Table of contents
  1. Spotfire Dashboard
  2. The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
    1. EADRCC’s main tasks
    2. A multinational team of experts
    3. Support for national authorities in civil emergencies
    4. Historical background
    5. Emergency Contact officer
  3. Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC)
    1. Snow storms in Albania
    2. Snow storms in Montenegro
    3. Georgia to host NATO/EAPC disaster response exercise
    4. Earthquake in Turkey
    5. More stories
    6. Content
    7. Opinions
    8. Documents
    9. Multimedia
    10. Links
  4. Operations
    1. Snow storms in Montenegro
    2. Earthquake in Turkey
    3. Floods in Pakistan
    4. Floods in Albania
    5. Floods in Pakistan
    6. Floods in Montenegro
    7. Forest fires in Israel
    8. Floods in Ukraine
    9. Floods in Moldova
    10. Kyrgyz Republic requests assistance to NATO Civil Emergency Planning
    11. Floods in Hungary
    12. Floods in Poland
    13. Multiple natural disasters in Tajikistan
    14. Floods in Albania
    15. Previous operations
      1. H1N1 - Pandemic flu in Bulgaria - November 2009
      2. H1N1 - Pandemic flu in Ukraine - October 2009
      3. Earthquake in Georgia - September 2009
      4. Floods and mudflows in Tajikistan - May 2009
      5. Sharing information on swine influenza measures - April 2009
      6. Assistance to Kyrgyzstan following earthquake - October 2008
      7. Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria - September 2008
      8. Helping Ukraine cope with flooding - August 2008
      9. Helping Moldova cope with flooding - August 2008
      10. Helping Albania after massive explosions in an ammunition storage site - March 2008
      11. Helping Albania fight the forest fires - August 2007
      12. Helping Bosnia and Herzegovina fight the forest fires - July 2007
      13. Helping the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia1 fight the forest fires - July 2007
      14. Helping Albania fight the forest fires - July 2007
      15. Helping Bulgaria fight the forest fires - July 2007
      16. Helping Bulgaria cope with floods - April 2006
      17. Helping Slovakia cope with floods - April 2006
      18. Coping with heavy snowfall in southern Kyrgyzstan - March 2006
      19. Support to Algeria in dealing with floods - February 2006
      20. Pakistan earthquake relief operation - October 2005
      21. Support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina - September 2005
      22. Helping the Kyrgyz Republic cope with floods - June 2005
      23. Flood assistance to Bulgaria - June 2005
      24. Flood assistance to Romania - May 2005
      25. Fighting floods in Georgia - April 2005
      26. Forest Fires in Portugal - August 2003
      27. Floods in Azerbaijan - (.PDF/9Kb) - May 2003
      28. Possible emergency situation in Turkey - March 2003
      29. Fighting floods in Albania - Sept.-Oct. 2002
      30. Fighting floods in the Czech Republic - Aug. 2002 1. Turkey recognises the Republic of Macedonia with its constitutional name.
  5. News
    1. 28 Feb. 2012
      1. Slovenia and Greece aid snow-covered Montenegro
    2. 30 Sep. 2010
      1. More NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan’s flood victims
    3. 20 Sep. 2010
      1. NATO continues to airlift relief goods to help Pakistan’s flood victims
    4. 11 Sep. 2010 - 17 Sep. 2010
      1. Armenia hosts NATO’s annual disaster response exercise
    5. 02 Sep. 2010
      1. One more NATO humanitarian relief flight lands in Islamabad
    6. 01 Sep. 2010
      1. NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan continue
    7. 27 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft deliver relief goods to Pakistan
    8. 22 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft departs with relief goods to Islamabad
    9. 20 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft to deliver humanitarian relief goods to Pakistan
    10. 31 Oct. 2009
      1. NATO helps Ukraine prepare for H1N1 flu pandemic
    11. 05 Sep. 2009 - 10 Sep. 2009
      1. Kazakhstan hosts NATO disaster response exercise
    12. 04 Jun. 2009 - 05 Jun. 2009
      1. Developments in NATO’s Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee
    13. 29 Apr. 2009
      1. NATO and Partners share CBRN defence know-how
    14. 27 Apr. 2009 - 29 Apr. 2009
      1. NATO sponsors disaster assistance training in Croatia
    15. 06 Sep. 2008
      1. Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria
    16. 31 Jul. 2008
      1. Helping Moldova and Ukraine cope with flooding
    17. 01 Jun. 2008
      1. Exercise “UUSIMAA 2008”
    18. 01 Jun. 2008
      1. NATO disaster response exercise kicks off in Finland
    19. 28 May. 2008
      1. Tenth anniversary of the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
    20. 22 May. 2008
      1. NATO Food and Agriculture Planning Committee meets with Mediterranean Dialogue countries
    21. 20 Jul. 2007
      1. Forest fire requests for assistance
    22. 18 Jun. 2007
      1. Technisches Hilfswerk (THW) Exhibition at NATO HQ
    23. 19 May. 2007 - 24 May. 2007
      1. NATO prepares for civil emergency exercise in Croatia
    24. 04 Sep. 2005
      1. Statement by the NATO spokesman on support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina
    25. 04 Sep. 2005
      1. Statement by the NATO spokesman on further support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina
    26. 03 Jun. 1998
      1. NATO Secretary General to inaugurate the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) at 1700 on 3Rd June 1998
  6. The NATO Core Geographic Services System
    1. Preface
      1. Figure 1
    2. The Challenge
      1. Figure 2
    3. The Solution
      1. Figure 3
    4. The Results
    5. Contact Information
    6. Copyright © 2011 ESRI
  7. DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap
    1. 1 Introduction
      1. Figure 1 – DGIWG Roadmap Conceptual Model
    2. 2 Mission and Objectives - Policies and Guidelines
    3. 3 User Requirements
      1. 3.1 Customers Organisations
      2. 3.2  High level User Requirements, Portrayal capabilities
    4. 4 Current State–Geospatial Information Portrayal within the Defence Community
    5. 5 Relevant Standards & Technologies
      1. 5.1 ISO/TC 211
      2. 5.2 Open Geospatial Consortium
      3. 5.3 Graphic Standards
      4. 5.4  Display Technology
    6. 6 Liaison Partners and Customers
      1. 6.1 International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC 211)
      2. 6.2 Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
      3. 6.3 International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)
      4. 6.4 Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP)
      5. 6.5 NATO Interservice Geospatial Working Group (IGeoWG)
      6. 6.6 NATO Core GIS
      7. 6.7 NATO Geospatial Maritime WG (GMWG)
      8. 6.8 Geospatial Intelligence Standards Working Group (GWG)
      9. 6.9 ICAO - International Civil Aviation Organisation  
    7. 7 Future State
      1. 7.1 The Future of Geospatial Portrayal in DGIWG
        1. Figure 2 – Portrayal System Components
        2. Figure 3 - DGIWG Portrayal Register Organisation
    8. 8 Activity Plan
      1. 8.1 Current Projects
        1. DGIWG Project D06 - Information Model for Portrayal of Geospatial Information and Schema for DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        2. DGIWG Project D22 - Implementation of a Prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        3. DGIWG Project S01 - Portrayal Service
          1. Figure 4 – DGIWG Projects and Dependencies
        4. DGIWG Project D14 - Symbols for Mission Specific Data
        5. DGIWG Project D15 - Symbols for Hardcopy Output of Mission Specific Data
      2. 8.2 Future Projects & Activities
        1. Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        2. Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Service
        3. International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO)
        4. New symbology requirements
        5. Harmonization Projects
    9. Annex A– OGC Specifications
      1. A.1   Symbology Encoding
      2. A.2   Web Feature Service
      3. A.3   Web Map Service
      4. A.4   Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the Web Map Service
    10. Annex B– StandardSymbol Sets
      1. NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 3675, Symbols for Land Maps, Aeronautical Charts, and Special Naval Charts for Joint Operations at Scale 1:250,000
      2. MIL-STD-2402, Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Symbols for Graphic Products
      3. DGIWG Portrayal Standard for Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP) Data
      4. MIL-DTL-89045A, Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display (GeoSym) ®
      5. MIL-STD-2525C, Common Warfighting Symbology
      6. NATO Allied Publication APP-6A, Military Symbols for Land Systems
      7. American National Standards Institute (ANSI-INCITS 415-2006) American National Standard for Information Technology - Homeland Security Mapping Standard – Point Symbology for Emergency Management
      8. World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Weather Symbols
      9. INT-1, Symbols, Abbreviations, and Terms Used on Charts
      10. Special Publication S-52, Colour and Symbol Specification for ECDIS
      11. Special Publication S-100, Geospatial Standard for Hydrographic Data
      12. Air Standards Coordinating Committee (ASCC) Advisory Publication 90/03, Flight Information Publications (FLIP) Navigation Displays – Symbology
    11. Annex C– Terms, definitions and abbreviations
  8. NEXT

NATO Disaster Response

Last modified
Table of contents
  1. Spotfire Dashboard
  2. The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
    1. EADRCC’s main tasks
    2. A multinational team of experts
    3. Support for national authorities in civil emergencies
    4. Historical background
    5. Emergency Contact officer
  3. Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC)
    1. Snow storms in Albania
    2. Snow storms in Montenegro
    3. Georgia to host NATO/EAPC disaster response exercise
    4. Earthquake in Turkey
    5. More stories
    6. Content
    7. Opinions
    8. Documents
    9. Multimedia
    10. Links
  4. Operations
    1. Snow storms in Montenegro
    2. Earthquake in Turkey
    3. Floods in Pakistan
    4. Floods in Albania
    5. Floods in Pakistan
    6. Floods in Montenegro
    7. Forest fires in Israel
    8. Floods in Ukraine
    9. Floods in Moldova
    10. Kyrgyz Republic requests assistance to NATO Civil Emergency Planning
    11. Floods in Hungary
    12. Floods in Poland
    13. Multiple natural disasters in Tajikistan
    14. Floods in Albania
    15. Previous operations
      1. H1N1 - Pandemic flu in Bulgaria - November 2009
      2. H1N1 - Pandemic flu in Ukraine - October 2009
      3. Earthquake in Georgia - September 2009
      4. Floods and mudflows in Tajikistan - May 2009
      5. Sharing information on swine influenza measures - April 2009
      6. Assistance to Kyrgyzstan following earthquake - October 2008
      7. Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria - September 2008
      8. Helping Ukraine cope with flooding - August 2008
      9. Helping Moldova cope with flooding - August 2008
      10. Helping Albania after massive explosions in an ammunition storage site - March 2008
      11. Helping Albania fight the forest fires - August 2007
      12. Helping Bosnia and Herzegovina fight the forest fires - July 2007
      13. Helping the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia1 fight the forest fires - July 2007
      14. Helping Albania fight the forest fires - July 2007
      15. Helping Bulgaria fight the forest fires - July 2007
      16. Helping Bulgaria cope with floods - April 2006
      17. Helping Slovakia cope with floods - April 2006
      18. Coping with heavy snowfall in southern Kyrgyzstan - March 2006
      19. Support to Algeria in dealing with floods - February 2006
      20. Pakistan earthquake relief operation - October 2005
      21. Support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina - September 2005
      22. Helping the Kyrgyz Republic cope with floods - June 2005
      23. Flood assistance to Bulgaria - June 2005
      24. Flood assistance to Romania - May 2005
      25. Fighting floods in Georgia - April 2005
      26. Forest Fires in Portugal - August 2003
      27. Floods in Azerbaijan - (.PDF/9Kb) - May 2003
      28. Possible emergency situation in Turkey - March 2003
      29. Fighting floods in Albania - Sept.-Oct. 2002
      30. Fighting floods in the Czech Republic - Aug. 2002 1. Turkey recognises the Republic of Macedonia with its constitutional name.
  5. News
    1. 28 Feb. 2012
      1. Slovenia and Greece aid snow-covered Montenegro
    2. 30 Sep. 2010
      1. More NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan’s flood victims
    3. 20 Sep. 2010
      1. NATO continues to airlift relief goods to help Pakistan’s flood victims
    4. 11 Sep. 2010 - 17 Sep. 2010
      1. Armenia hosts NATO’s annual disaster response exercise
    5. 02 Sep. 2010
      1. One more NATO humanitarian relief flight lands in Islamabad
    6. 01 Sep. 2010
      1. NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan continue
    7. 27 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft deliver relief goods to Pakistan
    8. 22 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft departs with relief goods to Islamabad
    9. 20 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft to deliver humanitarian relief goods to Pakistan
    10. 31 Oct. 2009
      1. NATO helps Ukraine prepare for H1N1 flu pandemic
    11. 05 Sep. 2009 - 10 Sep. 2009
      1. Kazakhstan hosts NATO disaster response exercise
    12. 04 Jun. 2009 - 05 Jun. 2009
      1. Developments in NATO’s Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee
    13. 29 Apr. 2009
      1. NATO and Partners share CBRN defence know-how
    14. 27 Apr. 2009 - 29 Apr. 2009
      1. NATO sponsors disaster assistance training in Croatia
    15. 06 Sep. 2008
      1. Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria
    16. 31 Jul. 2008
      1. Helping Moldova and Ukraine cope with flooding
    17. 01 Jun. 2008
      1. Exercise “UUSIMAA 2008”
    18. 01 Jun. 2008
      1. NATO disaster response exercise kicks off in Finland
    19. 28 May. 2008
      1. Tenth anniversary of the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
    20. 22 May. 2008
      1. NATO Food and Agriculture Planning Committee meets with Mediterranean Dialogue countries
    21. 20 Jul. 2007
      1. Forest fire requests for assistance
    22. 18 Jun. 2007
      1. Technisches Hilfswerk (THW) Exhibition at NATO HQ
    23. 19 May. 2007 - 24 May. 2007
      1. NATO prepares for civil emergency exercise in Croatia
    24. 04 Sep. 2005
      1. Statement by the NATO spokesman on support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina
    25. 04 Sep. 2005
      1. Statement by the NATO spokesman on further support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina
    26. 03 Jun. 1998
      1. NATO Secretary General to inaugurate the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) at 1700 on 3Rd June 1998
  6. The NATO Core Geographic Services System
    1. Preface
      1. Figure 1
    2. The Challenge
      1. Figure 2
    3. The Solution
      1. Figure 3
    4. The Results
    5. Contact Information
    6. Copyright © 2011 ESRI
  7. DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap
    1. 1 Introduction
      1. Figure 1 – DGIWG Roadmap Conceptual Model
    2. 2 Mission and Objectives - Policies and Guidelines
    3. 3 User Requirements
      1. 3.1 Customers Organisations
      2. 3.2  High level User Requirements, Portrayal capabilities
    4. 4 Current State–Geospatial Information Portrayal within the Defence Community
    5. 5 Relevant Standards & Technologies
      1. 5.1 ISO/TC 211
      2. 5.2 Open Geospatial Consortium
      3. 5.3 Graphic Standards
      4. 5.4  Display Technology
    6. 6 Liaison Partners and Customers
      1. 6.1 International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC 211)
      2. 6.2 Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
      3. 6.3 International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)
      4. 6.4 Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP)
      5. 6.5 NATO Interservice Geospatial Working Group (IGeoWG)
      6. 6.6 NATO Core GIS
      7. 6.7 NATO Geospatial Maritime WG (GMWG)
      8. 6.8 Geospatial Intelligence Standards Working Group (GWG)
      9. 6.9 ICAO - International Civil Aviation Organisation  
    7. 7 Future State
      1. 7.1 The Future of Geospatial Portrayal in DGIWG
        1. Figure 2 – Portrayal System Components
        2. Figure 3 - DGIWG Portrayal Register Organisation
    8. 8 Activity Plan
      1. 8.1 Current Projects
        1. DGIWG Project D06 - Information Model for Portrayal of Geospatial Information and Schema for DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        2. DGIWG Project D22 - Implementation of a Prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        3. DGIWG Project S01 - Portrayal Service
          1. Figure 4 – DGIWG Projects and Dependencies
        4. DGIWG Project D14 - Symbols for Mission Specific Data
        5. DGIWG Project D15 - Symbols for Hardcopy Output of Mission Specific Data
      2. 8.2 Future Projects & Activities
        1. Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        2. Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Service
        3. International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO)
        4. New symbology requirements
        5. Harmonization Projects
    9. Annex A– OGC Specifications
      1. A.1   Symbology Encoding
      2. A.2   Web Feature Service
      3. A.3   Web Map Service
      4. A.4   Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the Web Map Service
    10. Annex B– StandardSymbol Sets
      1. NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 3675, Symbols for Land Maps, Aeronautical Charts, and Special Naval Charts for Joint Operations at Scale 1:250,000
      2. MIL-STD-2402, Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Symbols for Graphic Products
      3. DGIWG Portrayal Standard for Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP) Data
      4. MIL-DTL-89045A, Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display (GeoSym) ®
      5. MIL-STD-2525C, Common Warfighting Symbology
      6. NATO Allied Publication APP-6A, Military Symbols for Land Systems
      7. American National Standards Institute (ANSI-INCITS 415-2006) American National Standard for Information Technology - Homeland Security Mapping Standard – Point Symbology for Emergency Management
      8. World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Weather Symbols
      9. INT-1, Symbols, Abbreviations, and Terms Used on Charts
      10. Special Publication S-52, Colour and Symbol Specification for ECDIS
      11. Special Publication S-100, Geospatial Standard for Hydrographic Data
      12. Air Standards Coordinating Committee (ASCC) Advisory Publication 90/03, Flight Information Publications (FLIP) Navigation Displays – Symbology
    11. Annex C– Terms, definitions and abbreviations
  8. NEXT

Note: OGC (36) and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (5) references. Slides. World Disaster Knowledgebase. NCOIC WorkSlides

  1. Spotfire Dashboard
  2. The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
    1. EADRCC’s main tasks
    2. A multinational team of experts
    3. Support for national authorities in civil emergencies
    4. Historical background
    5. Emergency Contact officer
  3. Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC)
    1. Snow storms in Albania
    2. Snow storms in Montenegro
    3. Georgia to host NATO/EAPC disaster response exercise
    4. Earthquake in Turkey
    5. More stories
    6. Content
    7. Opinions
    8. Documents
    9. Multimedia
    10. Links
  4. Operations
    1. Snow storms in Montenegro
    2. Earthquake in Turkey
    3. Floods in Pakistan
    4. Floods in Albania
    5. Floods in Pakistan
    6. Floods in Montenegro
    7. Forest fires in Israel
    8. Floods in Ukraine
    9. Floods in Moldova
    10. Kyrgyz Republic requests assistance to NATO Civil Emergency Planning
    11. Floods in Hungary
    12. Floods in Poland
    13. Multiple natural disasters in Tajikistan
    14. Floods in Albania
    15. Previous operations
      1. H1N1 - Pandemic flu in Bulgaria - November 2009
      2. H1N1 - Pandemic flu in Ukraine - October 2009
      3. Earthquake in Georgia - September 2009
      4. Floods and mudflows in Tajikistan - May 2009
      5. Sharing information on swine influenza measures - April 2009
      6. Assistance to Kyrgyzstan following earthquake - October 2008
      7. Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria - September 2008
      8. Helping Ukraine cope with flooding - August 2008
      9. Helping Moldova cope with flooding - August 2008
      10. Helping Albania after massive explosions in an ammunition storage site - March 2008
      11. Helping Albania fight the forest fires - August 2007
      12. Helping Bosnia and Herzegovina fight the forest fires - July 2007
      13. Helping the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia1 fight the forest fires - July 2007
      14. Helping Albania fight the forest fires - July 2007
      15. Helping Bulgaria fight the forest fires - July 2007
      16. Helping Bulgaria cope with floods - April 2006
      17. Helping Slovakia cope with floods - April 2006
      18. Coping with heavy snowfall in southern Kyrgyzstan - March 2006
      19. Support to Algeria in dealing with floods - February 2006
      20. Pakistan earthquake relief operation - October 2005
      21. Support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina - September 2005
      22. Helping the Kyrgyz Republic cope with floods - June 2005
      23. Flood assistance to Bulgaria - June 2005
      24. Flood assistance to Romania - May 2005
      25. Fighting floods in Georgia - April 2005
      26. Forest Fires in Portugal - August 2003
      27. Floods in Azerbaijan - (.PDF/9Kb) - May 2003
      28. Possible emergency situation in Turkey - March 2003
      29. Fighting floods in Albania - Sept.-Oct. 2002
      30. Fighting floods in the Czech Republic - Aug. 2002 1. Turkey recognises the Republic of Macedonia with its constitutional name.
  5. News
    1. 28 Feb. 2012
      1. Slovenia and Greece aid snow-covered Montenegro
    2. 30 Sep. 2010
      1. More NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan’s flood victims
    3. 20 Sep. 2010
      1. NATO continues to airlift relief goods to help Pakistan’s flood victims
    4. 11 Sep. 2010 - 17 Sep. 2010
      1. Armenia hosts NATO’s annual disaster response exercise
    5. 02 Sep. 2010
      1. One more NATO humanitarian relief flight lands in Islamabad
    6. 01 Sep. 2010
      1. NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan continue
    7. 27 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft deliver relief goods to Pakistan
    8. 22 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft departs with relief goods to Islamabad
    9. 20 Aug. 2010
      1. NATO aircraft to deliver humanitarian relief goods to Pakistan
    10. 31 Oct. 2009
      1. NATO helps Ukraine prepare for H1N1 flu pandemic
    11. 05 Sep. 2009 - 10 Sep. 2009
      1. Kazakhstan hosts NATO disaster response exercise
    12. 04 Jun. 2009 - 05 Jun. 2009
      1. Developments in NATO’s Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee
    13. 29 Apr. 2009
      1. NATO and Partners share CBRN defence know-how
    14. 27 Apr. 2009 - 29 Apr. 2009
      1. NATO sponsors disaster assistance training in Croatia
    15. 06 Sep. 2008
      1. Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria
    16. 31 Jul. 2008
      1. Helping Moldova and Ukraine cope with flooding
    17. 01 Jun. 2008
      1. Exercise “UUSIMAA 2008”
    18. 01 Jun. 2008
      1. NATO disaster response exercise kicks off in Finland
    19. 28 May. 2008
      1. Tenth anniversary of the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
    20. 22 May. 2008
      1. NATO Food and Agriculture Planning Committee meets with Mediterranean Dialogue countries
    21. 20 Jul. 2007
      1. Forest fire requests for assistance
    22. 18 Jun. 2007
      1. Technisches Hilfswerk (THW) Exhibition at NATO HQ
    23. 19 May. 2007 - 24 May. 2007
      1. NATO prepares for civil emergency exercise in Croatia
    24. 04 Sep. 2005
      1. Statement by the NATO spokesman on support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina
    25. 04 Sep. 2005
      1. Statement by the NATO spokesman on further support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina
    26. 03 Jun. 1998
      1. NATO Secretary General to inaugurate the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) at 1700 on 3Rd June 1998
  6. The NATO Core Geographic Services System
    1. Preface
      1. Figure 1
    2. The Challenge
      1. Figure 2
    3. The Solution
      1. Figure 3
    4. The Results
    5. Contact Information
    6. Copyright © 2011 ESRI
  7. DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap
    1. 1 Introduction
      1. Figure 1 – DGIWG Roadmap Conceptual Model
    2. 2 Mission and Objectives - Policies and Guidelines
    3. 3 User Requirements
      1. 3.1 Customers Organisations
      2. 3.2  High level User Requirements, Portrayal capabilities
    4. 4 Current State–Geospatial Information Portrayal within the Defence Community
    5. 5 Relevant Standards & Technologies
      1. 5.1 ISO/TC 211
      2. 5.2 Open Geospatial Consortium
      3. 5.3 Graphic Standards
      4. 5.4  Display Technology
    6. 6 Liaison Partners and Customers
      1. 6.1 International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC 211)
      2. 6.2 Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)
      3. 6.3 International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)
      4. 6.4 Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP)
      5. 6.5 NATO Interservice Geospatial Working Group (IGeoWG)
      6. 6.6 NATO Core GIS
      7. 6.7 NATO Geospatial Maritime WG (GMWG)
      8. 6.8 Geospatial Intelligence Standards Working Group (GWG)
      9. 6.9 ICAO - International Civil Aviation Organisation  
    7. 7 Future State
      1. 7.1 The Future of Geospatial Portrayal in DGIWG
        1. Figure 2 – Portrayal System Components
        2. Figure 3 - DGIWG Portrayal Register Organisation
    8. 8 Activity Plan
      1. 8.1 Current Projects
        1. DGIWG Project D06 - Information Model for Portrayal of Geospatial Information and Schema for DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        2. DGIWG Project D22 - Implementation of a Prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        3. DGIWG Project S01 - Portrayal Service
          1. Figure 4 – DGIWG Projects and Dependencies
        4. DGIWG Project D14 - Symbols for Mission Specific Data
        5. DGIWG Project D15 - Symbols for Hardcopy Output of Mission Specific Data
      2. 8.2 Future Projects & Activities
        1. Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Registry
        2. Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Service
        3. International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO)
        4. New symbology requirements
        5. Harmonization Projects
    9. Annex A– OGC Specifications
      1. A.1   Symbology Encoding
      2. A.2   Web Feature Service
      3. A.3   Web Map Service
      4. A.4   Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the Web Map Service
    10. Annex B– StandardSymbol Sets
      1. NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 3675, Symbols for Land Maps, Aeronautical Charts, and Special Naval Charts for Joint Operations at Scale 1:250,000
      2. MIL-STD-2402, Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Symbols for Graphic Products
      3. DGIWG Portrayal Standard for Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP) Data
      4. MIL-DTL-89045A, Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display (GeoSym) ®
      5. MIL-STD-2525C, Common Warfighting Symbology
      6. NATO Allied Publication APP-6A, Military Symbols for Land Systems
      7. American National Standards Institute (ANSI-INCITS 415-2006) American National Standard for Information Technology - Homeland Security Mapping Standard – Point Symbology for Emergency Management
      8. World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Weather Symbols
      9. INT-1, Symbols, Abbreviations, and Terms Used on Charts
      10. Special Publication S-52, Colour and Symbol Specification for ECDIS
      11. Special Publication S-100, Geospatial Standard for Hydrographic Data
      12. Air Standards Coordinating Committee (ASCC) Advisory Publication 90/03, Flight Information Publications (FLIP) Navigation Displays – Symbology
    11. Annex C– Terms, definitions and abbreviations
  8. NEXT

Spotfire Dashboard

For Internet Explorer Users and Those Wanting Full Screen Display Use: Web Player Get Spotfire for iPad App

The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre

Source: http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/topics_52057.htm?

National and international teams performing urban rescue

The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) is a “24/7” focal point for coordinating disaster relief efforts among NATO member and partner countries.

EADRCC’s main tasks

The EADRCC’s main function is to coordinate the response of NATO and partner countries to natural or man-made disasters within the Euro-Atlantic area. The Centre has guided consequence management efforts in more than fourty-five emergencies, including fighting floods and forest fires and dealing with the aftermath of earthquakes.

Operations have included support to the US in response to Hurricane Katrina and - following  requests from the Government of Pakistan - assistance in coping with the aftermath of the devastating October 2005 earthquake and the massive July 2010 floods. Since 11 September 2001, the EADRCC has also been tasked with dealing with the consequences of CBRN incidents, including terrorist attacks. Most recently, the countries of the Mediterranean Dialogue (MD) and the Istambul Cooperation Initiative (ICI) were given direct access to the Centre.

The Centre also functions as an information-sharing tool for NATO and partner countries on disaster assistance. It organises seminars to discuss lessons learned from NATO-coordinated disaster response operations and exercises. In addition, it holds an annual large-scale field exercise with a realistic scenario for effective interaction. Recent exercises have included scenarios such as a terrorist attack using chemical agents.

All these tasks are performed in close cooperation with the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN-OCHA), which retains the primary role in the coordination of international disaster relief operations. The EADRCC is designed as a regional coordination mechanism, supporting and complementing the United Nations in its efforts. Furthermore, the EADRCC’s primary function is coordination rather than direction. In the case of a disaster requiring international assistance, it is up to individual NATO and partner nations to decide whether to provide assistance, based on information received from the EADRCC.

A multinational team of experts

The Centre is part of the International Staff’s Operations Division located at NATO’s Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium and is staffed by up to five secondees from NATO and partner countries and three members of NATO’s International Staff. The Centre liaises closely with UN OCHA, the NATO Military Authorities (NMAs) and other relevant International Organizations (IOs). During an actual disaster, the EADRCC can temporarily be augmented with additional personnel from EAPC delegations to NATO, or NATO’s international civilian and military staffs. In addition, the EADRCC has access to national civil experts that can be called up to provide the Centre with particular advice in different areas in the event of a major disaster.

Support for national authorities in civil emergencies

The EADRCC forwards the request to NATO and partner countries, which respond by communicating their offers of assistance to the EADRCC and/or the stricken country.

The Centre uses AIDMATRIX to keep a record of the assistance offered (including through other international organisations and actors), assistance accepted by the stricken country, delivery dates, assistance still required (or updates to the assistance requested), as well as the situation on the ground.

This information is circulated to NATO and partner countries in the form of daily situation reports and published on the NATO Web site.

In 2005, following a decision by the North Atlantic Council, NATO's principal decision-making body, the EADRCC was also used, on an exceptional basis, to coordinate the donations of NATO and partner countries to the relief effort in Pakistan. This followed a formal request from the Government of Pakistan, and the subsequent decision by the North Atlantic Council.

Regular major disaster exercises have been organised in different participating countries designed to practice procedures, provide training for local and international participants, build up interoperability skills and capabilities of the non-standing Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Unit (EADRU), and harness the experience and lessons learned for future operations.

Historical background

The Centre was created in 1998 by the Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council (EAPC) as one of the two basic elements of the EAPC policy on “Enhanced Practical Cooperation in the Field of International Disaster Relief”. The other element is the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Unit (EADRU) - a non-standing, multi-national force of civil and military elements, which can be deployed in the event of a major natural or man-made disaster in an EAPC country.

Following the events of September 11, 2001, in the US, the EADRCC was tasked to coordinate international assistance from EAPC countries to help deal with the consequences of CBRN incidents, including terrorist attacks.

Emergency Contact officer

Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre
NATO Headquarters
Building V, Office V 119
Boulevard Leopold III
Brussels 1110, Belgium

Phone: +32 2 707 2670      
Fax: +32 2 707 2677
E-mail: eadrcc@hq.nato.int

Emergency Contact Officer (24h/24):
Duty Officer EADRCC: +32 475 829 071

 

Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC)

Last Updated: 13-Feb-2012

Source: http://www.nato.int/eadrcc/

The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) is a “24/7” focal point for coordinating disaster relief efforts among NATO member and partner countries.


More about this Topic...

Ru. Ukr.

News

Snow storms in Albania

During the last few days Albania has been hit by persistent low temperatures and massive snowfalls. On 16 February 2012, the NATO Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) received a request for assistance from Albania.

More...

Snow storms in Montenegro

On 13 February 2012, the NATO Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) received a request for assistance from Montenegro.

More...

Georgia to host NATO/EAPC disaster response exercise

On 25 – 26 January the initial planning conference in preparation for the consequence management field exercise GEORGIA 2012 was held at the NATO Headquarters, Brussels. The event was hosted by the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) in cooperation with the Georgian Ministry of Internal Affairs' (MoIA) Emergency Management Department (EMD).

More...

Earthquake in Turkey

On 10 November 2011, NATO received a second disaster assistance request from Turkey.

More...


  1. Turkey recognises the Republic of Macedonia with its constitutional name.

Opinions

Documents

Multimedia

 

Operations

Source: http://www.nato.int/eadrcc/operations-e.htm Note: Some of the Links below do not work and have been corrected in the Operations Knowledgebase Subpage to this Page

Snow storms in Montenegro

 

13 Feb 2012 - On 13 February 2012, the NATO Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) received a request for assistance from Montenegro.

Earthquake in Turkey

 

26 Oct 2011 - On 26 October 2011, NATO received a disaster assistance request from Turkey. A powerful 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck eastern Turkey on Sunday (23 October 2011).

Floods in Pakistan

 

16 Sept 2011 - On 14 September 2011, NATO received a request for assistance from Pakistan. On 15 September, the North Atlantic Council (NAC) authorized activation of the EADRCC.

Floods in Albania

 

1 Dec 2010 - On 1 December 2010, the EADRCC received a request for assistance from Albania. Due to continuous rainfall for over a week, water levels in the lakes and on the Drini River have risen. As a result, the Shkodra region has been flooded.

Floods in Pakistan

 

7 Aug 2010 - On 7 August 2010, NATO has received a request for assistance from Pakistan. The permission for the EADRCC to deal with this situation was approved by the North Atlantic Council on 5 August.

Floods in Montenegro

 

3 Dec 2010 - On 3 December 2010, the EADRCC received a request for assistance from Montenegro. Due to continuous rainfall since mid-November 2010, water levels in the lakes and on the rivers have been rising. As a result 12 Montenegrin municipalities (out of 21) have been continuously flooded.

Forest fires in Israel

 

3 Dec 2010 - On 3 December 2010, the EADRCC received a request for assistance from Israel. A forest fire started in the afternoon (2/12) in the Carmel Mountain and spread in its surrounding, causing tremendous damage and loss of life.

Floods in Ukraine

 

27 July 2010 - During the period of 22-29 of June 2010 as a result of strong rainfalls and winds the emergency situation in Chernivtsy region (borders with Romania and Moldova) occurred. On 26 July 2010, the EADRCC received a disaster assistance request from the Mission of Ukraine to NATO.

Floods in Moldova

 

6 July 2010 - On 6 July 2010, the EADRCC received a request for urgent disaster assistance from Moldova. Defensive alert is being maintained on the length of 1352 km of the Republic of Moldova main rivers – Nistru and Prut.

Kyrgyz Republic requests assistance to NATO Civil Emergency Planning

 

9 April 2010 - Because of the situation in Kyrgyz Republic, the interim government of the Kyrgyz Republic has requested NATO Civil Emergency Planning (CEP) to distribute requirements of medicines and medical equipment for use in emergencies.

Floods in Hungary

 

6 June 2010 -On 6 June 2010, the EADRCC received a request for assistance from Hungary. The Danube river is flooding on its whole Hungarian length and other floods occur in the Borsod-Abauj-Zemplen county in Northern Hungary.

Floods in Poland

 

25 May 2010 - Due to heavy rainfalls on 18 May 2010 Southern and Central voivodships (regions) of Poland were flooded. As rescue capacities became overwhelmed, the Polish authorities sent a disaster assisitance request to EADRCC.

Multiple natural disasters in Tajikistan

 

19 May 2010 - Due to a number of natural disasters in Tajikistan, including an earthquake in the Gorno-Badakhshan region on 2 January 2010 and continuous heavy rainfalls from 25 March to 12 May, multiple damages were reported to citizens and economy including flooding, mudflows and landslides in 21 districts.

Floods in Albania

 

7 January 2010 - On 7 January 2010, the EADRCC received a request for assistance from Albania. Due to continuous rainfall during November and December 2009, water levels in the lakes and on the Drini River rose. As a result, the Shkodra and Lezha regions were flooded.

Previous operations

Earthquake in Georgia September 2009

Forest Fires in Portugal - August 2003

Floods in Azerbaijan - (.PDF/9Kb) - May 2003

Fighting floods in Albania - Sept.-Oct. 2002

Fighting floods in the Czech Republic - Aug. 2002

1. Turkey recognises the Republic of Macedonia with its constitutional name.

News

Source: http://www.nato.int/cps/en/SID-54AB6B27-F1F4AEFB/natolive/news.htm?keywordquery=EADRCC%20(Euro-Atlantic%20Disaster%20Response%20Coordination%20Centre)&search=true

Date sort in ascending ordersort in descending order   Title sort in ascending ordersort in descending order

28 Feb. 2012

Slovenia and Greece aid snow-covered Montenegro

Following heavy snowfall, Montenegro declared a state of emergency throughout the country early this week and made a call for assistance from the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre. The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) is NATO's focal point for coordination of assistance provided by Allies and Partners in cases of civil emergency.

30 Sep. 2010

More NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan’s flood victims

A B 747 transport aircraft arrived in Pakistan yesterday, 30 September, with around 110 tons of high energy biscuits donated by the World Food Programme (WFP). The goods were transported from Izmir, Turkey, to Islamabad airport. Also yesterday, a Trainer Cargo Aircraft from the NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force (AWACS) arrived in Islamabad with around five tons of food, clothing and medical supplies donated by an NGO.

20 Sep. 2010

NATO continues to airlift relief goods to help Pakistan’s flood victims

A Trainer Cargo Aircraft from the NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force (AWACS) arrived in Islamabad this week with around 17 tons of relief goods. In addition to water purification systems, including one donated by NATO, the aircraft also carrried tents, beds and blankets donated by the German government.

11 Sep. 2010 - 17 Sep. 2010

Armenia hosts NATO’s annual disaster response exercise

From 11 to 17 September, NATO is holding its annual disaster response exercise near the Armenian capital of Yerevan, organized by the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC).

02 Sep. 2010

One more NATO humanitarian relief flight lands in Islamabad

A NATO Trainer Cargo Aircraft from the NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force (AWACS) arrived in Islamabad on Thursday, 2 September, with around 12 tons worth of generators, tents, boats, food and clothing donated by a non-governmental organization.

01 Sep. 2010

NATO humanitarian relief flights to Pakistan continue

A NATO Trainer Cargo Aircraft from the NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force (AWACS) arrived in Islamabad this Wednesday, 1 September. It delivered around 13 tons worth of generators, tents, boats, food and clothing donated by a non-governmental organization.

27 Aug. 2010

NATO aircraft deliver relief goods to Pakistan

More relief goods were transported to Islamabad this weekend as part of the NATO overall effort to airlift humanitarian aid to Pakistan.

22 Aug. 2010

NATO aircraft departs with relief goods to Islamabad

A NATO Trainer Cargo Aircraft departed Geilenkirchen airbase in Germany on Sunday 22 August with humanitarian aid to Pakistan. It will deliver relief goods such as water pumps, power generators and tents. The goods were donated by the Republic of Slovakia.<BR>

20 Aug. 2010

NATO aircraft to deliver humanitarian relief goods to Pakistan

In response to a request by the Government of Pakistan, the North Atlantic Council decided today to provide airlift and sealift for the delivery of aid donated by nations and humanitarian relief organizations.

31 Oct. 2009

NATO helps Ukraine prepare for H1N1 flu pandemic

On 31 October 2009, the Ukraine requested assistance from the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC), which then distributed an Urgent Disaster Assistance Request to all EAPC nations, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs and the European Union Monitoring and Information Centre (EU MIC), specifying the requested items and services.

05 Sep. 2009 - 10 Sep. 2009

Kazakhstan hosts NATO disaster response exercise

“On 6 September 2009, a severe earthquake hits the Almaty province in Kazakhstan. Confronted with more than 200 000 people affected, critical infrastructure damage and the threat of chemical contamination, the Government of Kazakhstan requests help from the international community.”

04 Jun. 2009 - 05 Jun. 2009

Developments in NATO’s Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee

The Senior Civil Emergency Planning Committee (SCEPC) Plenary Session in EAPC and Allied format will take place on 4-5 June 2009 at NATO Headquarters. The plenary brings together representatives from Interior Ministries and Emergency Management Agencies to exchange best practices and enhance cooperation.

29 Apr. 2009

NATO and Partners share CBRN defence know-how

As part of Allied overall efforts against proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), NATO will host a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Defence demonstration at Belgium’s Joint CBRN Centre in Jambes, near Namur, Belgium, on 29 April.

27 Apr. 2009 - 29 Apr. 2009

NATO sponsors disaster assistance training in Croatia

A training course co-sponsored by the NATO Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Co-ordination Centre (EADRCC) gathered 17 representatives from 9 NATO and Partner countries in Croatia this month.

06 Sep. 2008

 

Fighting forest fires in Bulgaria

On 6 September 2008, Bulgaria sent to the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) a request for assistance in fighting forest fires.

31 Jul. 2008

Helping Moldova and Ukraine cope with flooding

On 31 July 2008, the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Co-ordination Centre (EADRCC) received an urgent request from the Republic of Moldova and Ukraine to help them cope with major floods.

01 Jun. 2008

 

Exercise “UUSIMAA 2008”

The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) will conduct the disaster response field exercise “UUSIMAA 2008” from 1 to 5 June 2008 in the region of the Finnish capital Helsinki.

01 Jun. 2008

 

NATO disaster response exercise kicks off in Finland

Exercise “UUSIMAA 2008”, a consequence management field exercise organised by the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) started on 1 June 2008 in Finland.

28 May. 2008

 

Tenth anniversary of the Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre

The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre (EADRCC) celebrated its 10th anniversary at NATO Headquarters on 28 May 2008. During the ceremony, the NATO Deputy Secretary General, Ambassador Claudio Bisogniero, inaugurated an exhibition displaying the main achievements of the EADRCC in the last decade.

22 May. 2008

NATO Food and Agriculture Planning Committee meets with Mediterranean Dialogue countries

NATO’s Food and Agriculture Planning Committee (FAPC) will meet on Thursday 22 May at NATO Headquarters to share expertise and experience in the food, agriculture and water sector and ensure it serves NATO's civil and military needs to maximum effect.

20 Jul. 2007

Forest fire requests for assistance

NATO’s Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre has passed on to NATO and Partner countries requests for assistance from Bulgaria, Albania and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia1.

18 Jun. 2007

Technisches Hilfswerk (THW) Exhibition at NATO HQ

The NATO Secretary General, Mr. Jaap de Hoop Scheffer opened the Technisches Hilfswerk Exhibition at NATO headquarters on Monday 18 June.

19 May. 2007 - 24 May. 2007

 

NATO prepares for civil emergency exercise in Croatia

This May, Croatia will host a challenging civil emergency exercise; the fictional scenario will comprise facing a devastating earthquake, further aggravated by chemical leaks in an industrial seaport and the threat of terrorists using biological agents onboard a passenger plane.

04 Sep. 2005

 

Statement by the NATO spokesman on support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina

The United States has requested from NATO relief support in the form of food supplies.

04 Sep. 2005

 

Statement by the NATO spokesman on further support to the US in response to hurricane Katrina

Following up on the earlier request for food supplies, the United States Government has now provided to NATO a longer list of requirements for support. This list includes medical and logistical supplies.

03 Jun. 1998

 
 

The NATO Core Geographic Services System

Enterprise GIS for Defense Provides Strong, Centralized Geospatial Capabilities
 

Preface

Figure 1

ESRINATOFigure1.png
 
Caption: ArcGIS Explorer provides an easy way to access local desktop data sources and online NATO Core GIS web services and analysis capabilities when connected to the NATO LAN.
 
Peacekeeping and security missions take North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces to remote regions of the world, from the rugged mountains in Afghanistan to the choppy seas off the Horn of Africa.
 
NATO personnel who work in these diverse environments, often under dangerous conditions, need fast and easy access to accurate and up-to-date geographic information for planning missions, evaluating terrain, navigating ships and other vessels, analyzing intelligence, and managing logistics. In short, they require maps, imagery, and other geospatial data, along with geographic information system (GIS) technology, to manage, analyze, and visualize data and create web-based GIS services and applications.
 
NATO Consultation, Command, and Control Agency (NC3A) provides a technical solution for these types of geospatial products, services, and software to NATO’s operational commands in Allied Command Operations (ACO), the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan, and other missions through the NATO Core Geographic Services system.

The Challenge

NATO needed a next-generation GIS to provide centralized geospatial capabilities throughout the organization. The abundance of disconnected and barely connected legacy systems for collecting, managing, analyzing, and disseminating geospatial information no longer sufficed. The existing systems could not handle the full volume of incoming data. Built on outdated technology, these systems were often
incompatible with each other, too.
 
NATO required a modern, enterprise-level information technology (IT) infrastructure built on IT standards for handling and working with geospatial information. Recognizing GIS as a fundamental technology, NATO wanted the new geospatial solution to provide
 
• Improved commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and hardware
• Decentralized geospatial data management at each NATO headquarters, with centralized quality control by Allied Command Operations
• Standardized GIS production and dissemination tasks
• An improved interface with NATO Functional Area Services (FAS), which manages logistic and operational information within the common operational picture (COP)

Figure 2

ESRINATOFigure2.png

Caption: The NATO Geo staff creates map products and makes them available via web services for NATO Core GIS users and systems.

The Solution

In 2006, NATO contracted with Siemens Enterprise Communications to implement the NATO Core Geographic Services system (NATO Core GIS), an enterprise-level geospatial data and services infrastructure. Siemens brought project management, communications, security, site rollout, hardware, and many other assets to the project. Esri joined the team to provide all the geospatial capabilities for the solution. Other team members include ESRI Nederland B.V. and Belgium company GIM, brought on for training and technical support, respectively.
 
NATO Core GIS provides centralized geospatial services to NATO headquarters staff and command and control (C2) systems. The system delivers the following:
 
• Cartographic services are available through a high-end GIS desktop and server environment. NATO’s geospatial staff will use desktop and server-based applications to acquire, manage, produce, maintain, and publish all geospatial data, products, and web services.
• Core GIS services, such as web map services and other geospatial capabilities, are centralized in one location at each headquarters and available through a variety of web services. Staff in every NATO headquarters can access these maps and services through the Core Geo Viewer, a simple GIS viewer. Access is also available using ArcGIS® Desktop or other applications that can use Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc.® (OGC ®)-compliant web services.
• NATO FAS project teams now have access to a GIS developer toolkit called the Component-Based Framework (CBF) to build custom GIS viewers and services for specialized user communities such as intelligence, logistics, and land C2.
 
These services and the toolkit are deployed on each of the local area networks (LANs) at 18 NATO headquarters in 12 countries. This means that all NATO staff will have access to the same strategic geospatial information and products, whether they are at ACO or ISAF headquarters in Afghanistan, ensuring that everyone in NATO “fights off the same map.”
 
NATO Core GIS services are available using many OGC and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards, integral to promoting interoperability among NATO systems and member states. Any system that can connect to the NATO network and consume OGC services can use the geospatial information. NATO Core GIS will provide this open framework via OGC web services, such as Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Feature Service (WFS). This enables other systems to ingest and use geospatial data for further analysis, visualization, and planning such as C2 and logistics.
 
NATO also mandated a solution that uses 80 percent or greater commercial off-the-shelf products, guaranteeing all the benefits of mature, stable, maintained software that will continue to be updated as the project develops.

Figure 3

ESRINATOFigure3.png

Caption: The Core Geo Viewer provides access to NATO geospatial assets, readily available via standards-based web services.
 
The Esri® ArcGIS system underpins the solution, which is based on the following products:
 
• ArcGIS Desktop plus several extensions for the high-end cartographic workstations
• ArcGIS Server, with the Spatial, 3D, and Image extensions, which are critical to supporting server-side GIS capabilities within the system
• ArcGIS Workflow Manager to manage all GIS tasks such as map updates and requests for special geospatial analytic products
• ArcGIS Engine and ArcGIS Web Mapping APIs for the developer toolkit
• Core Geo Viewer, a customized 2D web GIS viewer, in addition to Esri’s ArcGIS Explorer, an advanced 2D and 3D GIS viewer
 
NATO Core GIS uses a modern hardware and software infrastructure to support the GIS technology, including
 
• A multiterabyte and centralized storage environment for imagery and other geospatial products
• Oracle 11g as the database technology to store geospatial information such as vector geodata
• Scalable servers capable of supporting a large and distributed user community
 
The server, workstation, and networking hardware components come from Dell. Siemens is responsible for configuration management of the Oracle database and all the hardware. Once accepted by NC3A, NATO CIS Agency (NCSA) will take ownership of the systems and be responsible
for life cycle system maintenance.
 
Training is a key element of any complex system. For NATO Core GIS, ESRI Nederland B.V. is responsible for conducting training at NATO CIS School (NCISS). Training courses have been developed and delivered to GIS specialists, IT staff, and database administrators.

The Results

NATO staff around the world can now access geospatial data throughout NATO’s command structure, add mission-specific overlays and use powerful geoprocessing tools. Commanders, their staff, GIS analysts, and other NATO network users will fuse geospatial content from NATO Core GIS with other forms of information to use in C2, intelligence, logistics, and many other applications. This was a challenging system development project for everyone involved. It stretched the limits of technology, tested the NATO procurement system, and—like any major project—had its ups and downs. However, all agree that the result is a worldleading defense GIS that will save lives on the battlefield,
make NATO planning and operations more efficient, and allow NATO to deliver more geospatial capabilities over the system’s life cycle.

Contact Information

John F. Teufert, NC3A Geo-Officer
Capability Area Team 6, NC3A
Oude Waalsdorperweg 61, 2597 AK, The Hague,
Netherlands
P.O. Box 174, 2501 CD, The Hague, Netherlands
Phone: +31 (0)70-374-3524
Fax: +31 (0)70-374-3049

Copyright © 2011 ESRI

All rights reserved. ESRI, the ESRI globe logo, ArcGIS, and esri.com are trademarks, registered trademarks, or service marks of ESRI in the United States, the European Community, or certain other jurisdictions. Other companies and products mentioned herein may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective trademark owners. G46949 6/11tk
 

DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap

Defence Geospatial Information Working Group Portrayal Roadmap
DGIWG908Logo.png

DGIWG – 908

DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap

Document Identifier: ENT-DP-10-020-ed2.0.0-DGIWG_Portratyal_Roadmap

Publication Date: 02 August 2010

Edition: 2.0.0

Edition Date: 02 August 2010

Responsible Party: DGIWG

Audience: Approved for public release

Abstract: This Roadmap serves as a strategy and planning tool for DGIWG’s portrayal activities. It is a plan of work for the portrayal of geospatial information within the military community of users.

Copyright: (C) Copyright DGIWG, some rights reserved  -  (CC) (By:) Attribution

You are free:

-     to copy, distribute, display, and perform/execute the work

-     to make derivative works

-     to make commercial use of the work

Under the following conditions: 

-     (By:) Attribution. You must give the original author (DGIWG) credit.

-     For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work.

Any of these conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder DGIWG.

Your fair use and other rights are in no way affected by the above.

This is a human-readable summary of the Legal Code (the full license is available from Creative Commons <http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ >).


1 Introduction

This Roadmap serves as a strategy and planning tool for DGIWG’s portrayal activities.  The roadmap has been drafted by the DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap (T03) Project Team.  The DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap document is a plan of work for the portrayal of geospatial information within DGIWG, as approved by the DGIWG Plenary.

The Roadmap will be reviewed annually and updated as necessary.  The project team will review the roadmap for currency prior to technical panel meetings providing updates from the technical panel meetings.  If revisions are required, the draft will be distributed to DGIWG members for comment, approval will be sought from the DGIWG plenary.

The design of the roadmap follows the DGIWG conceptual model as developed by the 2005 DGIWG Plenary.

The roadmap model describes the current state, the projected future state and the activities necessary to reach the goals in the future state.  DGIWG’s mission, objectives, policy and guidelines influence this process. The process is also influenced by user requirements, relevant standards/ technologies and liaison partners.

A description of these elements follows.

Figure 1 – DGIWG Roadmap Conceptual Model

DGIWG908Figure 1 – DGIWG Roadmap Conceptual Model.png

2 Mission and Objectives - Policies and Guidelines

DGIWG is the multi-national body responsible to member nation defence organisations coordinating, advising and providing policy recommendations on geospatial standardization issues.  Coalition interoperability challenges are met by creating standards and procedures required to enable the provision, exchange and use of standardized geospatial information.  The business vision of DGIWG is to significantly increase the levels of geospatial interoperability of all member nations to fulfil new demands for geospatial intelligence in coalition operations.

DGIWG work on geospatial standards includes portrayal of geospatial information. The mission of portrayal activities within DGIWG is to enable appropriate display of geospatial information in the context of a military system.  It is also the strategy to utilize commercial industry standards optimallywhich in turn will influence international and industry standards developments as necessary.

The portrayal of geospatial information is vital to the operational decision making process. Portrayal of geospatial information is the point at which the information held and managed within a Geographic Information System (GIS) is intended to be rendered meaningfully to the user.  The ability of the portrayal to communicate information is dependant on the quality and coherence of the portrayal standard used. 

3 User Requirements

This section identifies DGIWG customers and describes their high level requirementswithin the scope of DGIWGportrayal activities.

3.1 Customers Organisations

The customer group for DGIWG’s portrayal standardization activity comprises the entire DGIWG community consisting of the following organisation:

  • Defence organisations of DGIWG member nations including armed forces and homeland security organisations
  • NATO Interservice Geospatial Working Group (IGEOWP)
  • NATO Core GIS Program
  • Multinational Geospatial Co-production Program (MGCP)
  • International Hydrographical Organisation (IHO) (Liaison)
  • International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) (Liaison)

3.2  High level User Requirements, Portrayal capabilities

Portrayal capabilities are essential for the employment of geospatial information. In a collaborative environment it is crucial that capabilities are standardised as standardisation enables the exchange of information. There is therefore a growing requirement to provide a comprehensive registry of all symbology sets used within a military environment as well as a requirements for a service oriented distribution of the information held in the registry.

In the area of portrayal, standardisation not only implies common encoding and common technological interfaces. Standardisation of information itself in the form of rules and symbols are likewise required in order to bring about a common cartography. Currently many organisations develop and maintain their own symbol sets but do not harmonise them with each other on the information level, i.e. symbols and rules. To ensure true interoperability of portrayal, DGIWG anticipates this future call for harmonisation of symbols and rules from both its member nations and from participating organisations.

The above can be summarized to the following high level requirements for portrayal capabilities.

  • Portrayal information in the form of symbols and portrayal rules must be standardized in accordance to current civil/ commercial standards
  • Portrayal information must be available for use, exchange and maintenance
  • Portrayal information must be accessible through web-services to be used in a web-centric environment as well as in non-networked applications
  • Capabilities should enable geospatial information to be portrayed on digital displays and hardcopy media output
  • Information must be accessible to users via Standards-based Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (SCOTS) applications
  • Portrayal information in the form of symbols and rules must be available for exchange among nations.
  • Portrayal information must be easily maintained and expanded upon as new requirements for geospatial intelligence visualization emerge.

DGIWG is striving to meet these requirements by establishing a DGIWG Portrayal Registry. The DGIWG Portrayal Registry is described the chapter on the future state. Establishing the portrayal registry and making it accessible through a web service is a complex process, which is reflected in a number of DGIWG projects, each addressing elements in the development of a portrayal system. These projects are described in the chapter on the activity plan.

4 Current State–Geospatial Information Portrayal within the Defence Community

The defence environment is in a process of transition.  For many years military organisations have relied on paper maps to conduct military operations.  Paper maps have formed the basis for understanding the topography and environment of the operational area.  Paper maps have also served as the base for operational planning and understanding the operational picture, when Command and Control (C2) symbols have been drawn on maps (for example those in NATO APP-6, Joint Symbology). In recent decades digital geospatial information has replaced paper maps in many military applications.  DGIWG was largely created to standardize this information so it could be exchanged and used by partner nations.  More recent developments with the internet are pushing the defence environment toward a service-oriented architecture, and net-centric warfare, which is characterized by the ability of geographically dispersed forces creating a high level of shared battlespace awareness that can be exploited to achieve the commander’s intent.  The civilian geospatial information industry, exemplified by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), is also emphasizing interoperability though standardized interfaces to web services.  In the current defence environment however, many military users still rely on non-networked systems, and even paper maps, to accomplish many tasks, and nation’s military organisations and even individual units within the same army may be farther along in their transition toward a service-oriented architecture and net-centric operations than others.

Today, there is no comprehensive, centrally managed symbol library available for the portrayal of topographic, hydrographic, aeronautical, operational military, emergency response, and environmental information.  The portrayal of a “common operational picture” or “recognized environmental picture” involves depicting information from multiple domains or communities of interest, including geospatial, military operational, meteorological and oceanographic, and a host of other communities.  Yet, each of these communities already has well-established graphic symbols to portray information to their community. There are a great variety of symbol sets in use today to portray geospatial and geo-located activities and phenomena in relation to the Earth’s surface.

The customer requirement, as expressed by the NATO Core GIS Program, NATO Geospatial Maritime Working Group, and others, is for an integrated symbol set to portray information that is contained in many of these existing symbol standards. Today there is no integrated symbology across domains that are usable for the display of information from these diverse communities of interest. These symbol sets have been developed independently of each other, and in some cases conflict with each other. The draw rules (colours, icon shapes, etc.) for symbols are not consistent. The same visual symbol may mean different things in different communities, and different symbols may mean the same thing.

Symbols are also presented to the user community of interest in many different ways. Most symbol sets have evolved from hardcopy “symbol books”. Most of these are available today in digital document format, such as Portable Document Format (PDF), but these symbol books only provide the basic information about what a symbol means and what it looks like. A few symbology sets, such as the U.S.  National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display (GeoSym®), were designed from the start to be used in a digital environment. There is no overall taxonomy or feature coding methodology that can be used across different domains for different symbol sets.

Many symbol development organisations have maintenance processes that were established to maintain symbol sets in document form. Change proposals for new symbols, or changes to existing symbols can be submitted and approved. However, because symbol sets are still generally maintained as documents, updating the published/promulgated symbol standard is a slow, tedious, and expensive process. Updating documents is dependent on resources and funding. This frequently results in update cycles that are measured in years, rather than months. For example, GeoSym Prototype 4 was evaluated in 2000, was finally published as GeoSym First Edition in 2004. MIL-STD-2525B, Common War fighting Symbology was published in 1998, and Change 1 to that standard was published in 2005.

Since most symbol sets are still promulgated as symbol book documents, after they are published, the symbology must then be implemented in systems, requiring additional time and money before they are available for general use. In most defence systems, symbols are not accessible through a web service or implemented in a portrayal service.  Currently the only existing standardized encoding for symbols is the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Symbology Encoding (SE), but this standard is generally not used in defence systems.  Even Symbology Encoding does not meet all current defence requirements for complex cartographic symbols.

5 Relevant Standards & Technologies

5.1 ISO/TC 211

ISO/TC 211 is a committee established under the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) to develop international standards for geospatial information. Several of these standards are of special interest in the portrayal of geographical information.

ISO 19117, Geographic Information – Portrayal

This standard is part of the 191xx series of standards that are being promulgated by ISO/TC 211. This international standard is an abstract document and is not intended for direct implementation. It gives general guidelines to the application developers about the mechanism that will be used to portray feature instances of a dataset. The portrayal mechanism described in ISO 19117 separates the geospatial data from the portrayal of the data.  This makes it possible to portray the same data in different ways depending on the needs of the user community.  Portrayal rules establish a relationship between a geospatial feature and a particular symbol.  Portrayal rule sets are collections of portrayal rules that in aggregate define a portrayal for each possible feature type defined in the application schema of a geospatial data set.  Different portrayal rule sets can be used to create different portrayals of the same data set. This International Standard includes a mechanism for declaring portrayal attributes as part of the portrayal specification. The standard defines the concepts of portrayal specifications, portrayal catalogues and how they relate to geospatial datasets.

A revision of ISO 19117 is currently underway to improve the structure and content of this standard.  

The rules that define relationships of symbols to other symbols are not defined in ISO 19117.  These product finishing rules (deconfliction, displacement, thinning, etc.,) could be the subject of future work in TC 211 or DGIWG.

ISO 19135, Geographic information – Procedures for item registration

This standardspecifies procedures for the registration of items of geographic information.  ISO/IEC JTC 1 defines registration as the assignment of an unambiguous name to an object in a way that makes the assignment available to interested parties.  Items of geographic information that may be registered are members of object classes specified in technical standards such as those developed by ISO/TC 211.

The standard provides both immediate recognition to extensions of an International Standard and a source for updates to that International Standard during the regular maintenance cycle.  It provides a single mechanism to access information concerning items that are specified in different standards.  It also provides a mechanism for managing temporal change.  Items specified in a standard or in a register may change over time either due to changes in technology or for other reasons.  Published standards do not clearly document what changes may have occurred, and do not include information about earlier versions of specified items.  Such information can be maintained in a register.

5.2 Open Geospatial Consortium

The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is an international industry-orientedconsortium of more than 300 companies, government agencies, research organisations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available interface specifications

OGC’s portrayal activities mainly involve the development of portrayal data exchange formats and service specifications for Web rendering of distributed feature and coverage data. Some basic management aspects of portrayal catalogues are also being considered, but with no emphasis on the organisational and versioning management processes of registration. These activities currently take place in the OGC Web Service (OWS) testing initiatives, in the Decision Support Domain Working Group and in various standards working groups dealing with the development and revision of OGC standards.

Standards and associated documents related to the geospatial portrayal process include Symbol Encoding (SE), which is an XML-based exchange format for portrayal data, Web Feature Service (WFS), offering web access to feature data, and Web Coverage Service (WCS), analogous to WFS but for coverage or gridded/raster data. Several OGC specifications relate to online portrayal of feature data, with different levels of portrayal and remote data access capabilities.  The relevant specifications are Web Map Service (WMS), Styled Layer Descriptor (SLD), and the Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the Web Map Service. The OGC is also developing documents for the management of catalogues and their items. However, the capabilities specified are basic (insert, update, delete operations) and do not consider at all the organisational and versioning management aspects. The relevant documents include the Catalogue Service Implementation Specification and its Application Profiles on which they are based.  OGC has also begun work on a geospatial extension to the OASIS Electronic Business Reference Information Model (ebRIM) and Electronic Business Registry Service (ebRS) standards that provide more powerful versioning capabilities.

See Annex A for further description of OGC specifications relevant to the portrayal of geospatial information.

5.3 Graphic Standards

The portrayal of geographic information is achieved by attaching pre-determined symbols to the feature geometry rendering the data to form a recognisable map. Symbols may be represented either as raster (also known as “bitmaps”) or vector data. 

Among the many graphic encoding standards that are employed many are proprietary and software specific. The majority of raster formats are open and are for general use.  The most common lossy graphics standard is JPEG.  The lossless graphics standards include BMP, GIF, PNG, and XPM.  There are standards that work as lossless or lossy, such as JPEG 2000 and TIFF.  Vector graphics standards include CGM, and SVG.  Some standards combine both raster and vector data for example EPS.

Some of these standards have been adapted specifically for geographic information.  Other geographic graphic formats include ADRG/CADRG, CIB, GeoTIFF (geomatic specialization of TIFF), GeoPDF (geomatic specialization of PDF, a result of NGA's eChart initiative), MrSID, etc.

5.4  Display Technology

The type of display technology employed has an impact on the way rendered geographic information is viewed.  The two major categories of display technology are hardcopy output and digital display. Hardcopy refers to a permanent rendering of digital data on any media suitable for direct use i.e. paper. Digital display refers to the presentation of rendered digital data on a dynamic display. Until recently this has been predominantly by Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) technology. With the availability of new technologies the choice of softcopy display equipment is rapidly increasing.

Each technology offers different advantages and disadvantages. Some of the qualities that differ are size, resolution, ambient light properties, colour gamut, etc. Size can refer to the display area; the display area can vary from the screen of a cell phone to a projection on a wall. Resolution may vary from a fine grained 1600dpi laser printer printout to a 72dpi LCD display.  A display may require a darkened room as with an LCD projector or may require sufficient ambient light as with a paper map. These types of factors influence the portrayal of geospatial data.

6 Liaison Partners and Customers

6.1 International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 211 (ISO/TC 211)

A class “A” liaison has been established between ISO/TC 211 and DGIWG.  In its June 2006 report to ISO/TC 211, the DGIWG expressed its concerns relative to ISO 19117 and sent a call for co-ordination with ISO/TC 211 members. An interest was expressed by a few individual experts, by the convener of Working Group 4 of ISO/TC 211 and OGC. DGIWG experts are leading the project team for revision of ISO 19117.

6.2 Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)

A Memorandum of Understanding establishes the basis of the co-operation between DGIWG and the OGC.  DGIWG participates regularly to OGC meetings, including those related to portrayal. Yet, the cooperation has not really reached the level of a joint effort.  The cooperation between experts of both organisations is usually through DGIWG subject matter expert participation in Open Web Services (OWS) interoperability initiatives.

6.3 International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)

A Memorandum of Understanding establishes the basis of the cooperation between IHO and DGIWG.  Both organisations have been engaged in joint efforts, typically for the establishment of a General Feature Model and of a spatial schema for 2D and 2½D.  Both IHO and DGIWG are moving from their legacy interchange standards (S-57 and DIGEST/VRF, respectively) and associated portrayal standards (S-52 and GeoSym) to the new generation of standards emerging from ISO/TC 211 and OGC.

6.4 Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP)

The Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program(MGCP) aims at collecting and sharing among members a worldwide database of vector data mostly derived from imagery data. The requirements of MGCP are consequently limited to the use of imagery data by the production systems. The MGCP targets the use of commercial imagery sources covering more or less the areas of production and meeting the MGCP resolution requirements. Use of military imagery data nationally may occur but has only a national impact. At this stage, the influence of the civilian standard organisation and the promotion of the international standards are certainly the actions to be considered within the DGIWG Portrayal Roadmap.

Until 2007, the MGCP was primarily concerned with data collection for population of the MGCP Data Warehouse.  Product finishing, including portrayal was considered outside the scope of the MGCP and was a national member task.  Inconsistencies in mapping in support of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) revealed the need for a common portrayal standard for MGCP data, and MGCP asked DGIWG for support in development of this standard.  Since then, DGIWG has worked closely with MGCP members to develop portrayal rules and symbols that can be used to portray MGCP data.  The DGIWG Portrayal Standard for MGCP Data was completed in December 2009.

6.5 NATO Interservice Geospatial Working Group (IGeoWG)

The role of this working group is to progress standardization and/or interoperability in military geospatial matters to order to improve the effectiveness of NATO forces. IGeoWG is in charge of geospatial STANdardization AGreements (STANAGs). IGeoWG is the main point of contact between DGIWG and NATO Core GIS and other NATO initiatives related to geospatial information. The IGeoWG transforms the geospatial requirements from NATO into an unclassified IGeoWG Program of Work.

DGIWG and IGeoWG have established a technical cooperation agreement, around which future cooperation will be built. This is the framework to provide NATO geospatial requirements to DGIWG. Currently IGeoWG and DGIWG are working on DFDD, services and interfaces, and the involvement of civil geospatial standards within NATO. NATO Core GIS is currently one of the main focuses of both organisations.

6.6 NATO Core GIS

NATO Bi-SC (Strategic Commands') AIS (Automated Information Systems) Core Capability Geographic Services project (or Core GIS for short) is aimed at providing NATO’s Strategic and Subordinate Commands with Geographic Services, implemented through the Bi-SC AIS Core Services. NATO Core GIS capability, a primary initiative of NATO NC3A, is an open GIS structure based on spatially enabled Database Management System storing information in geospatial standard formats. DGIWG standards provide the capability for the Core GIS to handle various sources of data, and also for nations to be able to interface with the capability.

NATO has based its design of the Core GIS on open standards from ISO TC211, OGC, DGIWG and the commercial sector in order to provide a high level of interoperability. The geospatial information to be used within the Core GIS is being converted from the source format to a product neutral, standardized structure, using GML, GMLJP2 and DFDD standards. NATO Core GIS also has a portrayal requirement, and has worked with DGIWG to exchange information about the development of portrayal registries and the provision of portrayal information (portrayal rules and symbols) by DGIWG to the NATO Core GIS.

6.7 NATO Geospatial Maritime WG (GMWG)

The role of the GMWG is to develop the specifications, production, and deployment of maritime geospatial information, including Additional Military Layers (AML), The GMWG is supporting NATO Geospatial Policy, including NATO’s concept of the Recognized Environmental Picture (REP). GMWG has a liaison with DGIWG, NATO IGeoWG, GWG, and other organizations. Among recent progress is the endorsement of Bathymetric Attributed Grid (BAG) as the solution for AML Network Model Bathymetry (NMB). The GMWG develops co-production plan in support of NATO and continues population of NATO Geospatial Maritime Catalogues. GMWG products will be provided to the NATO Core GIS.  Portrayal information for the AML and REP are being considered for hosting in the DGIWG Portrayal Registry.

6.8 Geospatial Intelligence Standards Working Group (GWG)

The GWG, chartered under the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Information Technology Standards Committee (ITSC), is an initiative aimed at the coordination of Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT) standards for the U.S National System for Geospatial-Intelligence (NSG). The GWG consists of eight chartered focus groups that address topical issues related to GEOINT standards, including a GEOINT Portrayal Focus Group (PFG).

The DGIWG is an associate member of the GWG.  An effective liaison of DGIWG with GWG is a key target according to the DGIWG Objectives. The Portrayal Focus Group is the principle GWG focus group related to this roadmap activity.

6.9 ICAO - International Civil Aviation Organisation  

The International Civil Aviation Organisation(ICAO), a UN Specialized Agency, is the global forum for civil aviation. ICAO works to achieve its vision of safe, secure and sustainable development of civil aviation through cooperation amongst its member States.

ICAO remains as a liaison member of DGIWG.  This relationship targets the harmonization between civil aeronautical standards and the international military standards and requirements.

ICAO plans to coordinate with DGIWG on requirements for development of a portrayal register for aeronautical data.  The register will contain a harmonized set of aeronautical symbols with rules based on ICAO standards and recommended practices, the Aeronautical Information Exchange Model, and US DOD Digital Flight Information File.  This will lead to a new work item proposal and future project team call for resources.  The US has volunteered to lead the project.  This will be separate from the Aeronautical Information harmonization Working Group (AIHWG) work previously completed.

7 Future State

7.1 The Future of Geospatial Portrayal in DGIWG

Geospatial awareness is one aspect of understanding the operational environment.  Geospatial information will be available from a wide range of sources, including web-based data portals.  Portrayal of geospatial information will also be available in a web-based service.  The combination of net-available geospatial information, the rules that associate this information with graphic symbols, and a service that renders the final map image that the human sees will all be necessary components of a web-based geospatial portrayal architecture.  This information will also be necessary for geographic information systems (GIS) and map production systems that produce traditional softcopy and hardcopy map products. 

In the future, geospatial portrayal will be enabled by the DGIWG Portrayal Registry. The objective of the Portrayal Registry is to provide portrayal information to the user in member nations and organisations. The DGIWG Portrayal Registry will provide symbolsand feature-to-symbol mapping rules to portray geospatial information.  It will be populated with a comprehensive, harmonized cross domain set of symbols and portrayal rules. Agreements between DGIWG and authoritative symbol development organisations ensure that all relevant symbol sets are available through the DGIWG Portrayal Registry.

The DGIWG portrayal registry makes the process of developing, maintaining, and promulgating standards for geospatial symbology easier and more responsive to customer needs. Web-enabling the registrymakes it easy for customers to find and use portrayal information, by means of standards-based commercial applications. A register in the registry is updated easily, ensuring that the latest portrayal information is always available. Retired and superseded symbols are still available for those customers who need them. The portrayal registry also runs in a non-networked capability for users who may not have continuous web access.  This enables organisations to have an offline mirror image of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry.  Organisations can also use their own schema and create an offline registry which holds a copy of the symbology in the DGIWG registry.

The DGIWG Portrayal Registry contains a number of different types of registers, including registers of portrayal functions, which are sets of rules associating instances of geospatial information to specific symbols, and registers of symbols, which are the graphic definitions of the symbols in a standard format or multiple formats, such as Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG),  There are also special purpose registers for colours and type fonts, and a principal register to keep track of all of these other portrayal registers. The output of the registry will be standards-based symbology encoding, which can be used directly by rendering software to render map images.

The content of DGIWG portrayal registers is managed according to a process that is based upon ISO 19135, Geographic information, Procedures for item registration. This DGIWG Portrayal Register Governance Process is carried out by the “control body”, or group of subject matter experts to control the overall content of the DGIWG Portrayal Registers. “Owners” of authoritative symbol sets can maintain their own symbol sets in the DGIWG Portrayal Registry using a web-based portrayal register management service. Alternatively symbol development organisations may have their own portrayal registry and the DGIWG Portrayal Registry just links to this other registry. Other portrayal registries share the same information model and interface standards used by the DGIWG Portrayal Registry.

To benefit from a geospatial portrayal registry in a service-oriented architecture, customers use a web-based portrayal registry service to discover and retrieve (for subsequent rendering) symbols and portrayal rules held in the portrayal registry.  When a user needs to symbolize a geospatial dataset, they will query the DGIWG Portrayal Registry to determine if symbols and portrayal rules for the information to be portrayed are available. Queries can be organized in many different ways. Some users may wish to use a complete symbol library for a specified dataset or data product (such as all the symbols required to portray a VMAP 1 or DNC dataset). Others may wish to request symbols for specific features (such as roads or buildings), or even specific delineations of those features (such as area buildings). A portrayal registry service will return the requested symbols to the end-user, where his/her application can render the symbols on a display screen, or output a map to a printer. Alternatively, the DGIWG Portrayal Registry may be a symbol and style provider chained with a feature portrayal service that returns a map image to the end-user client.  It is also possible to store symbol libraries locally if the application is working in a non-networked environment. The registry service and portrayal service may in fact reside on the local system.  A local registry service may be used to access information in the portrayal registry to make a copy of the register content for a non-networked system.

The DGIWG portrayal service relies on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) to define standard interfaces, methods of communications and an abstract specification to enable OGC compliant services to make use of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry as a source for symbols for geographic portrayal. OGC services that will be available for use include Feature Portrayal Service (FPS), Web Feature Service (WFS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), Catalogue Service for Web (CS-W), and Web Map Service (WMS).  The OGC Symbology Encoding Implementation Specification defines a standardized structure for portrayal rules and symbols. The services that are actually used will be dependent on the GIS capabilities resident on the user’s client, and the intended use of the display.

Figure 2 – Portrayal System Components

DGIWG908Figure 2 – Portrayal System Components.png

The geospatial information system (GIS) industry is evolving to provide great flexibility for geospatial end-users in designing their rendering of geospatial information. It is becoming increasingly important to have guidance and rules to produce an understandable and coherent display of geospatial information when end-users can mix symbols from these different communities of interest in a single display.  Having “proven” effective symbols and rules in a symbol set available for use in a web environment will enable effective visualization of geospatial information and the common operational picture.

The establishment of a DGIWG Portrayal Registry will begin the process of creating a harmonized, integrated portrayal environment for the common operational picture, but initially each of the symbol sets in the registry will still be a stand-alone symbol set.  It will only “harmonize” symbol sets from an information technology perspective, by placing them in a common standard-based dissemination architecture. To take portrayal harmonization to the next level, DGIWG must work with “symbol development organisations” to negotiate changes to existing symbol sets that may be necessary to create a cross-domain, cross-community coherent common operational picture. This may require redesign of symbols already in use. There are several levels of harmonization that DGIWG will strive to achieve.

  • Level 1 harmonization – defining common information technology architecture – provided by DGIWG Portrayal Registry populated with stand-alone symbol sets.
  • Level 2 harmonization – within-domain standardization of symbols – for example, a standard set of topographic symbols.  Some work has already been accomplished, for example, standardization of hydrographic charting symbols worldwide by the International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO), but no comparable standard exists for topographic symbols.  Since stakeholders within a common domain will share common interests, perspectives and requirements, this level of harmonization is achievable, but will take work.
  • Level 3 harmonization – cross-domain standardization of symbols – for example, ensuring that symbols used for portrayal of hydrographic charting do not conflict with symbols for topographic mapping, or symbols for geospatial information do not conflict with symbols for military operations. Very little standardization has been done across symbology domains.  Cooperation will be required between symbol development organisations to make this happen, but may be more difficult, because different communities perhaps have their own views of the world, and may not have a vested interest in changing their symbols.

The following figure illustrates the organisation of portrayal registers that could be maintained in the DGIWG Portrayal.  As increased levels of harmonization are achieved the number of diverse symbol registers will be reduced.

Figure 3 - DGIWG Portrayal Register Organisation

DGIWG908Figure 3 - DGIWG Portrayal Register Organisation.png      

8 Activity Plan

The above described future state will be accomplished through the current and future DGIWG projects and activities. This chapter describes current project and future work that will need to be accomplished to achieve the DGIWG future state.  Items shown in are future activities, which do not have DGIWG projects.

8.1 Current Projects

DGIWG Project D06 - Information Model for Portrayal of Geospatial Information and Schema for DGIWG Portrayal Registry

The first stage in the development of a DGIWG Portrayal Registry is the development of an application schema for a portrayal registry and registers based on the standards ISO 19135 - Geographic information – Procedures for item registration, and ISO 19117 – Geographic information portrayal. A by-product of this work is a revision of ISO 19117; this work is proceeding within the framework of ISO TC/211. DGIWG will proceed with development of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry schema based on the ISO 19117 Committee Draft (December 2009).

The DGIWG Portrayal Registry will be made accessible for preview and download on the DGIWG web-site and as a resource available for use by a feature portrayal service. Initially the content of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry will contain Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display (GeoSym) symbols and portrayal rules, and the symbols and rules developed in Project D28 for the Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP). The maintenance of these portrayal registers, and portrayal registers to be added in the future will be maintained by the symbol or portrayal rule set owners.

DGIWG Project D22 - Implementation of a Prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry

The application schema being developed in project D06 is being tested and verified in a prototype implementation of a portrayal registry in this project. This prototype implementation is attempting to integrate existing portrayal standards in a common portrayal registry structure.

The symbology standards that will be included in the prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry include GeoSym – both editions 1 and 2, and Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP) Symbology.  Additional portrayal standards such as MIL-STD-2525C, Common Warfighting Symbology, International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO) S-52, and International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) symbology may be included as follow-on activities as DGIWG community requirements for geospatial information portrayal are refined and agreements with symbol development organisations external to the DGIWG are made. The DGIWG Portrayal Registry is intended to go beyond being merely a prototype and develop into a fully deployed system, and made available to the DGIWG community and beyond. The registry, with mapping rule sets and symbol libraries, will be made available through service interfaces.

The transition of the prototype version of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry to an operational registry will first require development of a DGIWG Profile of ISO 19117 and ISO 19135 (D06 deliverable) . In the meantime, a prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry based on a pre-ISO 19117 data model but having a standardized “look and feel” of other DGIWG registries will be added to the DGIWG web site.  Finally, the registry database structure will be updated to conform to the December 2009 CD of ISO 19117, and OGC Symbology Encoding (SE) output capability will be added.

Another aspect of the prototype DGIWG Portrayal Registry is to develop a governance process for management of the content of the portrayal registers.  This governance process will include management of the principal portrayal register, which identifies the symbol sets and portrayal rule sets that are held in the DGIWG Portrayal Registry, and also manage the individual portrayal rules and symbols registers.  Symbol and portrayal rules registers may be owned by DGIWG, but may also be owned by symbol development organisations external to the DGIWG. 

Implementation of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry registration capability will use the Register Manager (RegMan) Tool that was developed in DGIWG Project D26.  At this time, the RegMan Tool only supports the maintenance of Feature and Attribute Data (FAD).  In the future, it will be enhanced to provide the capability to maintain portrayal registers as well.

DGIWG Project S01 - Portrayal Service

This project is developing DGIWG specifications for portrayal services. The specifications will define the requirements and service interfaces for interacting with the DGIWG Portrayal Registry. This project is not only specifying service interfaces to access the portrayal registers but also service interfaces for the management of the registers in the registry as well as a DGIWG equivalence to the OGC Feature Portrayal Service. The S01 project will not deliver any service implementation, only service interface specifications

The S01 project has three specifications as project deliverables and the project team is currently working on all three of them. One of the specifications is a general register implementation while the other two specifications are portrayal specific. The three specifications are denoted as S01 Part 1, S01 Part 2 and S01 Part 3 respectively:

  • S01 Part 1: a DGIWG General Registry Service Interface Implementation Specification. The service will allow to access and manage DGIWG Registrycontent
  • S01 Part 2: a DGIWG Portrayal Registry Service Interface Implementation Specification. The service will allow to access and manage DGIWG Portrayal Registrycontent
  • S01 Part 3: a DGIWG Feature Portrayal Service Interface Specification. The service will allow the visualization of features from a feature database using rules and symbols from the DGIWG Portrayal Registry

Development of portrayal service specifications face substantial dependencies on other DGIWG projects and work by non-DGIWG standards development organisations.  S01 Part 1 will be based on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) ebXML RegRep;  S01 Part 2 faces substantial dependencies on the completion of D06 DGIWG Profile of 19117 and 19135. D06 in turn can not be completed until the revision of ISO 19117 has stabilized. S01 Part 3 also faces substantial dependencies, both on the outcome of D06 and the S01 Part 2 DGIWG Portrayal Registry Service Interface Implementation Specification.

The following chart illustrates the various portrayal activities of DGIWG and other standards development bodies.  The gray arrows indicate dependencies on the work of other groups.

Figure 4 – DGIWG Projects and Dependencies

DGIWG908Figure 4 – DGIWG Projects and Dependencies.png

While projects D06, D22, and S01 are primarily focused on developing the technical implementation of a DGIWG portrayal registry and portrayal services, other DGIWG projects, including D14, D15, and D28 are developing content for the DGIWG portrayal registers.

DGIWG Project D14 - Symbols for Mission Specific Data

This project was intended to develop symbology to portray U.S. Mission Specific Data.  The project is being cancelled and will be replaced by a new project “Symbols for digital representation of topographic information”, to develop symbology rules for digital display of topographic information.  The encoding of these rules will be based on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Symbology Encoding (SE) Implementation Specification, and hosted in the DGIWG Portrayal Registry.

The U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency is developing a National System for Geospatial Intelligence (NSG) Portrayal Standard for Topographic Data Store (TDS) Data.  TDS will be a significant portion of what NGA had considered “Mission Specific Data” in the past. TDS has multiple density levels, including Local Topographic Data Store (LTDS) at 1:50,000 data density, Regional Topographic Data Store (RTDS) at 1:250,000 data density, Global Topographic Data Store (GTDS) at 1:1,000,000 data density, and Urban/Special Topographic Data Store (UTDS).  NGA has a requirement for hardcopy map and digital display of TDS data.  Whether this project remains a U.S. national project or can become a DGIWG project will depend on whether the TDS data content specifications are adopted by other DGIWG member nations.

DGIWG Project D15 - Symbols for Hardcopy Output of Mission Specific Data

This project was intended to develop symbols and portrayal rules to portray a standard 1:50,000 topographic map generated from U.S. Mission Specific Data.  In concept it was similar to the DGIWG Portrayal Standard for Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP) Data.  This project will be based on the MGCP symbology, but expanded to include the content of a standard topographic map, and the symbols will be redesigned to reduce the amount of textual information shown on symbols. 

The project is being retitled Symbols for hardcopy representation of topographic information and restructured to develop only the standardized symbols (not the portrayal rules) for portrayal of a topographic map. Since MSD was a US-centric data source, the portrayal rules that associate symbols with MSD features would not be relevant to other DGIWG members, and are being removed from the scope of this project.  Instead, the “intended meaning” of symbols will be identified in symbol metadata. DGIWG member nations can then develop portrayal rule sets as national projects that map their own feature catalogues to these standardized topographic symbols.

NATO and some DGIWG Nations (e.g. Germany) have the same need for new products based on the recently developed national and international data models and specifications. There is a requirement in NATO for level 0 to 5 topographic products and DGIWG member nations may also have data models in the scale range of 1:25,000 to 1:5,000,000. These models may or may not be equal to the US TDSs.  DGIWG should support the development of new “digital based” products to expand and/or replace old specifications (e.g. TLM50). These new specifications should be independent from the underlying model as much as possible but should be a product specification with as much detail as necessary for standardized production of topographic maps. These new product specifications are fundamental and should be transformed in a STANAG by NATO IGEOWG as soon as possible.

Development of standard topographic product specifications for DGIWG and NATO are outside the scope of D15.

8.2 Future Projects & Activities

DGIWG has identified several areas where additional work is needed. The T03 Project team will formulate DGWIG new work item proposals for the following activities and submit them according to DGIWG procedures. These include:

Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Registry

DGIWG already has a prototype portrayal registry under development under Project D22. To transition this prototype to an operational registry will require further development to restructure the registry in accordance with a new data model based on ISO 19135 and ISO 19117, revised version.  This work is included within the scope of Project D22. 

Once the Portrayal Registry has been implemented within the scope of Project D22, additional actions are required for an operational DGIWG Portrayal Registry:

  • Establishment of a maintenance team and process.   DGIWG will need to implement and resource a process to control the content of the DGIWG Portrayal Registry. The DGIWG project MT-05 has been assigned, but not yet resourced. This process must include collaboration with symbol development organisations who own symbol sets contained in the DGIWG Portrayal Registry. DGIWG will also need to establish control bodies for any DGIWG-owned symbol sets that may be created in the future, and the control body for the Principal Portrayal Register. The MT05 Project will be responsible for implementing the maintenance process.
  • The Register Management Tool (RegMan) developed for the Feature and Attribute Data (FAD) Maintenance Team in Project D26 will need to be extended to accommodate portrayal-unique requirements.
Implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Service

The implementation of a DGIWG Portrayal Service is not seen as a DGIWG responsibility, but rather a national responsibility, using the portrayal service specifications developed by the S01 project, and working with vendors to implement them.

International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO)

ICAO and NGA will coordinate with DGIWG to draft requirements for a portrayal register based on the ICAO standards and the AIXM exchange model, and a portrayal register based on US DOD Digital Flight Information File model.  This may lead to a new work proposal and a future project team may be called to be resourced, US has volunteered to lead.

New symbology requirements

Emerging requirements for portrayal of geospatial data may require establishment of DGIWG projects for the development of symbols and portrayal rules that will populate a register in the DGIWG Portrayal Registry.  No formal requirements have been validated yet, but potential new symbol/rule sets might include Additional Military Layers (AML), Military Geographic Information Documentation (MGID), and NATO APP-6C, Joint Symbology.

Harmonization Projects

Plans for a DGIWG Portrayal Registry include holding existing symbol sets in a common IT infrastructure.  These symbol sets were developed independently, and serve different communities of interest.  In order to establish joint symbology for portrayal of a common operational picture across different user domains and communities, DGIWG will work with symbol development organisations to negotiate changes to existing symbol sets that may be necessary to create a cross-domain, cross-community portrayal. This may require redesign of symbols already in use. This will be addressed in a number of projects.

Annex A– OGC Specifications

A.1   Symbology Encoding

Symbology Encoding Implementation Specification (document n°05-077) specifies an XML encoding that can be used for styling feature and coverage data.  This specification results from the breakdown of the previous Styled Layer Descriptor Implementation Specification.  Enhancements include the ability to support coverage data, not addressed in SLD 1.1. It is independent of any service interface specification. It can be used flexibly by a number of services that style georeferenced information or store styling information for use by other services.  It is currently used in the Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the WMS specification and was adopted as official Implementation Specification by OGC in Fall 2006.

A.2   Web Feature Service

Web Feature Service Implementation Specification (document n°04-094) is a broadly adopted and implemented service interface specification.  It defines a standard interface for accessing, retrieving and optionally updating geographic features on a network.  The data is provided to the client as GML (latest version 3.1).  WFS does not include a portrayal mechanism.  Only service chaining with portrayal services such as WMS or the SLD Profile of WMS (see below) can offer the client portrayal capabilities.  Revision of the current version 1.1 is progressing as a joint OGC/ ISO project.

A.3   Web Map Service

Web Map Service 1.3.0 Implementation Specification (document n°06-042) is broadly adopted and implemented.  It defines a standard interface for obtaining basic map images for feature portrayal. User-defined portrayal capabilities are not supported.  The OGC document has been adopted as ISO 19128 by ISO/TC 211.

A.4   Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the Web Map Service

Styled Layer Descriptor Profile of the Web Map Service Draft Implementation Specification (document n°05-078) results from the breakdown of the previous SLD specification.  It is not in itself a profile but specifies extensions to the Web Map Service specification which allows for a more elaborate feature portrayal by means of a new parameter that can reference a Symbology Encoding document.

Annex B– StandardSymbol Sets

NATO Standardization Agreement (STANAG) 3675, Symbols for Land Maps, Aeronautical Charts, and Special Naval Charts for Joint Operations at Scale 1:250,000

Owner: NATO Inter-Service Geographic Working Party (IGEOWP)

Content:  Topographic and aeronautical symbols.

Related standards: Symbols for special naval charts reference IHO INT 1 (see below).

MIL-STD-2402, Mapping, Charting, and Geodesy Symbols for Graphic Products

Owner: US National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)

Content:  Map/chart symbols for NGA hardcopy products. 

Related standards: Hydrographic symbols are based on IHO INT 1 (see below).

DGIWG Portrayal Standard for Multinational Geospatial Co-Production Program (MGCP) Data

Owner: DGIWG

Content: Symbols for portrayal of MGCP data.

Related standards: MIL-STD-2402

MIL-DTL-89045A, Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display (GeoSym) ®

Owner: US National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)

Content:  Map symbols to portray feature/attribute data contained in NGA standard Vector Product Format (VPF) products.  GeoSym v1.0 can be seen as both a register of portrayal catalogues (set or portrayal rules) and a register of symbols involved in those portrayal catalogues.  It is sectioned to be dependent on product specifications.  The portrayal rules are linked to the data through their feature catalogues, even if this relationship is ensured through FACC codes.     GeoSym shares this principle with the ISO 19117 and IHO S-52 standards.  GeoSym has dependencies on VPF (contains components to support GeoSym) which may not be relevant or present in future standards like GML.

Related standards:  Hydrographic symbols are based on IHO S-52 (see below).

MIL-STD-2525C, Common Warfighting Symbology

Owner:  US Department of Defense, Symbology Standards Management Committee (SSMC)

Content: Military units, equipment, facilities, battlefield tactical graphics, METOC, Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) symbols, and symbols for Military Operations Other Than War (MOOTW).

Related standards: METOC symbols are derived from World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) symbols.

NATO Allied Publication APP-6A, Military Symbols for Land Systems

Owner:  NATO Joint Symbology Panel

Content: Generally derived from MIL-STD-2552B (see above).  For command & control systems, APP 6A is a standard which applies to C2 users.  There is rationalisation activity under way in UK.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI-INCITS 415-2006) American National Standard for Information Technology - Homeland Security Mapping Standard – Point Symbology for Emergency Management

Owner:  US Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)

Content: Symbols for incidents, natural events, operations, and infrastructure for emergency response. 

Related standards: Meteorological natural events symbols are derived from World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) symbols.

World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Weather Symbols

Owner: World Meteorological Organisation (WMO)

Content: Symbols for weather phenomena.

INT-1, Symbols, Abbreviations, and Terms Used on Charts

Owner: International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)

Content: Internationally standardized symbols for hardcopy hydrographic navigation charts.  IHO member nations’ “Chart 1” are based on this standard.

Special Publication S-52, Colour and Symbol Specification for ECDIS

Owner: International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)

Content: Internationally standardized symbols for Electronic Navigation Charts (ENC) used in Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS).

Special Publication S-100, Geospatial Standard for Hydrographic Data

Owner: International Hydrographic Organisation (IHO)

Content: Internationally standardized symbols for Electronic Navigation Charts (ENC) used in Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS), Replacement for S-52.

Air Standards Coordinating Committee (ASCC) Advisory Publication 90/03, Flight Information Publications (FLIP) Navigation Displays – Symbology

Owner: Air Standards Coordinating Committee (ASCC)

Content: Symbols for information shown on FLIPS, primarily airfield information and lighting, aids to navigation, airspace control areas and boundaries, vertical obstructions, and terminal procedures.

Annex C– Terms, definitions and abbreviations

DFDD   DGWIG Feature Data Dictionary

DIGEST Digital Geospatial Information Exchange Standard

FACC   Feature and Attribute Coding Catalogue

FPS      Feature Portrayal Service

GeoSym®  Geospatial Symbols for Digital Display

                ® Registered trademark of National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

GSIP    Geospatial Structure Implementation Profile

ISO       International Organisation for Standardization

NAS     National System for Geospatial Intelligence Application Schema

OGC     Open Geospatial Consortium

SE        Symbology Encoding

SLD      Styled Layer Descriptor

WCS     Web Coverage Service

WFS     Web Feature Service

WMS    Web Map Service

NEXT

Page statistics
3846 view(s) and 28 edit(s)
Social share
Share this page?

Tags

This page has no custom tags.
This page has no classifications.

Comments

You must to post a comment.

Attachments