4. Children Ever Born
      5. Citizenship Status (U.S. Citizenship Status)
      6. Class of Worker
      7. Disability Status
      8. Educational Attainment
      9. Employment Status
      10. Families
      11. Fertility
      12. Field of Degree
      13. Foreign-Born Population
      14. Foster Children
      15. Grade in Which Enrolled
      16. Grandparents as Caregivers
      17. Group Quarters (GQ)
      18. Health Insurance Coverage
      19. Hispanic or Latino Origin
      20. Household
      21. Household Type and Relationship
      22. Household Size
      23. Householder
      24. Immigrants
      25. Income in the Past 12 Months
      26. Industry
      27. Journey to Work
      28. Labor Force Status
      29. Language Spoken at Home
      30. Marital Status/Marital History
      31. Means of Transportation to Work
      32. Migration
      33. Native Population
      34. Nativity
      35. Nativity of Parent
      36. Occupation
      37. Own Children
      38. Period of Military Service
      39. Persons in Family
      40. Persons in Household
      41. Place of Birth
      42. Place of Work
      43. Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months
      44. Private Vehicle Occupancy
      45. Race
      46. Reference Week
      47. Relatives and Nonrelatives
      48. Residence 1 Year Ago
      49. School Enrollment and Type of School
      50. Sex
      51. Social Security Income
      52. Subfamily
      53. Time Leaving Home to Go to Work
      54. Travel Time to Work
      55. Type of School
      56. Usual Hours Worked in the Past 12 Months
      57. Veteran Status
      58. Weeks Worked in the Past 12 Months
      59. Work Experience
      60. Work Status in the Past 12 Months
      61. Year of Entry
    5. Derived Measures
      1. Aggregate
      2. Average
      3. Gini Index
      4. Interpolation
      5. Mean
      6. Median
      7. Percentage
      8. Quartile
      9. Quintile
      10. Rate
      11. Ratio
    6. Quality Measures
      1. General Information
      2. Sample Size
      3. Coverage Rates
      4. Response Rates
      5. Imputation Rates
    7. Appendix A
      1. Field of Degree Classification
      2. Four Main Group Classifications and Thirty-Nine Subgroup Classifications of Languages Spoken at Home with Illustrative Examples
      3. Poverty Factors
      4. Poverty Thresholds
      5. Race Combinations
      6. Median Standard Distributions

Data Science for American Community Survey

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Data Science for the American Community Survey
    2. Slide 2 American Community Survey: Home Page
    3. Slide 3 American Community Survey: Data
    4. Slide 4 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 1
    5. Slide 5 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 2
    6. Slide 6 ACS Data Tables on American FactFinder
    7. Slide 7 American FactFinder: Social Characteristics in the United States
    8. Slide 8 Spreadsheet: ACS DP02
    9. Slide 9 CensusACS-Spotfire: ACS DP02
    10. Slide 10 Industry and Occupation: Table Packages
    11. Slide 11 CensusACS-Spotfire: Table Packages
    12. Slide 12 In Summary…
    13. Slide 13 American Community Survey (ACS)
    14. Slide 14 ACS Information Guide
    15. Slide 15 How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community
    16. Slide 16 Measuring America: Your Answers-Your Future
    17. Slide 17 ACS Data Science Knowledge Base
    18. Slide 18 Data Science for American Community Survey
    19. Slide 19 Spreadsheet: Knowledge Base
    20. Slide 20 CensusACS-Spotfire: Cover Page
    21. Slide 21 ACS Data Science Data Publication
    22. Slide 22 Additional Goal and Overall Purpose
    23. Slide 23 Census Data
    24. Slide 24 Data Visualization Gallery
    25. Slide 25 Spreadsheet: Gallery Index
    26. Slide 26 Where do college graduates work?
    27. Slide 27 stem_data_table
    28. Slide 28 CensusACS-Spotfire: Visualization Gallery Index
    29. Slide 29 CensusACS-Spotfire: Where do college graduates work?
    30. Slide 30 Conclusions and Recommendations
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
    1. Introduction to the American Community Survey
    2. DataFerrett
    3. RFP Excerpts
    4. Short Bio
    5. Principal Accomplishments for Census Bureau/Department of Commerce
    6. Data Science for the American Community Survey
      1. Top Topics
      2. Top Banner
      3. Bottom Banner
        1. About Us
        2. Find Data
        3. Business & Industry
        4. People & Households
        5. Special Topics
        6. Newsroom
    7. Next
  5. American Community Survey
    1. About the Survey
    2. Respond to the Survey
    3. News & Updates
    4. Data
    5. Guidance for Data Users
    6. Geography & ACS
    7. Technical Documentation
    8. Methodology
    9. Library
    10. Operations and Administration
    11. Contact Us
  6. View All Data
    1. New Data Every Year!
    2. Tables & Tools
    3. Other Data Options
      1. Summary File Data
        1. Data Folder
        2. Documentation Folder
          1. Geography Folder
          2. 5-Year Geo Folder
          3. Tech Docs Folder
          4. User Tools Folder
        3. Templates
        4. DVD Set
      2. API (Application Programming Interface)
        1. About this Section
          1. Related Information
      3. PUMS Data
        1. Introduction
        2. Confidentiality of PUMS
        3. Why Use PUMS?
        4. What's Available and How Can I Access PUMS?
        5. Need Help with PUMS?
        6. Geographic Areas Available
      4. Archived Data via FTP
      5. Custom Tables
      6. Restricted-Use Microdata
  7. ACS Information Guide
    1. A Message From the Director
    2. Introduction
    3. Short History of the ACS
    4. Importance of Participating in the ACS
    5. Who Uses the ACS and Why?
      1. Federal Agencies
      2. State and Local Agencies
      3. Nongovernmental organizations
      4. Emergency Planners
      5. American Indians and Alaska Natives
      6. Businesses
      7. Educators
      8. Journalists
      9. Public
    6. How the ACS Works for Your Community
      1. How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community
        1. Collection
        2. Processing and Dissemination
        3. Data-Driven Decisions
        4. United States Census Bureau
    7. ACS Subjects and Data Products
      1. Key ACS Data Products
        1. Data profiles
        2. Comparison Profiles
        3. Selected population profiles
        4. Ranking tables
        5. Detailed tables
        6. Geographic comparison tables
        7. Summary files
        8. Public Use Microdata Sample files
      2. Population
      3. Housing
    8. How ACS Data Are Collected
      1. Overview
      2. Address Selection
      3. Address Contacted by Mail
      4. Telephone Follow-Up for Surveys Not Completed
      5. Personal Visit Follow-Up for Surveys Not Completed or Addresses With Post Office Box Mail Delivery
      6. Personal Visit for People Living in Group Housing
      7. Telephone Follow-Up for Forms Returned Incomplete
    9. The U.S. Constitution, Title 13, and the ACS
    10. The U.S. Census Bureau Oath of Nondisclosure
    11. The Essential Role of the ACS
    12. The ACS Compass Products: Handbooks
      1. General Users
      2. Business
      3. Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS)
      4. State and Local Governments
      5. Media
    13. The ACS Compass Products: Online Tutorial
    14. The ACS Compass Products: Presentations
    15. Why Does the ACS Ask
      1. About income?
      2. About home value?
      3. When someone leaves home to go to work?
      4. About race?
      5. About disabilities?
      6. About health insurance?
      7. About kitchen facilities, telephone service, running water, and flush toilets?
    16. Frequently Asked Respondent Questions
      1. Do I have to respond to the ACS?
      2. Someone came to my home to interview me for the ACS. Is this legitimate?
      3. Why was my address selected for the ACS?
      4. What if I don't know the exact answer to an ACS question?
      5. I am concerned about identity theft. How does the Census Bureau protect my ACS information?
      6. Doesn't the government already have the information requested on the ACS?
    17. Find Out More About Your Community Through New Tools for the ACS
      1. QuickFacts
      2. APIs
      3. Easy Stats
      4. American FactFinder
      5. DataFerrett
    18. Four Ways to Find Help With ACS Statistics
      1. Ask Census
      2. Partnership and Data Services
      3. Customer Service
      4. ACS Web site
    19. Contact Information
      1. How do I complete the survey online?
      2. How do I complete the paper form?
      3. Did the Census Bureau call me?
      4. Did the Census Bureau visit me?
    20. U.S. Census Bureau Regional Offices
      1. Atlanta
      2. Chicago
      3. Denver
      4. Los Angeles
      5. New York
      6. Philadelphia
  8. How the ACS Works
  9. Your Answers, Your Future
    1. Measuring America
  10. News
    1. New Census Bureau Infographic Shows How Communities Rely on the ACS
    2. Census Bureau Releases New Median Earnings by Detailed Occupations
      1. Table Packages
    3. 17 Percent Have Said ‘I Do’ More Than Once, Census Bureau Reports
      1. 17 Percent Have Said ‘I Do’ More Than Once, Census Bureau Reports
      2. Remarriage in the United States
        1. Introduction
          1. Figure 1 American Community Survey Questions on Marital History
        2. How Many Men and Women Had Married More Than Once?
          1. Table 1 Marital History for People 15 Years Old and Over by Age and Sex: 2008–2012
        3. What Are the Characteristics of Those Who Had Married More Than Once?
          1. Figure 2. Percentage of Men Married Three Times or More by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008–2012
          2. Figure 3. Percentage of Women Married Three Times or More by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008–2012
          3. Table 2. Characteristics of People 15 Years Old and Over by Times Married: 2008–2012
        4. Has the Portion of Adults Who Remarry Increased Over Time?
          1. Table 3. Marital History by Sex for Selected Birth Cohorts, 1940 to 1944 Through 1975 to 1979: 2008–2012 1
        5. How Many Marriages Include One or Both Spouses Who Had Previously Married?
          1. Table 4. Number of Times Married for Currently Married Wives and Their Husbands: 2008–2012 1
        6. How Does the Percentage of Adults Who Had Married two or More Times Vary Geography?
          1. Figure 4. Percentage of Ever–Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by State: 2008–2012
          2. Table 5. Selected Metropolitan Statistical Areas With Among the Highest and Lowest Percentages of Ever-Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times: 2008–2012 1
          3. Figure 5. Percentage of Ever–Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–2012
        7. Summary and Conclusions
        8. Source of the Data
        9. Accuracy of the Estimates
        10. More Information
        11. Suggested Citation
        12. Contacts
        13. Appendix
          1. Appendix Table A. Margins of Error1 for Table 1 Estimates—Marital History for People 15 Years Old and Over by Age and Sex: 2008–2012
          2. Appendix Table B. Margins of Error1 for Table 2 Estimates—Characteristics of People 15 Years Old and Over by Times Married: 2008–2012
          3. Appendix Table C. Margins of Error1 for Table 3 Estimates—Marital History by Sex for Selected Birth Cohorts, 1940 to 1944 Through 1975 to 1979: 2008–20122
          4. Appendix Table D. Margins of Error1 for Table 4 Estimates—Number of Times Married for Currently Married Wives and Their Husbands: 2008–20122
          5. Appendix Table E. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by State: 2008–2012 1
          6. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          7. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          8. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          9. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          10. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          11. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          12. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          13. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
        14. Footnotes
          1. 1
          2. 2
          3. 3
          4. 4
          5. 5
          6. 6
          7. 7
          8. 8
          9. 9
          10. 10
          11. 11
          12. 12
          13. 13
          14. 14
          15. 15
          16. 16
          17. 17
          18. 18
          19. 19
          20. 20
          21. 21
          22. 22
          23. 23
          24. 24
          25. 25
          26. 26
          27. 27
          28. 28
          29. 29
          30. 30
          31. 31
          32. 32
          33. 33
          34. 34
          35. 35
          36. 36
          37. 37
          38. 38
          39. 39
    4. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Receipt for Households
      1. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households: 2000-2013
        1. Introduction
        2. SNAP Receipt: 2012-2013
          1. Figure 1 Percentage of Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits for the United States and Puerto Rico: 2013
        3. SNAP Receipt: 2000-2013
        4. SNAP Receipt in Metropolitan Areas
          1. Table 1 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt in the Past 12 Months for Households by State and Puerto Rico: 2012 and 2013
          2. Figure 2 Percentage of Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits: 2000−2013
        5. Source and Accuracy
          1. Table 2 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households by State: 2000–2013
          2. Table 3 Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits in the Past 12 Months for Top 25 Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 2012 and 2013
        6. What Is The American Community Survey?
        7. Appendix Table 1 Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits in the Past 12 Months by State: 2000–2013
  11. 2013 Subject Definitions
    1. General Information
    2. Living Quarters
      1. Housing Unit
      2. Group Quarters
    3. Housing Variables
      1. Acreage (Cuerda)
      2. Agricultural Sales
      3. Bedrooms
      4. Business on Property
      5. Computer and Internet Use
      6. Condominium Status and Fee
      7. Contract Rent
      8. Food Stamp/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits (SNAP)
      9. Gross Rent
      10. Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income
      11. Homeowner Vacancy Rate
      12. House Heating Fuel
      13. Household Size
      14. Housing Units
      15. Insurance for Fire, Hazard, and Flood
      16. Internet Use
      17. Kitchen Facilities
      18. Meals Included in Rent
      19. Mobile Home Costs
      20. Monthly Housing Costs
      21. Monthly Housing Costs as a Percentage of Household Income
      22. Mortgage Payment
      23. Mortgage Status
      24. Occupants Per Room
      25. Occupied Housing Units
      26. Owner-Occupied Units
      27. Plumbing Facilities
      28. Population in Occupied Housing Units
      29. Poverty Status of Households
      30. Real Estate Taxes
      31. Rent Asked
      32. Rental Vacancy Rate
      33. Renter-Occupied Housing Units
      34. Rooms
      35. Second or Junior Mortgage Payments or Home Equity Loan
      36. Selected Conditions
      37. Selected Monthly Owner Costs
      38. Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income
      39. Specified Owner-Occupied Units
      40. Specified Renter-Occupied Units
      41. Telephone Service Available
      42. Tenure
      43. Units in Structure
      44. Utilities
      45. Vacancy Status
      46. Vacant – Current Residence Elsewhere
      47. Vacant Housing Units
      48. Value
      49. Vehicles Available
      50. Year Householder Moved into Unit
      51. Year Structure Built
    4. Population Variables
      1. Ability to Speak English
      2. Age
      3. Ancestry
      4. Children Ever Born
      5. Citizenship Status (U.S. Citizenship Status)
      6. Class of Worker
      7. Disability Status
      8. Educational Attainment
      9. Employment Status
      10. Families
      11. Fertility
      12. Field of Degree
      13. Foreign-Born Population
      14. Foster Children
      15. Grade in Which Enrolled
      16. Grandparents as Caregivers
      17. Group Quarters (GQ)
      18. Health Insurance Coverage
      19. Hispanic or Latino Origin
      20. Household
      21. Household Type and Relationship
      22. Household Size
      23. Householder
      24. Immigrants
      25. Income in the Past 12 Months
      26. Industry
      27. Journey to Work
      28. Labor Force Status
      29. Language Spoken at Home
      30. Marital Status/Marital History
      31. Means of Transportation to Work
      32. Migration
      33. Native Population
      34. Nativity
      35. Nativity of Parent
      36. Occupation
      37. Own Children
      38. Period of Military Service
      39. Persons in Family
      40. Persons in Household
      41. Place of Birth
      42. Place of Work
      43. Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months
      44. Private Vehicle Occupancy
      45. Race
      46. Reference Week
      47. Relatives and Nonrelatives
      48. Residence 1 Year Ago
      49. School Enrollment and Type of School
      50. Sex
      51. Social Security Income
      52. Subfamily
      53. Time Leaving Home to Go to Work
      54. Travel Time to Work
      55. Type of School
      56. Usual Hours Worked in the Past 12 Months
      57. Veteran Status
      58. Weeks Worked in the Past 12 Months
      59. Work Experience
      60. Work Status in the Past 12 Months
      61. Year of Entry
    5. Derived Measures
      1. Aggregate
      2. Average
      3. Gini Index
      4. Interpolation
      5. Mean
      6. Median
      7. Percentage
      8. Quartile
      9. Quintile
      10. Rate
      11. Ratio
    6. Quality Measures
      1. General Information
      2. Sample Size
      3. Coverage Rates
      4. Response Rates
      5. Imputation Rates
    7. Appendix A
      1. Field of Degree Classification
      2. Four Main Group Classifications and Thirty-Nine Subgroup Classifications of Languages Spoken at Home with Illustrative Examples
      3. Poverty Factors
      4. Poverty Thresholds
      5. Race Combinations
      6. Median Standard Distributions

  1. Story
  2. Slides
    1. Slide 1 Data Science for the American Community Survey
    2. Slide 2 American Community Survey: Home Page
    3. Slide 3 American Community Survey: Data
    4. Slide 4 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 1
    5. Slide 5 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 2
    6. Slide 6 ACS Data Tables on American FactFinder
    7. Slide 7 American FactFinder: Social Characteristics in the United States
    8. Slide 8 Spreadsheet: ACS DP02
    9. Slide 9 CensusACS-Spotfire: ACS DP02
    10. Slide 10 Industry and Occupation: Table Packages
    11. Slide 11 CensusACS-Spotfire: Table Packages
    12. Slide 12 In Summary…
    13. Slide 13 American Community Survey (ACS)
    14. Slide 14 ACS Information Guide
    15. Slide 15 How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community
    16. Slide 16 Measuring America: Your Answers-Your Future
    17. Slide 17 ACS Data Science Knowledge Base
    18. Slide 18 Data Science for American Community Survey
    19. Slide 19 Spreadsheet: Knowledge Base
    20. Slide 20 CensusACS-Spotfire: Cover Page
    21. Slide 21 ACS Data Science Data Publication
    22. Slide 22 Additional Goal and Overall Purpose
    23. Slide 23 Census Data
    24. Slide 24 Data Visualization Gallery
    25. Slide 25 Spreadsheet: Gallery Index
    26. Slide 26 Where do college graduates work?
    27. Slide 27 stem_data_table
    28. Slide 28 CensusACS-Spotfire: Visualization Gallery Index
    29. Slide 29 CensusACS-Spotfire: Where do college graduates work?
    30. Slide 30 Conclusions and Recommendations
  3. Spotfire Dashboard
  4. Research Notes
    1. Introduction to the American Community Survey
    2. DataFerrett
    3. RFP Excerpts
    4. Short Bio
    5. Principal Accomplishments for Census Bureau/Department of Commerce
    6. Data Science for the American Community Survey
      1. Top Topics
      2. Top Banner
      3. Bottom Banner
        1. About Us
        2. Find Data
        3. Business & Industry
        4. People & Households
        5. Special Topics
        6. Newsroom
    7. Next
  5. American Community Survey
    1. About the Survey
    2. Respond to the Survey
    3. News & Updates
    4. Data
    5. Guidance for Data Users
    6. Geography & ACS
    7. Technical Documentation
    8. Methodology
    9. Library
    10. Operations and Administration
    11. Contact Us
  6. View All Data
    1. New Data Every Year!
    2. Tables & Tools
    3. Other Data Options
      1. Summary File Data
        1. Data Folder
        2. Documentation Folder
          1. Geography Folder
          2. 5-Year Geo Folder
          3. Tech Docs Folder
          4. User Tools Folder
        3. Templates
        4. DVD Set
      2. API (Application Programming Interface)
        1. About this Section
          1. Related Information
      3. PUMS Data
        1. Introduction
        2. Confidentiality of PUMS
        3. Why Use PUMS?
        4. What's Available and How Can I Access PUMS?
        5. Need Help with PUMS?
        6. Geographic Areas Available
      4. Archived Data via FTP
      5. Custom Tables
      6. Restricted-Use Microdata
  7. ACS Information Guide
    1. A Message From the Director
    2. Introduction
    3. Short History of the ACS
    4. Importance of Participating in the ACS
    5. Who Uses the ACS and Why?
      1. Federal Agencies
      2. State and Local Agencies
      3. Nongovernmental organizations
      4. Emergency Planners
      5. American Indians and Alaska Natives
      6. Businesses
      7. Educators
      8. Journalists
      9. Public
    6. How the ACS Works for Your Community
      1. How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community
        1. Collection
        2. Processing and Dissemination
        3. Data-Driven Decisions
        4. United States Census Bureau
    7. ACS Subjects and Data Products
      1. Key ACS Data Products
        1. Data profiles
        2. Comparison Profiles
        3. Selected population profiles
        4. Ranking tables
        5. Detailed tables
        6. Geographic comparison tables
        7. Summary files
        8. Public Use Microdata Sample files
      2. Population
      3. Housing
    8. How ACS Data Are Collected
      1. Overview
      2. Address Selection
      3. Address Contacted by Mail
      4. Telephone Follow-Up for Surveys Not Completed
      5. Personal Visit Follow-Up for Surveys Not Completed or Addresses With Post Office Box Mail Delivery
      6. Personal Visit for People Living in Group Housing
      7. Telephone Follow-Up for Forms Returned Incomplete
    9. The U.S. Constitution, Title 13, and the ACS
    10. The U.S. Census Bureau Oath of Nondisclosure
    11. The Essential Role of the ACS
    12. The ACS Compass Products: Handbooks
      1. General Users
      2. Business
      3. Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS)
      4. State and Local Governments
      5. Media
    13. The ACS Compass Products: Online Tutorial
    14. The ACS Compass Products: Presentations
    15. Why Does the ACS Ask
      1. About income?
      2. About home value?
      3. When someone leaves home to go to work?
      4. About race?
      5. About disabilities?
      6. About health insurance?
      7. About kitchen facilities, telephone service, running water, and flush toilets?
    16. Frequently Asked Respondent Questions
      1. Do I have to respond to the ACS?
      2. Someone came to my home to interview me for the ACS. Is this legitimate?
      3. Why was my address selected for the ACS?
      4. What if I don't know the exact answer to an ACS question?
      5. I am concerned about identity theft. How does the Census Bureau protect my ACS information?
      6. Doesn't the government already have the information requested on the ACS?
    17. Find Out More About Your Community Through New Tools for the ACS
      1. QuickFacts
      2. APIs
      3. Easy Stats
      4. American FactFinder
      5. DataFerrett
    18. Four Ways to Find Help With ACS Statistics
      1. Ask Census
      2. Partnership and Data Services
      3. Customer Service
      4. ACS Web site
    19. Contact Information
      1. How do I complete the survey online?
      2. How do I complete the paper form?
      3. Did the Census Bureau call me?
      4. Did the Census Bureau visit me?
    20. U.S. Census Bureau Regional Offices
      1. Atlanta
      2. Chicago
      3. Denver
      4. Los Angeles
      5. New York
      6. Philadelphia
  8. How the ACS Works
  9. Your Answers, Your Future
    1. Measuring America
  10. News
    1. New Census Bureau Infographic Shows How Communities Rely on the ACS
    2. Census Bureau Releases New Median Earnings by Detailed Occupations
      1. Table Packages
    3. 17 Percent Have Said ‘I Do’ More Than Once, Census Bureau Reports
      1. 17 Percent Have Said ‘I Do’ More Than Once, Census Bureau Reports
      2. Remarriage in the United States
        1. Introduction
          1. Figure 1 American Community Survey Questions on Marital History
        2. How Many Men and Women Had Married More Than Once?
          1. Table 1 Marital History for People 15 Years Old and Over by Age and Sex: 2008–2012
        3. What Are the Characteristics of Those Who Had Married More Than Once?
          1. Figure 2. Percentage of Men Married Three Times or More by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008–2012
          2. Figure 3. Percentage of Women Married Three Times or More by Age, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 2008–2012
          3. Table 2. Characteristics of People 15 Years Old and Over by Times Married: 2008–2012
        4. Has the Portion of Adults Who Remarry Increased Over Time?
          1. Table 3. Marital History by Sex for Selected Birth Cohorts, 1940 to 1944 Through 1975 to 1979: 2008–2012 1
        5. How Many Marriages Include One or Both Spouses Who Had Previously Married?
          1. Table 4. Number of Times Married for Currently Married Wives and Their Husbands: 2008–2012 1
        6. How Does the Percentage of Adults Who Had Married two or More Times Vary Geography?
          1. Figure 4. Percentage of Ever–Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by State: 2008–2012
          2. Table 5. Selected Metropolitan Statistical Areas With Among the Highest and Lowest Percentages of Ever-Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times: 2008–2012 1
          3. Figure 5. Percentage of Ever–Married People 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–2012
        7. Summary and Conclusions
        8. Source of the Data
        9. Accuracy of the Estimates
        10. More Information
        11. Suggested Citation
        12. Contacts
        13. Appendix
          1. Appendix Table A. Margins of Error1 for Table 1 Estimates—Marital History for People 15 Years Old and Over by Age and Sex: 2008–2012
          2. Appendix Table B. Margins of Error1 for Table 2 Estimates—Characteristics of People 15 Years Old and Over by Times Married: 2008–2012
          3. Appendix Table C. Margins of Error1 for Table 3 Estimates—Marital History by Sex for Selected Birth Cohorts, 1940 to 1944 Through 1975 to 1979: 2008–20122
          4. Appendix Table D. Margins of Error1 for Table 4 Estimates—Number of Times Married for Currently Married Wives and Their Husbands: 2008–20122
          5. Appendix Table E. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by State: 2008–2012 1
          6. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          7. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          8. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          9. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          10. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          11. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          12. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
          13. Appendix Table F. Percentage of Ever-Married Men and Women 15 Years Old and Over That Had Married Two or More Times by Metropolitan Statistical Area: 2008–20121—Con.
        14. Footnotes
          1. 1
          2. 2
          3. 3
          4. 4
          5. 5
          6. 6
          7. 7
          8. 8
          9. 9
          10. 10
          11. 11
          12. 12
          13. 13
          14. 14
          15. 15
          16. 16
          17. 17
          18. 18
          19. 19
          20. 20
          21. 21
          22. 22
          23. 23
          24. 24
          25. 25
          26. 26
          27. 27
          28. 28
          29. 29
          30. 30
          31. 31
          32. 32
          33. 33
          34. 34
          35. 35
          36. 36
          37. 37
          38. 38
          39. 39
    4. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Receipt for Households
      1. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households: 2000-2013
        1. Introduction
        2. SNAP Receipt: 2012-2013
          1. Figure 1 Percentage of Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits for the United States and Puerto Rico: 2013
        3. SNAP Receipt: 2000-2013
        4. SNAP Receipt in Metropolitan Areas
          1. Table 1 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt in the Past 12 Months for Households by State and Puerto Rico: 2012 and 2013
          2. Figure 2 Percentage of Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits: 2000−2013
        5. Source and Accuracy
          1. Table 2 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households by State: 2000–2013
          2. Table 3 Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits in the Past 12 Months for Top 25 Metropolitan Statistical Areas: 2012 and 2013
        6. What Is The American Community Survey?
        7. Appendix Table 1 Households Receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Benefits in the Past 12 Months by State: 2000–2013
  11. 2013 Subject Definitions
    1. General Information
    2. Living Quarters
      1. Housing Unit
      2. Group Quarters
    3. Housing Variables
      1. Acreage (Cuerda)
      2. Agricultural Sales
      3. Bedrooms
      4. Business on Property
      5. Computer and Internet Use
      6. Condominium Status and Fee
      7. Contract Rent
      8. Food Stamp/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Benefits (SNAP)
      9. Gross Rent
      10. Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income
      11. Homeowner Vacancy Rate
      12. House Heating Fuel
      13. Household Size
      14. Housing Units
      15. Insurance for Fire, Hazard, and Flood
      16. Internet Use
      17. Kitchen Facilities
      18. Meals Included in Rent
      19. Mobile Home Costs
      20. Monthly Housing Costs
      21. Monthly Housing Costs as a Percentage of Household Income
      22. Mortgage Payment
      23. Mortgage Status
      24. Occupants Per Room
      25. Occupied Housing Units
      26. Owner-Occupied Units
      27. Plumbing Facilities
      28. Population in Occupied Housing Units
      29. Poverty Status of Households
      30. Real Estate Taxes
      31. Rent Asked
      32. Rental Vacancy Rate
      33. Renter-Occupied Housing Units
      34. Rooms
      35. Second or Junior Mortgage Payments or Home Equity Loan
      36. Selected Conditions
      37. Selected Monthly Owner Costs
      38. Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income
      39. Specified Owner-Occupied Units
      40. Specified Renter-Occupied Units
      41. Telephone Service Available
      42. Tenure
      43. Units in Structure
      44. Utilities
      45. Vacancy Status
      46. Vacant – Current Residence Elsewhere
      47. Vacant Housing Units
      48. Value
      49. Vehicles Available
      50. Year Householder Moved into Unit
      51. Year Structure Built
    4. Population Variables
      1. Ability to Speak English
      2. Age
      3. Ancestry
      4. Children Ever Born
      5. Citizenship Status (U.S. Citizenship Status)
      6. Class of Worker
      7. Disability Status
      8. Educational Attainment
      9. Employment Status
      10. Families
      11. Fertility
      12. Field of Degree
      13. Foreign-Born Population
      14. Foster Children
      15. Grade in Which Enrolled
      16. Grandparents as Caregivers
      17. Group Quarters (GQ)
      18. Health Insurance Coverage
      19. Hispanic or Latino Origin
      20. Household
      21. Household Type and Relationship
      22. Household Size
      23. Householder
      24. Immigrants
      25. Income in the Past 12 Months
      26. Industry
      27. Journey to Work
      28. Labor Force Status
      29. Language Spoken at Home
      30. Marital Status/Marital History
      31. Means of Transportation to Work
      32. Migration
      33. Native Population
      34. Nativity
      35. Nativity of Parent
      36. Occupation
      37. Own Children
      38. Period of Military Service
      39. Persons in Family
      40. Persons in Household
      41. Place of Birth
      42. Place of Work
      43. Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months
      44. Private Vehicle Occupancy
      45. Race
      46. Reference Week
      47. Relatives and Nonrelatives
      48. Residence 1 Year Ago
      49. School Enrollment and Type of School
      50. Sex
      51. Social Security Income
      52. Subfamily
      53. Time Leaving Home to Go to Work
      54. Travel Time to Work
      55. Type of School
      56. Usual Hours Worked in the Past 12 Months
      57. Veteran Status
      58. Weeks Worked in the Past 12 Months
      59. Work Experience
      60. Work Status in the Past 12 Months
      61. Year of Entry
    5. Derived Measures
      1. Aggregate
      2. Average
      3. Gini Index
      4. Interpolation
      5. Mean
      6. Median
      7. Percentage
      8. Quartile
      9. Quintile
      10. Rate
      11. Ratio
    6. Quality Measures
      1. General Information
      2. Sample Size
      3. Coverage Rates
      4. Response Rates
      5. Imputation Rates
    7. Appendix A
      1. Field of Degree Classification
      2. Four Main Group Classifications and Thirty-Nine Subgroup Classifications of Languages Spoken at Home with Illustrative Examples
      3. Poverty Factors
      4. Poverty Thresholds
      5. Race Combinations
      6. Median Standard Distributions

Story

December 2, 2015, Census Briefing: Slides and JoinMe (no sound): https://www.cubbyusercontent.com/pl/...49ae038d703032

Data Science for American Community Survey

The American Community Survey (My Note: This Link goes to About the Survey) helps local officials, community leaders and businesses understand the changes taking place in their communities.  It is the premier source for detailed information about the American people and workforce.

The American Community Survey Home Page has 11 Topics and 63 Subtopics to choose from! There may be more. I am going to take a direct path to the data and then see what else I need to use. So I click on the link: View All Data

The View All Data goes to a page with the following six choices:

My Note: The above sidebar list and the contents of the View All Data page are not the same which causes some confusion.

I explored each to determine the best for a data scientist / data journalist:

  • Data Tables & Tools
    • American FactFinder (AFF) is by far the most popular of our data dissemination tools. FactFinder houses almost all of the ACS data tables (sometimes referred to as "data products") produced by the American Community Survey.
  • Archived Data via FTP
    • Files on the FTP server are intended for advanced users. For easy-to-use online data from the American Community Survey, visit the American FactFinder website.
  • Summary File Data
  • PUMS Data
    • Why Use PUMS?
      • PUMS files are perfect for people, such as students, who are looking for greater accessibility to inexpensive data for research projects. Social scientists often use the PUMS for regression analysis and modeling applications.
  • Race/Ethnicity & AIAN Data
    • Census Bureau has released 2 new ACS products. This is the first time this level of statistical detail has been available for groups since the Census 2000.

      • 2006-2010 ACS 5-Year Selected Population Tables and 2006-2010 ACS 5-Year American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) Tables

  • Custom Tables
    • If an ACS data need cannot be met with the data sources tables or PUMS data, users can request a custom tabulation. 
      • My Note: You must reimburse the Census Bureau for all costs of custom tabulations. With a minimum cost of $3,000, each tabulation is priced individually based on the complexity of the request.
  • Restricted-Use Microdata (Not in the side bar contents)
    • Qualified researchers with approved projects can work under strictly controlled secure Census Bureau facilities administered by the Center for Economic Studies. 
      • My Note: Not This Now

In summary, my experience in taking a direct path to the data, was less than satisfying, so I decided to go back to basics and start with the About (which has three items, Publications: ACS Information Guide (PDF Report), How the ACS Works (PNG InfoGraphic) and Textual Equivalent), and Your Answers-Your Future (PNG InfoGraphic and Extract from PDF for Textual Equivalent), and recent products (News, Events, and Library). These appear to respond to Congressional and Public Requests for ACS information.

In the broader context, the entire Census Web Site has three indices: Top Topics (5), Top Banner (6 Topics and 48 Subtopics, and Bottom Banner (6 Topics and 59 Subtopics), but not a Site Map. The American Community Survey is in the Bottom Banner under the topic: People & Households. One has to look for it!

I started at the About the American Community Survey and repurposed the following:

and four recent News articles with ACS data sets.

I looked for the answers to the four critical data science questions and found the following:

I want to make the above repurposed content into a Data Science Data Publication. When I am finished, it will be a Data Science Data Publication Commons that is FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). The results were:

So the goal now is to find the actual data for the last two repurposed documents.

A goal could also be Master Index of the Alls:

The overall purpose is to show a new integrated interface for ACS that is like The DataWeb & DataFerret, that I call a Data Browser using Spotfire.

The method and results are provide below:

Conclusions and Recommendations:

  • The American Community Survey helps local officials, community leaders and businesses understand the changes taking place in their communities.  It is the premier source for detailed information about the American people and workforce.
  • My experience in taking a direct path to the ACS data, was less than satisfying, so I decided to go back to basics and data mine a cross-section of Census Data Sources.
  • The Census Data Visualization Gallery was is easiest to mine where 31 of 42 have data sets can be easily scraped into Excel and imported into Spotfire. Please See My Recent Census Data Visualizations Webinar for More Examples.
  • The overall purpose is to show a new integrated interface for ACS and CensusData Sources that is like The DataWeb & DataFerret, that I call a Data Browser using Spotfire.
  • A Data Scientist / Data Journalist can select ACS and other Census Data (Table Packages, Visualizations, etc.) and produce custom data products and stories for less than the $3000 minimum charge for Custom Data Tables!

MORE TO FOLLOW

My Note: I thought the Knowledge Base should contain definitions with well-defined URLs, so I found the 2013 ACS Subject Definitions PDF file, converted to Word and copied it to MindTouch worked very well. I also tried PDF-Excel to see if the tables were captured to Excel and they were. I can also copy these MindTouch tables to Excel.

Slides

Slides

Slide 1 Data Science for the American Community Survey

Semantic Community

Data Science

Data Science for American Community Survey

BrandNiemann10052015Slide1.PNG

Slide 2 American Community Survey: Home Page

http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/

BrandNiemann10052015Slide2.PNG

Slide 3 American Community Survey: Data

http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data.html

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Slide 4 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 1

BrandNiemann10052015Slide4.PNG

Slide 5 Exploratory Data Analysis for ACS 2

BrandNiemann10052015Slide5.PNG

Slide 6 ACS Data Tables on American FactFinder

http://www.census.gov/acs/www/data/d...an-factfinder/

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Slide 7 American FactFinder: Social Characteristics in the United States

http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/t...prodType=table

BrandNiemann10052015Slide7.PNG

Slide 8 Spreadsheet: ACS DP02

CensusACS.xlsx

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Slide 9 CensusACS-Spotfire: ACS DP02

BrandNiemann10052015Slide9.PNG

Slide 10 Industry and Occupation: Table Packages

http://www.census.gov/people/io/publ..._packages.html

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Slide 11 CensusACS-Spotfire: Table Packages

BrandNiemann10052015Slide11.png

Slide 12 In Summary…

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Slide 13 American Community Survey (ACS)

http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/about.html

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Slide 15 How the American Community Survey Works for Your Community

http://www.census.gov/programs-surve...acs-works.html

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Slide 16 Measuring America: Your Answers-Your Future

http://www.census.gov/library/infogr...ur-future.html

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Slide 18 Data Science for American Community Survey

Data Science for American Community Survey

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Slide 19 Spreadsheet: Knowledge Base

CensusACS.xlsx

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Slide 20 CensusACS-Spotfire: Cover Page

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Slide 21 ACS Data Science Data Publication

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Slide 22 Additional Goal and Overall Purpose

BrandNiemann10052015Slide22.PNG

Slide 23 Census Data

http://www.census.gov/data.html

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Slide 24 Data Visualization Gallery

http://www.census.gov/dataviz/

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Slide 25 Spreadsheet: Gallery Index

CensusACS.xlsx

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Slide 26 Where do college graduates work?

http://www.census.gov/dataviz/visual...tem/stem-html/

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Slide 27 stem_data_table

View Data Table [XLS]

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Slide 28 CensusACS-Spotfire: Visualization Gallery Index

http://www.census.gov/dataviz/

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Slide 29 CensusACS-Spotfire: Where do college graduates work?

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Slide 30 Conclusions and Recommendations

Webinar

BrandNiemann10052015Slide30.PNG

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

Research Notes

Introduction to the American Community Survey

Description: Discover the detailed social, economic, and housing statistics that the American Community Survey (ACS) provides for every community every year. You will learn about basics of the yearly estimates and datasets produced from the ACS, resources available on our website (http://census.gov/acs), and how to access ACS data products through a variety of tools with emphasis on American FactFinder.

Date: August 25, 2015

Time: 2pm-3pm ET

Level: Introductory

DataFerrett

February 2013

TheDataWeb & DataFerrett

Presentation: TheDataWeb & DataFerrett [PDF] Exercises: ACS 5-Year Summary File [PDF]  |  ACS Public Use Microdata Sample [PDF]  |  Current Population Survey [PDF]

RFP Excerpts

The purpose of this activity is to continue transition of current ACS systems to a new hosting environment. ACS plans to start this transition in June of 2015 and finish by March of 2016.

The services for this Work Order will be acquired using the following technical requirement areas:

  • Processes, Tools and Methods Improvements for Documentation and Testing Interfaces (T&M)
  • Test Material and Data (FFP)
  • Migration of current ACS systems to a new hardware platform (T&M)
  • SAS Programming and technical support for custom tabulations (T&M)

The majority of shall be performed at the U.S. Census Bureau (USCB) located at 4600 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, MD 20746. On occasion, if approved in advance by the Contracting Officer Representative (COR), work may be performed off-site at an alternate work location.

The Census Bureau anticipates a notional level of effort of 10-13 FTEs.

The Census Bureau requires the contractor to assist the government with the development of an integrated solution for field data collection applications. The requirements of this WO are organized into the following primary areas:

  • Knowledge Transfer/Information Sharing
  • Business, Data and Application Architecture
  • System Engineering and Integration Support
  • Transition

The Census Bureau anticipates a notional level of effort of 40-48 FTEs.

Data and Application Architecture System Engineering 

Sent e-mail: RickRogers@Westat.com

Short Bio

Brand Niemann, former Senior Enterprise Architect & Data Scientist with the US EPA, works as a data scientist, produces data science products, and publishes data stories for Semantic Community, AOL Government, & Data Science & Data Visualization DC. He founded and co-organizes the Federal Big Data Working Group Meetup.

Dr. Brand Niemann
Director and Senior Data Scientist/Data Journalist
Semantic Community
http://semanticommunity.info
http://www.meetup.com/Federal-Big-Data-Working-Group/

Principal Accomplishments for Census Bureau/Department of Commerce

Gore Hammer Award for Fedstats.gov and Fedstats.net

http://semanticommunity.info/FedStats.gov

http://semanticommunity.info/FedStats.net

Data Journalist About Census Bureau for AOL.gov:

http://semanticommunity.info/AOL_Gov...ming_and_going

More stories upon request

Department of Commerce App Challenge:

http://semanticommunity.info/AOL_Gov..._App_Challenge

Semantic Data Science Team Presentation to Census Big Data Lead (Cavan Capps) on Census Semantic Knowledge Base with Cray Graph Computer:

http://semanticommunity.info/Census_...Knowledge_Base

Census Data Visualization:

http://semanticommunity.info/Census_..._Visualization

Webinar: https://immixgroup.adobeconnect.com/...&pbMode=normal

Data Science for the American Community Survey

In process: see outline below

http://www.census.gov/en.html

Top Topics

Site Map: No

Index A-Z: Yes
http://www.census.gov/main/www/a2z

Top Banner

Topics: Population, Economy
http://www.census.gov/topics.html

Geography: Maps, Geographic Data
http://www.census.gov/geography.html

Library: Infographics, Publications
http://www.census.gov/library.html

Data: Tools, Developers
http://www.census.gov/data.html

About the Bureau: Research, Surveys
http://www.census.gov/about.html

Newsroom: News, Events, Blogs
http://www.census.gov/newsroom.html

Bottom Banner

Note these could be copied to MindTouch to preserve the links.

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Are You in a Survey?
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Find Data

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Newsroom

News Releases
Release Schedule
Facts for Features
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Pick: American Community Survey
http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs.html
Build an Index and Data Science Data Publication

Next

My Note: Should I do a Master Index of Alls

Did All Data (?): http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/data.html

All Library: http://www.census.gov/programs-surve...brary.All.html

All News: http://www.census.gov/programs-surve...eases.All.html

Data Releases: http://www.census.gov/programs-surve...-releases.html

ACS New and Notable: http://www.census.gov/programs-surve...4/release.html

http://www.census.gov/programs-surve...mentation.html

Technical Document

Core technical document contains information about how to use the ACS Summary File
   2013 Core Tech Doc [1.0 MB]
 
 

June 9, 2015

The ACS website has been refreshed and reorganized! Below you will find links to the new versions of some of our most popular pages

The Value of the American Community Survey: Smart Government, Competitive Businesses, and Informed Citizens

May 6, 2015

The Economics and Statistics Administration (ESA) at the Department of Commerce has released a new report titled   The Value of the American Community Survey: Smart Government, Competitive Businesses, and Informed Citizens.

In a blog post about the release, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs Mark Doms writes:

"Better data for better decisions. That's our mantra at ESA. And one of the best sources of data in an increasingly data-driven decision-making world is the American Community Survey.

Today, we released a new report titled The Value of the American Community Survey: Smart Government, Competitive Businesses, and Informed Citizens, which explores one of the Federal Government's most valuable statistical products.  The American Community Survey produces a wealth of data our country uses for a wide range of purposes, including helping direct the investment of over $400 billion in federal funding each year.  Community leaders use our data to analyze the evolving needs of their neighborhoods, to plan for the future, and to locate new schools, hospitals, police and fire departments.  And businesses rely on our data to make key marketing, site selection, and workforce decisions, to better serve customers and create jobs. 

The value of the ACS lies in its ability to provide comprehensive information for every community in America, no matter how small.  No other source of data offers what the ACS can: fresh, annual data on the country's changing demographics and socioeconomics.  Today's report shows us just how much the ACS makes our governments smarter, our businesses more competitive, and our people more informed."

 

American Community Survey 3-Year Discontinued

March 02, 2015

The U.S. Census Bureau has proposed discontinuing the ACS 3-year estimates. If approved, the Census Bureau would not release the 2012-2014 ACS 3-year estimates, and the 3-year Public Use Microdata Sample files.

The Census Bureau will continue producing data for all communities, regardless of size, via the 5-year statistical product, the flagship dataset for the ACS program. We will also continue producing 1-year estimates for communities of 65,000.

More information is posted in 2014 Data Release.

 

2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates Now Available

December 04, 2014

Get the latest statistics from the ACS!

American Community Survey's annual data release provides statistics on a variety of population and housing topics for the nation, states, and your community.

2009-2013 ACS 5-Year Estimates on American FactFinder

Go to 2013 Data Release to learn more.

American Community Survey

http://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs.html

The American Community Survey (My Note: This Link goes to About the Survey Below) helps local officials, community leaders and businesses understand the changes taking place in their communities.  It is the premier source for detailed information about the American people and workforce.

My Note: This Page has 11 Topics and 63 Subtopics to Choose From! There May Be More. I am Going to Take a Direct Path to the Data and Then See What Else I Need to Use. View All Data

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